Stage 2 Physics Unit 1 - 1 Stage II Physics MoTon in ±wo...

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1 Stage II Physics Motion in Two Dimensions
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2 Section 1: Motion in Two Dimensions 1: Projectile Motion In the absence of air resistance, and moving under the action of a constant gravitational force, a projectile has a constant acceleration in the direction of the force. The horizontal component of velocity of such a projectile is constant, and the vertical component changes at a constant rate. The time of flight and the range of the projectile are calculated, and the effect of air resistance on the motion is treated qualitatively. These key ideas are applied to projectiles in sport (e.g. a shot put). Key Ideas Students should know and understand the following: Intended Student Learning Students should be able to do the following: Vertical and Horizontal Components of Velocity For a projectile, in the absence of air resistance, the: horizontal component of velocity is constant acceleration is in the vertical direction and is the same as that of a vertically free-falling object. Given a multi-image photograph of a projectile, demonstrate that the: horizontal component of velocity is constant acceleration is in the vertical direction and is the same as that of a vertically free-falling object. The horizontal motion and the vertical motion are independent of each other: the constant vertical acceleration is independent of the horizontal speed. Draw a vector diagram in which the horizontal and vertical components of velocity are added, giving the resultant velocity vector at any instant. The acceleration of a projectile, in the absence of air resistance, is in the direction of the gravitational force. Using trigonometric calculations or a scale diagram, calculate, from its horizontal and vertical components, the magnitude and direction of a velocity vector at any instant. On a diagram showing the path of a projectile, draw vectors to represent the velocity and acceleration of the projectile at any instant. Determination of the Vertical Component of Velocity The equations for constant acceleration in one dimension can be used to calculate the vertical component of velocity of a projectile at any instant. Given the initial velocity of a projectile, calculate the vertical component of velocity at any instant. Resolution of Velocity into Components Velocity can be resolved into its horizontal and vertical components at any instant. Using trigonometric calculations or a scale diagram, resolve a velocity vector into its horizontal and vertical components. Time of Flight The time of flight of a projectile is determined by the change in vertical component of velocity and the acceleration. Calculate the time of flight of a projectile in cases where the final height is the same as the initial height.
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