Stage+2+Physics+Unit+2 - 1 Stage II Physics Electricity and...

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1 Stage II Physics Electricity and Magnetism
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2 Section 2: Electricity and Magnetism Topic 1: Electric Fields The two fundamental postulates of electrostatics are introduced: Coulomb’s law, and the principle of superposition. Several important electric field distributions are discussed. The electric field at a point in space is defined and used, with Coulomb’s law, to derive an expression for the electric field at a distance from a point charge. In this topic the charges are assumed to be in a vacuum (or, for practical purposes, air). The principle of superposition is used to explain the fact that a near-uniform electric field can be produced by two charged parallel conducting plates. The absence of an electric field in hollow conductors is discussed. The presence of strong electric fields in the vicinity of sharp points on charged conductors is identified and applied to corona discharges in relation to photocopiers and laser printers. Key Ideas Students should know and understand the following: Intended Student Learning Students should be able to do the following: Coulomb’s Law Any two stationary point charges experience mutual forces along the line joining them. These forces are attractive if the charges are unlike and repulsive if they are alike. The magnitude of these forces is directly proportional to the product of the two charges and inversely proportional to the square of the distance between them. Solve problems involving the use of 1 2 2 0 1 4 q q F r  where F is the magnitude of the electric forces, 1 q and 2 q are the charges, r is the distance between them, and 0 1 4  is the proportionality constant. Using proportionality, discuss changes in the magnitude of the force on each of the charges as a result of a change in one or both of the charges and/or a change in the distance between them. Explain that the electric forces are consistent with Newton’s third law. Principle of Superposition When more than two point charges are present, the force on any one of them is equal to the vector sum of the forces due to each of the other point charges. Using vector addition, calculate the magnitude and direction of the force on a point charge due to two other point charges. Electric Field
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3 Key Ideas Students should know and understand the following: Intended Student Learning Students should be able to do the following: Electric charges establish an electric field E r in the surrounding space. The electric field at any point produces a force on an electric charge placed at that point. The electric field at a point is defined as the electric force F r per unit charge on a small positive test charge q placed at that point, provided that all charges remain undisturbed: E F q r r .
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