HIV and Hepatitis B - HIV\/AIDS-Related Opportunistic Infections and Coinfections HIV and Hepatitis B Key Points Hepatitis B is a liver disease caused by

HIV and Hepatitis B - HIV/AIDS-Related Opportunistic...

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HIV/AIDS-Related Opportunistic Infections and Coinfections HIV and Hepatitis B Key Points Hepatitis B is a liver disease caused by the hepatitis B virus (HBV). HBV is spread through contact with the blood, semen, or other body fluid of a person infected with HBV. Among adults in the United States, HBV is spread mainly through sexual contact. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) , approximately 10% of people with HIV in the United States are also infected with HBV. Infection with both HIV and HBV is called HIV/HBV coinfection. People with HIV/HBV coinfection should be treated for both diseases. What is hepatitis B? Hepatitis B is a liver disease caused by the hepatitis B virus (HBV). The abbreviation HBV can stand for either the virus or the disease it causes. HBV can be a short-term (acute) or a long-term (chronic) illness: Acute HBV occurs within 6 months after a person is exposed to HBV. Acute HBV can (but does not always) lead to chronic HBV. Chronic HBV is a lifelong disease. Without treatment, chronic HBV can cause liver cancer or liver damage that leads to liver failure. HBV is a contagious disease that can spread from person to person. How does HBV spread from person to person? HBV is spread through contact with the blood, semen, or other body fluid of a person infected with HBV. Among adults in the United States, HBV is spread mainly through sexual contact.
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  • Fall '17
  • Najeeb
  • Hepatitis C, HBV, chronic hbv

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