Chapter02 - Chapter 2: Force 1. Force Force Loosely defined...

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Unformatted text preview: Chapter 2: Force 1. Force Force Loosely defined as “pushing” or “pulling.” An influence that may cause a body to accelerate Vector Quantity Unit : N = kg m/s 2 Long-range force and contact force → See 2.6-2.8 Fundamental forces → See 2.9 Vector quantity : has both magnitude and direction (physical direction in space) Push how much in what direction ? Examples) Force, velocity, acceleration Scalar quantity has only magnitude Example) mass, temperature, speed Representation of a vector: Magnitude of a vector: Negative vector : A r | | A A = r A- r 2. Net Force Addition of scalar quantities Addition of vector quantities Mathematically simple, but in realty it is not. 1 2 net i n i m m m m m = = + + + L 1 2 net i n i F F F F F = = + + + r r r r r L Addition of vectors Graphical method Head-to-tail Parallelogram By components → See 2.4 Graphical method Two parallel vectors Head-to-tail method of non-parallel vectors ( Note you need to draw an arrow from the tail of the first vector to the head of the last vector ) You can move a vector to any where as long as it points the same direction and has the same magnitude. You may apply the same method when adding more than two vectors Parallelogram method 3. Inertia and Equilibrium : Newton’s laws of motion The First law of motion : The law of inertia “An object at rest will remain at rest unless acted upon by an external and unbalanced force. An object in motion will remain in motion unless acted upon by an external and unbalanced force.”external and unbalanced force....
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This note was uploaded on 09/10/2008 for the course PHYS 2205 taught by Professor Damazilu during the Fall '08 term at Virginia Tech.

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Chapter02 - Chapter 2: Force 1. Force Force Loosely defined...

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