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Sodium Benzoate - Sodium Borohydride Reduction The...

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Sodium Borohydride Reduction: The Conversion of Benzophenone to Diphenylmethanol Tuesday 6-10 pm November 13, 2007
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Introduction Benzophenone was converted to diphenylmethanol using sodium borohydride as the reducing agent. Recrystallization was performed to purity the product and a percent yield, melting point and IR were obtained. Theory, Reactions, and Mechanisms Like oxidation reactions, reduction reactions are one of the major classes of reactions in organic chemistry. A reduction reaction can be categorized by a gain of electrons from the loss of oxygen from a bond, the addition of hydrogen to a bond, or the replacement of a more electronegative atom with carbon or hydrogen. The addition of hydrogen across the bond is called catalytic hydrogenation. This method of reduction reduces most types of multiple bonds. A common catalyst involved in catalytic hydrogenation is platinum (see figure 1). Other catalysts, such as palladium and pyridine, are also used. Figure 1. Catalytic Hydrogenation with Platinum.
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A more specific reduction involves hydride transfer reagents. These hydride transfer reagents act as hydride ion donors. A hydride is a hydrogen atom with a negative charge: H -1 . They contain at least one hydrogen atom that is bonded to another atom which is less electronegative then hydrogen. With a greater difference in electronegativity comes a more reactive reagent as a hydride donor. In order for these reactions to work, high temperature and pressure are needed. Two important reagents are sodium borohydride, NaBH 4
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