Comm 101 - notes

Comm 101 - notes - 2/25 3/3 Communication Gender Sex Roles...

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2/25, 3/3 - Communication & Gender: Sex Roles Gender Roles 1. normative expectations about the division of labor between the sexes • expectations are how to act “properly” or “normally” NORMS - body type, how to dress, how to talk, etc. 2. gender-related rules bout behavior and comm. that exist within particular cultural-social-historical contexts. Two different gender-role personality traits: • Instrumental - self-direction, self-assertion, goal orientation, control, independence, decisiveness • Expressive - interpersonal orientation and emotional characteristics, such as: kindness, sensitivity, affiliation Biological Sex Differences • Most differences are non-verbal • Men have more special, lateralized brain function - left and right hemispheres tend to not talk to each other • Women have more symmetrical, integrated brain function - hemispheres communicate more • Women smile more, and better at reading emotional behavior • Men are better at navigation Gender Role Communication Differences • Men are more: - refer to quantity ---------- (4ft tall) - judgmental language ---- (stupid) - more “I” references ------ (I did…) - use commands ------------ (write that down.) • Women are more: - refer to emotions --------- (happy, hurt) - uncertainty verbs --------- (it seems to be) - hedges ---------------------- (kind of, sort of) Relational Satisfaction based on whether people are: • matched on instrumentalism and expressiveness - match expressiveness - satisfaction - match instrumentalism - ability to cope with stress • Assumption that stereotypical man and stereotypical women are perfect Study by Magaree Set-up: • college boys and girls told they were to engage in teamwork • before teamwork, they evaluated themselves in terms of dominance -trait • they were then to elect a leader (most dominant person in the group) Result: • Team 1 - had a boy more dominant and boy elected as leader • Team 2 - had a girl more dominant and boy elected as leader Conclusion: • girls were upholding gender-role stereotypes
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Study #1 by Zanna Study #2 by Zanna
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3/5, 3/10 - Interpersonal Attraction General theories of attraction - [non-sexual] Theories of “general sentiment for, or like of, another,” which can lead to sexual attraction and romantic love. • sentiments are emotions like affection, respect Basic assumption of theories of cognitive consistency - [why people start liking each other] People try to keep their cognitions/attitudes (their thoughts about people and objects) in some kind of psychologically consistent relationship with each other. • assumption that: inconsistence is uncomfortable • people try to increase consistency and decrease inconsistency Wrong Assumptions! Liking Sexual Attraction Loving (non-sexual) (sexual) Current Observations: • Liking grows gradually. Romantic love can grow fast. • Liking is relatively stable. Romantic love can be volatile and short.
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  • Spring '07
  • Lieberman
  • Politeness theory, Interpersonal attraction, romantic love, liking Unit Relationship, sexual liking Female, sexual liking Features

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