Grammar Journal Entries - Brenna Weaver English Grammar Journal Entries Part 1 Sin and Syntax Entry 1 Chapter 3-Verbs This chapter is on verbs as the

Grammar Journal Entries - Brenna Weaver English Grammar...

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Brenna Weaver English Grammar Journal Entries Part 1- Sin and Syntax Entry 1- Chapter 3-Verbs This chapter is on verbs, as the chapter title suggests, and the subcategories of these little gems that complete sentences. The first subdivision is into static and dynamic. Dynamic verbs refer to genuine action, real diamonds. Static verbs are the cubic zirconia of the verb world, they look pretty to laypeople and they have their place, but if you can afford a diamond in the ring, put a diamond in the ring. They show a state of being, or other similar concepts, but they don’t enjoy the spotlight. They send it on to the other parts of the sentence. Perhaps the band has intricate carving or engraving in it, and the guy proposing with it prefers the focus be on that. Static verbs have a job, but dynamic ones are preferred when they can be substituted. Underneath the umbrella of static verbs, there are sensory verbs and existential verbs. Existential verbs are to-be verbs, and sensory verbs describe the senses. Sensing verbs can be dynamic or static. The last class of verbs is below the first two, auxiliary verbs make verb phrases with the main verb, mainly used to conjugate tenses(he had been shopping), show conditional mood, make questions, negatives, and other fun things. Inexperienced writers tend to use static verbs because there’s less commitment. Verbs also have voice. Active voice is when the subject performs the action; passive voice is when the subject receives the action. A lot of verbs got their start as nouns, but some people take it too far and the resulting verbs, frankly, suck. The first sentence of this chapter spoke to me as I sat down to read this chapter. “‘One day the nouns were clustered in the street,’ writes Kenneth Koch in the opening line of his poem ‘Permanently’. ‘The next day a verb drove up and created the sentence.’” The bare minimum for
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sentences are verbs. “Go,” “Sit,” “Shake”, they’re sentences with just verbs. Other parts of speech alone don’t make sentences. They’re nice and all, but they don’t make sentences. Verbs are what makes sentences complete. They’re completely necessary. It’s amazing how the entirety of the concept of grammar, writing, complete sentences, it all hinges on one part of speech. An engagement ring without even a little diamond is a plain band with an empty setting, it’s incomplete, and the girl will see it as broken and maybe say no. I disagree with the statement that the verb “televise” is awkward. Televised sports game, whatever, I don’t find it awkward and clumsy at all . Maybe I’m desensitized to it, like the froufrou marketing techniques discussed in the last presentation, since the television has existed for about sixty years and technology has brought a slew of new words with it(selfie is a noun, screenshot is both a noun and a verb, to name a couple) .
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  • Spring '14
  • AbigailLBowers
  • English, It, verb phrase

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