Gold Farming

Gold Farming - questionable consequences both for the employees and the American gamers Employees required to spend hours sitting in front of a

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Casey Kinner Anthony W. Rintala English 104-200 October 31, 2007 The Life of the Chinese Gold Farmer: Not So Golden In this article, one of the primary ethical arguments focuses around the perspective of the businessman in a growing business known as Gold Farms. He hires laborers to spend hours playing the virtual game, World of Warcraft. He then sells the results of his employees work (high levels, high ranks, kill points, etc.) to American gamers. To the businessman, this seems a legitimate, morally acceptable business. He provides steady jobs in a highly demanded market to a paying customer. Some frown upon low wages and long hours, but he can’t force unsatisfied employs to work for him. In all fairness, many of these employees need job opportunities and struggle to find work with little education. By providing jobs and a legal trade, this business seems morally good. The Gold farming industry,a growing business in China, causes morally
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Unformatted text preview: questionable consequences both for the employees and the American gamers. Employees, required to spend hours sitting in front of a computer screen, do the dirty work for an industry hauling in nearly $1.8 billion dollars. Business men pay these employees who work eighty to ninety hours a week a mere thirty cents an hour. A fair business? Hardly. The integrity of these virtual computer games, powered by obsessive American gamers, also reaches an all-new low. Instead of earning rankings and levels themselves, gamers rely on the work of others to further themselves in the game. This form of cheating ruins the integrity of the game. A game based on skill level quickly turns to a game based on how much money someone has in their wallet. By treating its employees unreasonably and ruining the integrity of a game, Gold Farms seem an unethical business....
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This note was uploaded on 09/17/2008 for the course ENGL 104 taught by Professor Smith during the Spring '08 term at Texas A&M.

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Gold Farming - questionable consequences both for the employees and the American gamers Employees required to spend hours sitting in front of a

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