Specific Heat - Specific Heat Abstract: The goal of this...

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Specific Heat Abstract: The goal of this experiment is to calculate specific heat, the amount of calories required to raise one gram of a substance by one degree Kelvin, by putting the hot, unknown metal into cool water in an isolated system (two Styrofoam cups). We calculated the specific heat of the unknown metal to be 221.6 j/(gK). The unknown metal was actually Tin, so it is only a 2% error from the accepted value of 216.8 j/(gK)
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Introduction and Theory: Specific heat is the amount of heat required to raise the temperature of a unit of mass by one degree. This lab was designed knowing, E th = mC( T), where E th is the change in thermal energy C is the specific heat of the object, m is the mass and T is the change in temperature. Knowing that equations allows us to calculate the specific heat of an unknown metal, by adding the E th(water) to E th(metal) . Adding the equations together give us the equation m water C water (T f – T i(water) ) + m metal C metal
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This note was uploaded on 09/17/2008 for the course PHYS 408 taught by Professor Beane during the Spring '08 term at New Hampshire.

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Specific Heat - Specific Heat Abstract: The goal of this...

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