27Aug08 - 10 Polysaccharides (Brock, Fig. 3.6) Different...

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1 Microbes Microbes either prokaryotic (lack a true nucleus) or eukaryotic (have a true nucleus) Some free-living, some not Most are single-celled, but some may come together at different times of the life cycle Vary in size ( E. coli is 1x2 μ m), but most are small (need a microscope to see) Very old life forms
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2 Evolution of life
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3 Microbes are everywhere
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5 Prokaryotic and eukaryotic microbes
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6 You need to know Basic biochemical structure of important classes of molecules and functional groups Basic structure of macromolecules and types of intermolecular bonds Redox reactions
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9 Carbohydrates (Brock Fig. 3.4) organic compounds containing C, H, O in 1:2:1 ratio • C 5 sugars important in NA (nucleic acid) • C 6 important for structure (cell wall) and in energy interconversions
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Unformatted text preview: 10 Polysaccharides (Brock, Fig. 3.6) Different linkages between sugars lead to different structures Bacterial cell walls contain special glc (glucose) derivatives that contain N-acetyl groups 11 12 13 14 Nucleotides (Brock, Fig. 3.8) 15 Structure of bases in nucleic acid (NA) Brock, Fig. 3-9) 16 DNA and RNA Know bp rules and differences between AT and GC pairs 17 18 19 20 Protein 2 and 3 0 structure 21 Immunoglobulin (antibody) basics (Bauman Fig. 16.5) An antigen is a molecular 3-D structure recognized by an antibody (is therefore foreign to some organism) Antibodies are mass-produced and form the basis of many diagnostics Antibodies are able to distinguish between single AA or carbohydrate changes...
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This note was uploaded on 09/16/2008 for the course MCB 3020 taught by Professor Ogden during the Fall '08 term at University of Florida.

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27Aug08 - 10 Polysaccharides (Brock, Fig. 3.6) Different...

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