U.S. Government - Final Exam Study Guide

U.S. Government - Final Exam Study Guide - O'CONNOR CH. 13,...

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O'CONNOR CH. 13, PUBLIC POLICY Definition of public policy An intentional course of action followed by government in dealing with some matter of concern Two fundamental questions: 1. How should we be governed? (Who holds the power and who makes policy?) 1. What should government do? (What is the scope and purpose of government?) 7 stages of policy-making process (Figure 13.1, p. 391) Systemic agenda versus government agenda Systemic agenda: All public issues that are viewed as requiring governmental attention; a discussion agenda
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Government agenda: The changing list of issues to which government’s believe they should address themselves Implementation techniques – authoritative, incentive, capacity, hortatory Authoritative: For policy implementation rest on the notion that people’s actions must be directed or restrained by government to prevent or eliminate activities or products that are unsafe, unfair, evil, or immoral Example: consumer product safety regulations, radio and TV regulations, Title IX, etc. Incentive: For policy implementation encourage people to act in their own best interest by offering payoffs or financial inducements to get them to comply with public policies Example: tax deductions to encourage charitable giving, drive hybrid cars. Or farm subsidies, etc. Capacity: Provide people with information, education, training, or resources that will enable them to participate in desired activities. The assumption of underlying the provision is that people have the incentive or desire to do what is right but lack the capacity to act accordingly. Example: job training may enable able-bodied people to find work Hortatory: Encourage people to comply with policy by appealing to people’s “better instincts” in an effort to get them to act in desired ways. In this instance, policy implementers assume that people decide how to act according to their personal values and beliefs on matters such as right and wrong, equality, and justice Example: “just say no to drugs” and “only you can prevent forest fires” Social welfare policy, Social Security Act, non-means-based program, means-tested program Social welfare policy: Government programs designed to improve quality of life Origins of Social Welfare Policy: The Great Depression of the 1930s convinced many people around the world that some government participation in economy is required. The Depression revealed that state governments and private charities simply could not provide economic security for the vast majority of the population.
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Many of our social welfare programs generally date from these years and this crisis. FDR’s administration started many programs to help the needy. In 1935 the Social Security Act made the government the major a contributor to income
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This note was uploaded on 09/10/2008 for the course POL 110 taught by Professor Sampson during the Spring '08 term at Gustavus.

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U.S. Government - Final Exam Study Guide - O'CONNOR CH. 13,...

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