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3 handout - Proteins and Enzymes Plastic beads coated with...

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Proteins and Enzymes Book: Life (8 th ed., Sadava et al.) Reading: Ch. 3 pp. 38-48 Ch. 6 pp. 125-135 Lisa Cameron, Julie Theriot lab Plastic beads coated with the ActA protein. Polymerization of ActA acts like a motor on the surface of disease- causing bacteria to propel them from one host cell to the next QuickTime ° and a Cinepak decompressor are needed to see this picture.
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Learning Objectives After this lecture, you should be able to: Explain the various roles proteins play in cells and be able to provide many examples. Describe and draw the generic structure of an amino acid and a peptide bond. Describe and illustrate the levels of protein structure Describe the various chemical properties that the amino acids can have (positively charged, non-polar, etc). Explain the importance of the ‘R’ groups in determining protein structure/function. Explain the significance of the order of amino acids within a protein (e.g. Is a stretch of hydrophobic amino acids more likely to be positioned in the interior or exterior of a mature, folded protein? What effect might a substitution of a particular amino acid have on the function of a protein?). Explain the parameters affecting the kinetics of a chemical reaction Explain the effects enzymes have on a biological reaction. Explain the mechanisms by which enzymes catalyze reactions. Describe any of a multitude of ways in which enzymes can be regulated.
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Cross section of muscle fiber with tendons Proteins can play many roles in the cell Example: Many of the proteins that make up muscles are structural in nature Many proteins are structural in nature
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Example: Mitotic spindle is composed primarily of a of a structural protein called tubulin (green). The chromosomes are blue.
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