U.S. Government - Ciglar 1.1, 1.2, 1.3 Summary

U.S. Government - Ciglar 1.1, 1.2, 1.3 Summary - Ciglar 1.1...

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Ciglar 1.1 – A Tradition Born of Strife by Jack N. Rakove, p. 3-8. In writing a new constitution the Framers concluded that the Union needed to be completely reconstituted and that the states individual constitution-building experiences provided a series of practical lessons to draw on. These state experiences taught the Framers to think of a constitution as specifying the broad nature and powers of the government , an integral part in making it the supreme law of the land Basically their prior state experiences gave the Framers a based of understanding for their more difficult task England had no constitution 11 of 13 colonies wrote constitutions – take citizens out of the “state of nature” and to be governed by consent o This was revolutionary because it was breaking the constitutional tradition inherited from England Constitution was also revolutionary because it was adopted under conditions that it was the supreme and fundamental law of the land. Limiting government.
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This note was uploaded on 09/10/2008 for the course POL 110 taught by Professor Sampson during the Spring '08 term at Gustavus.

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U.S. Government - Ciglar 1.1, 1.2, 1.3 Summary - Ciglar 1.1...

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