Movement

Movement - Topic 11: The Sensory-Motor System 3 GENERAL...

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Unformatted text preview: Topic 11: The Sensory-Motor System 3 GENERAL RULES OF MOTOR CONTROL In order to behave (move, talk, stand or sit, write, read, or play basketball) you need to be able to communicate complex programming to your muscles. THERE ARE 3 GENERAL RULES OF MOTOR CONTROL: 1. Control is hierarchical (Be sure you look carefully at Figure 11.4 ) damage to lower levels (spinal injuries, damage to brain stem nuclei), tends to eliminate movement to specific regions or make movements jerky rather then smooth (cerebellar damage), while damage to telencephalic regions causes problems with programmed complex movements (e.g., talking or writing) or interferes with the ability to start a movement. within the hierarchy, different brain regions serve different functions. Note that different regions of the telencephalon as well as modulating structures such as the cerebellum and basal ganglion all have different functions in the control of movements. 2. Motor output is guided by sensory input (please read carefully P. 329 of your textbook starting at the section on Sensory feedback.. Be sure you know how muscle spindles and Golgi tendon organs work, Figure 11.9 ) feedback from muscles is critical except for ballistic movements. If you cant feel your arm, it is difficult to move it. feedback from muscles is critical except for ballistic movements....
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This note was uploaded on 09/17/2008 for the course PSY 91 taught by Professor Williams during the Spring '08 term at Duke.

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Movement - Topic 11: The Sensory-Motor System 3 GENERAL...

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