Union Avoidance Chapter - Union Avoidance Rationale...

This preview shows page 1 - 3 out of 22 pages.

We have textbook solutions for you!
The document you are viewing contains questions related to this textbook.
Microeconomics
The document you are viewing contains questions related to this textbook.
Chapter 14 / Exercise 5
Microeconomics
Arnold
Expert Verified
Union Avoidance: Rationale, Strategies, and Practices Chapter 6 examined union organizing campaigns . The chapter covered the flow of events associated with a campaign, union strategies and tactics, management responses, the roles of the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) and the National Mediation Board (NMB), and the factors influ- encing election outcomes. At several points, the chapter emphasized that, except in isolated instances, most employers strongly resist organizing drives. In this chapter we explore in greater depth the reasons for em.players' resistance, strategies that employers are using to create and maintain a "union-free" employment environment, tactics that they use to prevent union success in organizing, the role of decertifications in deunionizing partially unionized employers, and the effects of organizational and job structuring on limiting unionization within employers. As you study this chapter, consider the following questions: 1. Are employers increasing or decreasing their opposition to unions in the current era? What evidence is there to support your position? 2. What are the economic effects of initial unionization on the employer? 3. What factors are related to an employer avoiding unionization? 4. If an employer faces an organizing campaign, what strategies and tactics are included in a typical employer respuH::>e? 5. What is a decertification election, and how does it differ from other NLRB elections?
We have textbook solutions for you!
The document you are viewing contains questions related to this textbook.
Microeconomics
The document you are viewing contains questions related to this textbook.
Chapter 14 / Exercise 5
Microeconomics
Arnold
Expert Verified
198 Labor Relations HISTORICAL OVERVIEW The business and labor history of the United States, going back to the Philadelphia Cordwainers, is replete with examples of employer resistance to unionization. The fundamental differences in philosophies, goals, and values of capitalists and trade unionists make this resistance inevitable and make employer accommodation after unionization sometimes difficult. Capitalistic and Trade Union Philosophies Capitalists (either entrP.pn~neurs or investor-owned corporations) use their resources to creale mechanisms (productive processes) that will enable them to develop and sell goods and services in the marketplace at prices great enough to yield a higher return than that from other alternative investments. Employees are hired to produce the output. Employees are generally free to leave at any time, and capitalists would like to have the freedom to hire or terminate them, individually or collectively, as neces-sary to achieve their business purposes. Capitalists assume the risk that they will not be able to realize a positive yield from their investments and ideas. If they fail, their investments will be diminished or lost. They also expect that if they are successful in the marketplace (i.e., their returns are greater than they might realize through riskless investment) they will be able to retain their profits as a reward for taking the risk. Trade unionists believe that wealth is ultimately created by the workers who produce the products or deliver the services to the consumer. In cases where the firm is successful in the market (i.e., it makes a profit), unions attribute a large measure of the success to the efforts of employees. Their actions are seen as ultimately adding the value to the inputs that make the products and services attractive in the market. From a union perspec-tive, these gains need to be shared with the employees. While employers would like complete freedom lo hire, fire, and assign workers to jobs, unions see employees as becoming increasingly

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture