AP Lit 19th Century Lit Paper - Espinoza 1 Adi Espinoza Mrs.Mortell AP Lit Period 6 2 March 2017 The Struggle for Eyre Many times throughout literature

AP Lit 19th Century Lit Paper - Espinoza 1 Adi Espinoza...

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Espinoza 1 Adi Espinoza Mrs.Mortell AP Lit Period 6 2 March 2017 The Struggle for Eyre Many times throughout literature the main character can go through a struggle to find out who they really are. It can from a classic story like Romeo and Juliet where the two struggle to find themselves while family values hold them back, or modern works like Oryx and Crake where the main character finds himself by facing his past. In the classic Victorian novel Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte, the main character , Jane Eyre, takes the reader throughout her life journey and the struggles she had as a woman who does not fit the typical Victorian Age female image. In this groundbreaking novel Jane begins as the meek sheep and then evolves into the strong Lioness, she is the heroine that will gain understanding and awareness throughout her story through her own personal voice and experiences; as well as showing Jane’s story, Bronte also uses the narration of the book to show how Jane achieves this evolution. As Jane’s story begins she is telling the reader how she was a submissive young girl with moments of true voice (that will soon be revealed as Jane grows older), but her time with the Reeds at Gateshead is crucial to her understanding of the world around her. In the cliche “Cinderella” way, Jane was brought in by a secondary family that did not want her but used her more as a servant, and treated her worse than any servant. As Jane gets a small escape from the Reeds, she goes to a window and reads (which is rare for a young Victorian age girl), but then she is caught by the son, John Reed, where she abused. John says to her, You have no business to take our books; you are dependent, mama says;
Espinoza 2 you have no money; your father left you none; you ought to beg, and not to live here with gentlemen's children like us… ( Bronte 12) . Here, John Reed degrades Jane as a person, he is saying that Jane is worthless in their family and does not deserve to share such luxuries like the Reed do. For any young girl this could have broken her sense of self worth, but Jane had always had a strong sense of who she was. This intelligence came from the books Jane had read, where she was able to form her own ideals and

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