2nd Essay

2nd Essay - 1 L&S 20A Jabberwocky Making Sense of...

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November 13, 2007 Jabberwocky: Making Sense of Nonsense “Jabberwocky,” written by Lewis Carrol, is an interesting poem, because it tells a story using made up words. Despite the use of nonsense, readers can still understand the general story of the poem. It holds a similar aura of a Dr. Seuss book, because it contains words made up by combining other words, made up animals, and words representing different kinds of onomatopoeias. This poem fills its audience with all sorts of ideas that the audience doesn’t understand. The filling of ideas gives the readers the pleasure of understanding what they shouldn’t really be able to understand. Right at the first stanza, the poem is incomprehensible. It is apparent that the first stanza serves to be an introduction or a setting marker of the story. “’Twas” automatically states that a certain time is going to be mentioned. After that, the stanza is filled with made up words. However, even though the words are nonsense, the functions of the words are still apparent. They are visible because of the words’ positions in the sentences. “Brillig” in the first line is a certain time, because it follows the word “’Twas.” “Slithy” is an adjective that describes “toves.” Both “gyre” and “gimble” in line 2 are actions that were taken place in the “wabe,” which is a place. The “borogoves” in line 3 are “mimsy,” and the “mome raths” are doing an action, “outgrabe,” which is a verb.
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2nd Essay - 1 L&S 20A Jabberwocky Making Sense of...

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