ch03a sensation & perception - 1 Sensation&...

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1 Sensation & Perception part A Griggs ch.03
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2 Sensation & Perception experience associated with a sound, light, etc., and the initial steps by which the sense organs and neural pathways take in stimulus information the organization of the information brought in by sensation and its meaningful interpretation
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3 sation- cells in retina of eye respond to ht that hits them ception- person is consciously aware of ing words on an overhead screen ==================================== sation- cells in the ear respond to rations of various strength and quency ception- you are consciously aware of ening to the opening music (Bad Boys) “Cops.”
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4 Physical stimulus physiological response sensory experience Perceptual experience Sensation & Perception
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5 Sensation & Perception Physical stimulus the matter or energy that contacts our sense organs physiological response pattern of electrical activity that occurs in sense organs as a result of a physical stimulus sensory experience subjective sensation of sight, sound, touch, etc. How many senses are there?
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6 Receptor cell a specialized cell that responds to physical stimulus by producing electrical changes that can initiate neural impulses process in which a receptor cell produces a response to a physical stimulus they carry neural impulses from receptor cells to the CNS an electrical charge caused by transduction (lots of partial depolarizations caused by neurons releasing neurotransmitters can activate another neuron. Receptor potentials can also activate a neuron and cause an action potential) Sensation & Perception
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7 Coding the action potentials sent to the brain carry information about the strength and type of stimulus examples type (green light or red light) strength (bright or dim) type (salt or pepper) strength (a lot of salt or a little bit of salt) the type or kind of energy or matter present determined by which neurons are firing the amount or strength of stimulus determined by the rate of firing Sensation & Perception
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8 Sensation & Perception Sensory adaptation a change of sensitivity less stimulus results in more sensitivity more stimulus results in less sensitivity
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