Chapter 14. Jacksonian Democracy at Flood Tide

Chapter 14. Jacksonian Democracy at Flood Tide - Dan Herber...

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Dan Herber Period 2 Ritter Chapter 14 Jacksonian Democracy at Flood Tide 1830 – 1840 I. “Nullies” in South Carolina The South still hated the Tariff of 1828 In response to the anger at the “Tariff of Abominations,” Congress passed the Tariff of 1832 In 1832, the Nullies came out during the elections and declared the tariff to be nullified in South Carolina territory They threatened to succeed Force Bill, Bloody Bill, was based in order to give the President the ability to collect tariffs with the army and navy Some states did kind of support the South Carolina succession II. A Victory for Both Union and Nullification The Unionists felt that they had won, since Jackson had appeased the South Carolinians and avoided civil war and an armed clash The Nullists felt they won because they got a lower tariff without losing anything III. The Bank as a Political Football Jacksonians distrusted monopolistic banking and oversized businesses When Clay tried to ruin Jackson in 1832, he failed to realize that the West was
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Chapter 14. Jacksonian Democracy at Flood Tide - Dan Herber...

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