demo13 - is one single disturbance moving along the medium....

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Demonstration for Class 13 -- Mechanical Waves Mechanical waves are those that require some sort of medium to travel through. Waves, like sound waves, water waves, vibrating strings, etc., are distinguished from electromagnetic waves that can propagate through vacuum. In "transverse waves", the medium moves perpendicular to the motion of the wave. In "longitudinal waves", the medium moves parallel to the motion of the wave. Some waves are both transverse and longitudinal, called "elliptical waves". Water waves are like that. Watch something floating on a pond. When a wave passes, the object doesn't just move up and down, but side to side a bit, too. A wave pulse
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Unformatted text preview: is one single disturbance moving along the medium. A wave train is a succession of pulses. Using a thick rope, we can easily see one single wave pulse moving down the rope. The rope works well to show a pulse because the pulse moves slowly enough to be observed. The reason is that wave speed is proportional to tension in the rope and inversely proportional to density. v = = = density linear tension wavespeed If you have a stretched rubber hose, the tension is high, so the speed is large. In a loose rope, the tension is very low, so the wave speed is small. It also helps that the density of the rope is a lot greater than the density of a rubber hose....
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This note was uploaded on 09/17/2008 for the course PHYS 1200 taught by Professor Stoler during the Spring '06 term at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.

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demo13 - is one single disturbance moving along the medium....

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