Fundamentals.of.physics_halliday

Fundamentals.of.Physics_Halliday
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Unformatted text preview: P U Z Z L E R For thousands of years the spinning Earth provided a natural standard for our measurements of time. However, since 1972 we have added more than 20 "leap seconds" to our clocks to keep them synchronized to the Earth. Why are such adjustments needed? What does it take to be a good standard? (Don Mason/The Stock Market and NASA) c h a p t e r Physics and Measurement Chapter Outline 1.1 Standards of Length, Mass, and Time 1.5 Conversion of Units 1.6 Estimates and Order-of-Magnitude Calculations 1.2 The Building Blocks of Matter 1.3 Density 1.4 Dimensional Analysis 1.7 Significant Figures 2 L ike all other sciences, physics is based on experimental observations and quantitative measurements. The main objective of physics is to find the limited number of fundamental laws that govern natural phenomena and to use them to develop theories that can predict the results of future experiments. The fundamental laws used in developing theories are expressed in the language of mathematics, the tool that provides a bridge between theory and experiment. When a discrepancy between theory and experiment arises, new theories must be formulated to remove the discrepancy. Many times a theory is satisfactory only under limited conditions; a more general theory might be satisfactory without such limitations. For example, the laws of motion discovered by Isaac Newton (1642 1727) in the 17th century accurately describe the motion of bodies at normal speeds but do not apply to objects moving at speeds comparable with the speed of light. In contrast, the special theory of relativity developed by Albert Einstein (1879 1955) in the early 1900s gives the same results as Newton's laws at low speeds but also correctly describes motion at speeds approaching the speed of light. Hence, Einstein's is a more general theory of motion. Classical physics, which means all of the physics developed before 1900, includes the theories, concepts, laws, and experiments in classical mechanics, thermodynamics, and electromagnetism. Important contributions to classical physics were provided by Newton, who developed classical mechanics as a systematic theory and was one of the originators of calculus as a mathematical tool. Major developments in mechanics continued in the 18th century, but the fields of thermodynamics and electricity and magnetism were not developed until the latter part of the 19th century, principally because before that time the apparatus for controlled experiments was either too crude or unavailable. A new era in physics, usually referred to as modern physics, began near the end of the 19th century. Modern physics developed mainly because of the discovery that many physical phenomena could not be explained by classical physics. The two most important developments in modern physics were the theories of relativity and quantum mechanics. Einstein's theory of relativity revolutionized the traditional concepts of space, time, and energy; quantum mechanics, which applies to both the microscopic and macroscopic worlds, was originally formulated by a number of distinguished scientists to provide descriptions of physical phenomena at the atomic level. Scientists constantly work at improving our understanding of phenomena and fundamental laws, and new discoveries are made every day. In many research areas, a great deal of overlap exists between physics, chemistry, geology, and biology, as well as engineering. Some of the most notable developments are (1) numerous space missions and the landing of astronauts on the Moon, (2) microcircuitry and high-speed computers, and (3) sophisticated imaging techniques used in scientific research and medicine. The impact such developments and discoveries have had on our society has indeed been great, and it is very likely that future discoveries and developments will be just as exciting and challenging and of great benefit to humanity. 1.1 STANDARDS OF LENGTH, MASS, AND TIME The laws of physics are expressed in terms of basic quantities that require a clear definition. In mechanics, the three basic quantities are length (L), mass (M), and time (T). All other quantities in mechanics can be expressed in terms of these three. 3 4 CHAPTER 1 Physics and Measurements If we are to report the results of a measurement to someone who wishes to reproduce this measurement, a standard must be defined. It would be meaningless if a visitor from another planet were to talk to us about a length of 8 "glitches" if we do not know the meaning of the unit glitch. On the other hand, if someone familiar with our system of measurement reports that a wall is 2 meters high and our unit of length is defined to be 1 meter, we know that the height of the wall is twice our basic length unit. Likewise, if we are told that a person has a mass of 75 kilograms and our unit of mass is defined to be 1 kilogram, then that person is 75 times as massive as our basic unit.1 Whatever is chosen as a standard must be readily accessible and possess some property that can be measured reliably -- measurements taken by different people in different places must yield the same result. In 1960, an international committee established a set of standards for length, mass, and other basic quantities. The system established is an adaptation of the metric system, and it is called the SI system of units. (The abbreviation SI comes from the system's French name "Systme International.") In this system, the units of length, mass, and time are the meter, kilogram, and second, respectively. Other SI standards established by the committee are those for temperature (the kelvin), electric current (the ampere), luminous intensity (the candela), and the amount of substance (the mole). In our study of mechanics we shall be concerned only with the units of length, mass, and time. Length In A.D. 1120 the king of England decreed that the standard of length in his country would be named the yard and would be precisely equal to the distance from the tip of his nose to the end of his outstretched arm. Similarly, the original standard for the foot adopted by the French was the length of the royal foot of King Louis XIV. This standard prevailed until 1799, when the legal standard of length in France became the meter, defined as one ten-millionth the distance from the equator to the North Pole along one particular longitudinal line that passes through Paris. Many other systems for measuring length have been developed over the years, but the advantages of the French system have caused it to prevail in almost all countries and in scientific circles everywhere. As recently as 1960, the length of the meter was defined as the distance between two lines on a specific platinum iridium bar stored under controlled conditions in France. This standard was abandoned for several reasons, a principal one being that the limited accuracy with which the separation between the lines on the bar can be determined does not meet the current requirements of science and technology. In the 1960s and 1970s, the meter was defined as 1 650 763.73 wavelengths of orange-red light emitted from a krypton-86 lamp. However, in October 1983, the meter (m) was redefined as the distance traveled by light in vacuum during a time of 1/299 792 458 second. In effect, this latest definition establishes that the speed of light in vacuum is precisely 299 792 458 m per second. Table 1.1 lists approximate values of some measured lengths. 1 The need for assigning numerical values to various measured physical quantities was expressed by Lord Kelvin (William Thomson) as follows: "I often say that when you can measure what you are speaking about, and express it in numbers, you should know something about it, but when you cannot express it in numbers, your knowledge is of a meagre and unsatisfactory kind. It may be the beginning of knowledge but you have scarcely in your thoughts advanced to the state of science." 1.1 Standards of Length, Mass, and Time 5 TABLE 1.1 Approximate Values of Some Measured Lengths Length (m) Distance from the Earth to most remote known quasar Distance from the Earth to most remote known normal galaxies Distance from the Earth to nearest large galaxy (M 31, the Andromeda galaxy) Distance from the Sun to nearest star (Proxima Centauri) One lightyear Mean orbit radius of the Earth about the Sun Mean distance from the Earth to the Moon Distance from the equator to the North Pole Mean radius of the Earth Typical altitude (above the surface) of a satellite orbiting the Earth Length of a football field Length of a housefly Size of smallest dust particles Size of cells of most living organisms Diameter of a hydrogen atom Diameter of an atomic nucleus Diameter of a proton 1.4 9 2 4 9.46 1.50 3.84 1.00 6.37 2 9.1 5 10 10 10 10 10 1026 1025 1022 1016 1015 1011 108 107 106 105 101 10 3 4 5 10 14 15 Mass The basic SI unit of mass, the kilogram (kg), is defined as the mass of a specific platinum iridium alloy cylinder kept at the International Bureau of Weights and Measures at Svres, France. This mass standard was established in 1887 and has not been changed since that time because platinum iridium is an unusually stable alloy (Fig. 1.1a). A duplicate of the Svres cylinder is kept at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) in Gaithersburg, Maryland. Table 1.2 lists approximate values of the masses of various objects. web Visit the Bureau at www.bipm.fr or the National Institute of Standards at www.NIST.gov TABLE 1.2 Time Before 1960, the standard of time was defined in terms of the mean solar day for the 1 1 1 year 1900.2 The mean solar second was originally defined as (60)(60)(24) of a mean solar day. The rotation of the Earth is now known to vary slightly with time, however, and therefore this motion is not a good one to use for defining a standard. In 1967, consequently, the second was redefined to take advantage of the high precision obtainable in a device known as an atomic clock (Fig. 1.1b). In this device, the frequencies associated with certain atomic transitions can be measured to a precision of one part in 1012. This is equivalent to an uncertainty of less than one second every 30 000 years. Thus, in 1967 the SI unit of time, the second, was redefined using the characteristic frequency of a particular kind of cesium atom as the "reference clock." The basic SI unit of time, the second (s), is defined as 9 192 631 770 times the period of vibration of radiation from the cesium-133 atom.3 To keep these atomic clocks -- and therefore all common clocks and 2 Masses of Various Bodies (Approximate Values) Body Visible Universe Milky Way galaxy Sun Earth Moon Horse Human Frog Mosquito Bacterium Hydrogen atom Electron Mass (kg) 1052 7 1.99 5.98 7.36 1041 1030 1024 1022 103 102 10 1 10 5 10 15 1.67 10 9.11 10 27 31 One solar day is the time interval between successive appearances of the Sun at the highest point it reaches in the sky each day. Period is defined as the time interval needed for one complete vibration. 3 6 CHAPTER 1 Physics and Measurements Figure 1.1 (Top) The National Standard Kilogram No. 20, an accurate copy of the International Standard Kilogram kept at Svres, France, is housed under a double bell jar in a vault at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). (Bottom) The primary frequency standard (an atomic clock) at the NIST. This device keeps time with an accuracy of about 3 millionths of a second per year. (Courtesy of National Institute of Standards and Technology, U.S. Department of Commerce) watches that are set to them -- synchronized, it has sometimes been necessary to add leap seconds to our clocks. This is not a new idea. In 46 B.C. Julius Caesar began the practice of adding extra days to the calendar during leap years so that the seasons occurred at about the same date each year. Since Einstein's discovery of the linkage between space and time, precise measurement of time intervals requires that we know both the state of motion of the clock used to measure the interval and, in some cases, the location of the clock as well. Otherwise, for example, global positioning system satellites might be unable to pinpoint your location with sufficient accuracy, should you need rescuing. Approximate values of time intervals are presented in Table 1.3. In addition to SI, another system of units, the British engineering system (sometimes called the conventional system), is still used in the United States despite acceptance of SI by the rest of the world. In this system, the units of length, mass, and 1.1 Standards of Length, Mass, and Time 7 TABLE 1.3 Approximate Values of Some Time Intervals Interval (s) Age of the Universe Age of the Earth Average age of a college student One year One day (time for one rotation of the Earth about its axis) Time between normal heartbeats Period of audible sound waves Period of typical radio waves Period of vibration of an atom in a solid Period of visible light waves Duration of a nuclear collision Time for light to cross a proton 5 1.3 6.3 3.16 8.64 8 10 10 10 10 10 10 1017 1017 108 107 104 10 1 3 6 13 15 22 24 time are the foot (ft), slug, and second, respectively. In this text we shall use SI units because they are almost universally accepted in science and industry. We shall make some limited use of British engineering units in the study of classical mechanics. In addition to the basic SI units of meter, kilogram, and second, we can also use other units, such as millimeters and nanoseconds, where the prefixes milli- and nano- denote various powers of ten. Some of the most frequently used prefixes for the various powers of ten and their abbreviations are listed in Table 1.4. For TABLE 1.4 Prefixes for SI Units Power 10 24 10 21 10 18 10 15 10 12 10 9 10 6 10 3 10 2 10 1 101 103 106 109 1012 1015 1018 1021 1024 Prefix yocto zepto atto femto pico nano micro milli centi deci deka kilo mega giga tera peta exa zetta yotta Abbreviation y z a f p n m c d da k M G T P E Z Y 8 CHAPTER 1 Physics and Measurements example, 10 3 m is equivalent to 1 millimeter (mm), and 103 m corresponds to 1 kilometer (km). Likewise, 1 kg is 103 grams (g), and 1 megavolt (MV) is 106 volts (V). u u 1.2 Quark composition of a proton THE BUILDING BLOCKS OF MATTER d Proton Neutron Gold nucleus Nucleus Gold atoms Gold cube Figure 1.2 Levels of organization in matter. Ordinary matter consists of atoms, and at the center of each atom is a compact nucleus consisting of protons and neutrons. Protons and neutrons are composed of quarks. The quark composition of a proton is shown. A 1-kg cube of solid gold has a length of 3.73 cm on a side. Is this cube nothing but wall-to-wall gold, with no empty space? If the cube is cut in half, the two pieces still retain their chemical identity as solid gold. But what if the pieces are cut again and again, indefinitely? Will the smaller and smaller pieces always be gold? Questions such as these can be traced back to early Greek philosophers. Two of them -- Leucippus and his student Democritus -- could not accept the idea that such cuttings could go on forever. They speculated that the process ultimately must end when it produces a particle that can no longer be cut. In Greek, atomos means "not sliceable." From this comes our English word atom. Let us review briefly what is known about the structure of matter. All ordinary matter consists of atoms, and each atom is made up of electrons surrounding a central nucleus. Following the discovery of the nucleus in 1911, the question arose: Does it have structure? That is, is the nucleus a single particle or a collection of particles? The exact composition of the nucleus is not known completely even today, but by the early 1930s a model evolved that helped us understand how the nucleus behaves. Specifically, scientists determined that occupying the nucleus are two basic entities, protons and neutrons. The proton carries a positive charge, and a specific element is identified by the number of protons in its nucleus. This number is called the atomic number of the element. For instance, the nucleus of a hydrogen atom contains one proton (and so the atomic number of hydrogen is 1), the nucleus of a helium atom contains two protons (atomic number 2), and the nucleus of a uranium atom contains 92 protons (atomic number 92). In addition to atomic number, there is a second number characterizing atoms -- mass number, defined as the number of protons plus neutrons in a nucleus. As we shall see, the atomic number of an element never varies (i.e., the number of protons does not vary) but the mass number can vary (i.e., the number of neutrons varies). Two or more atoms of the same element having different mass numbers are isotopes of one another. The existence of neutrons was verified conclusively in 1932. A neutron has no charge and a mass that is about equal to that of a proton. One of its primary purposes is to act as a "glue" that holds the nucleus together. If neutrons were not present in the nucleus, the repulsive force between the positively charged particles would cause the nucleus to come apart. But is this where the breaking down stops? Protons, neutrons, and a host of other exotic particles are now known to be composed of six different varieties of particles called quarks, which have been given the names of up, down, strange, 2 charm, bottom, and top. The up, charm, and top quarks have charges of 3 that of the proton, whereas the down, strange, and bottom quarks have charges of 1 3 that of the proton. The proton consists of two up quarks and one down quark (Fig. 1.2), which you can easily show leads to the correct charge for the proton. Likewise, the neutron consists of two down quarks and one up quark, giving a net charge of zero. 1.3 Density 9 1.3 DENSITY A table of the letters in the Greek alphabet is provided on the back endsheet of this textbook. A property of any substance is its density (Greek letter rho), defined as the amount of mass contained in a unit volume, which we usually express as mass per unit volume: m V (1.1) For example, aluminum has a density of 2.70 g/cm3, and lead has a density of 11.3 g/cm3. Therefore, a piece of aluminum of volume 10.0 cm3 has a mass of 27.0 g, whereas an equivalent volume of lead has a mass of 113 g. A list of densities for various substances is given Table 1.5. The difference in density between aluminum and lead is due, in part, to their different atomic masses. The atomic mass of an element is the average mass of one atom in a sample of the element that contains all the element's isotopes, where the relative amounts of isotopes are the same as the relative amounts found in nature. The unit for atomic mass is the atomic mass unit (u), where 1 u 1.660 540 2 10 27 kg. The atomic mass of lead is 207 u, and that of aluminum is 27.0 u. However, the ratio of atomic masses, 207 u/27.0 u 7.67, does not correspond to the ratio of densities, (11.3 g/cm3)/(2.70 g/cm3) 4.19. The discrepancy is due to the difference in atomic separations and atomic arrangements in the crystal structure of these two substances. The mass of a nucleus is measured relative to the mass of the nucleus of the carbon-12 isotope, often written as 12C. (This isotope of carbon has six protons and six neutrons. Other carbon isotopes have six protons but different numbers of neutrons.) Practically all of the mass of an atom is contained within the nucleus. Because the atomic mass of 12C is defined to be exactly 12 u, the proton and neutron each have a mass of about 1 u. One mole (mol) of a substance is that amount of the substance that contains as many particles (atoms, molecules, or other particles) as there are atoms in 12 g of the carbon-12 isotope. One mole of substance A contains the same number of particles as there are in 1 mol of any other substance B. For example, 1 mol of aluminum contains the same number of atoms as 1 mol of lead. TABLE 1.5 Densities of Various Substances Substance Gold Uranium Lead Copper Iron Aluminum Magnesium Water Air Density (103 kg/m3) 19.3 18.7 11.3 8.92 7.86 2.70 1.75 1.00 0.0012 10 CHAPTER 1 Physics and Measurements Experiments have shown that this number, known as Avogadro's number, NA , is NA 6.022 137 10 23 particles/mol Avogadro's number is defined so that 1 mol of carbon-12 atoms has a mass of exactly 12 g. In general, the mass in 1 mol of any element is the element's atomic mass expressed in grams. For example, 1 mol of iron (atomic mass 55.85 u) has a mass of 55.85 g (we say its molar mass is 55.85 g/mol), and 1 mol of lead (atomic mass 207 u) has a mass of 207 g (its molar mass is 207 g/mol). Because there are 6.02 1023 particles in 1 mol of any element, the mass per atom for a given element is m atom molar mass NA (1.2) For example, the mass of an iron atom is m Fe 55.85 g/mol 6.02 10 23 atoms/mol 9.28 10 23 g/atom EXAMPLE 1.1 How Many Atoms in the Cube? minum (27 g) contains 6.02 1023 atoms: NA 27 g 6.02 (0.54 g)(6.02 27 g 10 23 atoms 27 g 10 23 atoms) N 0.54 g N 0.54 g 1.2 10 22 atoms A solid cube of aluminum (density 2.7 g/cm3) has a volume of 0.20 cm3. How many aluminum atoms are contained in the cube? Solution Since density equals mass per unit volume, the mass m of the cube is m V (2.7 g/cm3)(0.20 cm3) 0.54 g N To find the number of atoms N in this mass of aluminum, we can set up a proportion using the fact that one mole of alu- 1.4 DIMENSIONAL ANALYSIS The word dimension has a special meaning in physics. It usually denotes the physical nature of a quantity. Whether a distance is measured in the length unit feet or the length unit meters, it is still a distance. We say the dimension -- the physical nature -- of distance is length. The symbols we use in this book to specify length, mass, and time are L, M, and T, respectively. We shall often use brackets [ ] to denote the dimensions of a physical quantity. For example, the symbol we use for speed in this book is v, and in our notation the dimensions of speed are written [v] L/T. As another example, the dimensions of area, for which we use the symbol A, are [A] L2. The dimensions of area, volume, speed, and acceleration are listed in Table 1.6. In solving problems in physics, there is a useful and powerful procedure called dimensional analysis. This procedure, which should always be used, will help minimize the need for rote memorization of equations. Dimensional analysis makes use of the fact that dimensions can be treated as algebraic quantities. That is, quantities can be added or subtracted only if they have the same dimensions. Furthermore, the terms on both sides of an equation must have the same dimensions. 1.4 Dimensional Analysis 11 TABLE 1.6 Dimensions and Common Units of Area, Volume, Speed, and Acceleration System SI British engineering Area (L2) m2 ft2 Volume (L3) m3 ft3 Speed (L/T) m/s ft/s Acceleration (L/T 2) m/s2 ft/s2 By following these simple rules, you can use dimensional analysis to help determine whether an expression has the correct form. The relationship can be correct only if the dimensions are the same on both sides of the equation. To illustrate this procedure, suppose you wish to derive a formula for the distance x traveled by a car in a time t if the car starts from rest and moves with constant acceleration a. In Chapter 2, we shall find that the correct expression is x 1at 2. Let us use dimensional analysis to check the validity of this expression. 2 The quantity x on the left side has the dimension of length. For the equation to be dimensionally correct, the quantity on the right side must also have the dimension of length. We can perform a dimensional check by substituting the dimensions for acceleration, L/T 2, and time, T, into the equation. That is, the dimensional form of the equation x 1at 2 is 2 L L T2 T2 L The units of time squared cancel as shown, leaving the unit of length. A more general procedure using dimensional analysis is to set up an expression of the form x a nt m where n and m are exponents that must be determined and the symbol indicates a proportionality. This relationship is correct only if the dimensions of both sides are the same. Because the dimension of the left side is length, the dimension of the right side must also be length. That is, [a nt m] L LT 0 Because the dimensions of acceleration are L/T 2 and the dimension of time is T, we have L T2 n Tm 2n L1 L1 Ln T m Because the exponents of L and T must be the same on both sides, the dimensional equation is balanced under the conditions m 2n 0, n 1, and m 2. Returning to our original expression x a nt mwe conclude that x , at 2This result . 1 2 differs by a factor of 2 from the correct expression, which is x 2at . Because the factor 1 is dimensionless, there is no way of determining it using dimensional 2 analysis. 12 CHAPTER 1 Physics and Measurements Quick Quiz 1.1 True or False: Dimensional analysis can give you the numerical value of constants of proportionality that may appear in an algebraic expression. EXAMPLE 1.2 Analysis of an Equation The same table gives us L/T 2 for the dimensions of acceleration, and so the dimensions of at are [at] L (T) T2 L T Show that the expression v at is dimensionally correct, where v represents speed, a acceleration, and t a time interval. Solution For the speed term, we have from Table 1.6 [v] L T Therefore, the expression is dimensionally correct. (If the expression were given as v at 2, it would be dimensionally incorrect. Try it and see!) EXAMPLE 1.3 Analysis of a Power Law This dimensional equation is balanced under the conditions n Therefore n sion as m 1 and m 2 Suppose we are told that the acceleration a of a particle moving with uniform speed v in a circle of radius r is proportional to some power of r, say r n, and some power of v, say v m. How can we determine the values of n and m? 1, and we can write the acceleration expresv2 r Solution Let us take a to be a kr nv m a kr 1v 2 k where k is a dimensionless constant of proportionality. Knowing the dimensions of a, r, and v, we see that the dimensional equation must be L/T 2 Ln(L/T)m Ln m/T m When we discuss uniform circular motion later, we shall see that k 1 if a consistent set of units is used. The constant k would not equal 1 if, for example, v were in km/h and you wanted a in m/s2. QuickLab Estimate the weight (in pounds) of two large bottles of soda pop. Note that 1 L of water has a mass of about 1 kg. Use the fact that an object weighing 2.2 lb has a mass of 1 kg. Find some bathroom scales and check your estimate. 1.5 CONVERSION OF UNITS Sometimes it is necessary to convert units from one system to another. Conversion factors between the SI units and conventional units of length are as follows: 1 mi 1m 1 609 m 39.37 in. 1.609 km 3.281 ft 1 ft 1 in. 0.304 8 m 0.025 4 m 30.48 cm 2.54 cm (exactly) A more complete list of conversion factors can be found in Appendix A. Units can be treated as algebraic quantities that can cancel each other. For example, suppose we wish to convert 15.0 in. to centimeters. Because 1 in. is defined as exactly 2.54 cm, we find that 15.0 in. (15.0 in.)(2.54 cm/in.) 38.1 cm This works because multiplying by (2.54 cm) is the same as multiplying by 1, because 1 in. the numerator and denominator describe identical things. 1.6 Estimates and Order-of-Magnitude Calculations 13 (Left) This road sign near Raleigh, North Carolina, shows distances in miles and kilometers. How accurate are the conversions? (Billy E. Barnes/Stock Boston). (Right) This vehicle's speedometer gives speed readings in miles per hour and in kilometers per hour. Try confirming the conversion between the two sets of units for a few readings of the dial. (Paul Silverman/Fundamental Photographs) EXAMPLE 1.4 The Density of a Cube V Therefore, m, the m V 0.856 kg 1.53 10 4 The mass of a solid cube is 856 g, and each edge has a length of 5.35 cm. Determine the density of the cube in basic SI units. L3 (5.35 cm 10 6 10 m3 2 m/cm)3 10 4 (5.35)3 1.53 m3 Solution Because 1 g 10 3 kg and 1 cm mass m and volume V in basic SI units are m 856 g 10 3 10 2 kg/g 0.856 kg m3 5.59 10 3 kg/m3 1.6 ESTIMATES AND ORDER-OFMAGNITUDE CALCULATIONS It is often useful to compute an approximate answer to a physical problem even where little information is available. Such an approximate answer can then be used to determine whether a more accurate calculation is necessary. Approximations are usually based on certain assumptions, which must be modified if greater accuracy is needed. Thus, we shall sometimes refer to the order of magnitude of a certain quantity as the power of ten of the number that describes that quantity. If, for example, we say that a quantity increases in value by three orders of magnitude, this means that its value is increased by a factor of 103 1000. Also, if a quantity is given as 3 103, we say that the order of magnitude of that quantity is 103 (or in symbolic form, 3 103 103). Likewise, the quantity 8 107 108. The spirit of order-of-magnitude calculations, sometimes referred to as "guesstimates" or "ball-park figures," is given in the following quotation: "Make an estimate before every calculation, try a simple physical argument . . . before every derivation, guess the answer to every puzzle. Courage: no one else needs to 14 CHAPTER 1 Physics and Measurements know what the guess is." 4 Inaccuracies caused by guessing too low for one number are often canceled out by other guesses that are too high. You will find that with practice your guesstimates get better and better. Estimation problems can be fun to work as you freely drop digits, venture reasonable approximations for unknown numbers, make simplifying assumptions, and turn the question around into something you can answer in your head. EXAMPLE 1.5 Breaths in a Lifetime approximately 1 yr 400 days yr 25 h day 60 min h 6 105 min Estimate the number of breaths taken during an average life span. Solution We shall start by guessing that the typical life span is about 70 years. The only other estimate we must make in this example is the average number of breaths that a person takes in 1 min. This number varies, depending on whether the person is exercising, sleeping, angry, serene, and so forth. To the nearest order of magnitude, we shall choose 10 breaths per minute as our estimate of the average. (This is certainly closer to the true value than 1 breath per minute or 100 breaths per minute.) The number of minutes in a year is Notice how much simpler it is to multiply 400 25 than it is to work with the more accurate 365 24. These approximate values for the number of days in a year and the number of hours in a day are close enough for our purposes. Thus, in 70 years there will be (70 yr)(6 105 min/yr) 4 107 min. At a rate of 10 breaths/min, an individual would take 4 10 8 breaths in a lifetime. EXAMPLE 1.6 It's a Long Way to San Jose Now we switch to scientific notation so that we can do the calculation mentally: (3 10 3 mi)(2.5 10 3 steps/mi) 7.5 10 6 steps Estimate the number of steps a person would take walking from New York to Los Angeles. Solution Without looking up the distance between these two cities, you might remember from a geography class that they are about 3 000 mi apart. The next approximation we must make is the length of one step. Of course, this length depends on the person doing the walking, but we can estimate that each step covers about 2 ft. With our estimated step size, we can determine the number of steps in 1 mi. Because this is a rough calculation, we round 5 280 ft/mi to 5 000 ft/mi. (What percentage error does this introduce?) This conversion factor gives us 5 000 ft/mi 2 ft/step 2 500 steps/mi 10 7 steps So if we intend to walk across the United States, it will take us on the order of ten million steps. This estimate is almost certainly too small because we have not accounted for curving roads and going up and down hills and mountains. Nonetheless, it is probably within an order of magnitude of the correct answer. EXAMPLE 1.7 How Much Gas Do We Use? age distance each car travels per year is 10 000 mi. If we assume a gasoline consumption of 20 mi/gal or 0.05 gal/mi, then each car uses about 500 gal/yr. Multiplying this by the total number of cars in the United States gives an estimated total consumption of 5 1010 gal 10 11 gal. Estimate the number of gallons of gasoline used each year by all the cars in the United States. Solution There are about 270 million people in the United States, and so we estimate that the number of cars in the country is 100 million (guessing that there are between two and three people per car). We also estimate that the aver- 4 E. Taylor and J. A. Wheeler, Spacetime Physics, San Francisco, W. H. Freeman & Company, Publishers, 1966, p. 60. 1.7 Significant Figures 15 1.7 SIGNIFICANT FIGURES When physical quantities are measured, the measured values are known only to within the limits of the experimental uncertainty. The value of this uncertainty can depend on various factors, such as the quality of the apparatus, the skill of the experimenter, and the number of measurements performed. Suppose that we are asked to measure the area of a computer disk label using a meter stick as a measuring instrument. Let us assume that the accuracy to which we can measure with this stick is 0.1 cm. If the length of the label is measured to be 5.5 cm, we can claim only that its length lies somewhere between 5.4 cm and 5.6 cm. In this case, we say that the measured value has two significant figures. Likewise, if the label's width is measured to be 6.4 cm, the actual value lies between 6.3 cm and 6.5 cm. Note that the significant figures include the first estimated digit. Thus we could write the measured values as (5.5 0.1) cm and (6.4 0.1) cm. Now suppose we want to find the area of the label by multiplying the two measured values. If we were to claim the area is (5.5 cm)(6.4 cm) 35.2 cm2, our answer would be unjustifiable because it contains three significant figures, which is greater than the number of significant figures in either of the measured lengths. A good rule of thumb to use in determining the number of significant figures that can be claimed is as follows: When multiplying several quantities, the number of significant figures in the final answer is the same as the number of significant figures in the least accurate of the quantities being multiplied, where "least accurate" means "having the lowest number of significant figures." The same rule applies to division. Applying this rule to the multiplication example above, we see that the answer for the area can have only two significant figures because our measured lengths have only two significant figures. Thus, all we can claim is that the area is 35 cm2, realizing that the value can range between (5.4 cm)(6.3 cm) 34 cm2 and (5.6 cm)(6.5 cm) 36 cm2. Zeros may or may not be significant figures. Those used to position the decimal point in such numbers as 0.03 and 0.007 5 are not significant. Thus, there are one and two significant figures, respectively, in these two values. When the zeros come after other digits, however, there is the possibility of misinterpretation. For example, suppose the mass of an object is given as 1 500 g. This value is ambiguous because we do not know whether the last two zeros are being used to locate the decimal point or whether they represent significant figures in the measurement. To remove this ambiguity, it is common to use scientific notation to indicate the number of significant figures. In this case, we would express the mass as 1.5 103 g if there are two significant figures in the measured value, 1.50 103 g if there are three significant figures, and 1.500 103 g if there are four. The same rule holds when the number is less than 1, so that 2.3 10 4 has two significant figures (and so could be written 0.000 23) and 2.30 10 4 has three significant figures (also written 0.000 230). In general, a significant figure is a reliably known digit (other than a zero used to locate the decimal point). For addition and subtraction, you must consider the number of decimal places when you are determining how many significant figures to report. QuickLab Determine the thickness of a page from this book. (Note that numbers that have no measurement errors -- like the count of a number of pages -- do not affect the significant figures in a calculation.) In terms of significant figures, why is it better to measure the thickness of as many pages as possible and then divide by the number of sheets? 16 CHAPTER 1 Physics and Measurements When numbers are added or subtracted, the number of decimal places in the result should equal the smallest number of decimal places of any term in the sum. For example, if we wish to compute 123 5.35, the answer given to the correct number of significant figures is 128 and not 128.35. If we compute the sum 1.000 1 0.000 3 1.000 4, the result has five significant figures, even though one of the terms in the sum, 0.000 3, has only one significant figure. Likewise, if we perform the subtraction 1.002 0.998 0.004, the result has only one significant figure even though one term has four significant figures and the other has three. In this book, most of the numerical examples and end-of-chapter problems will yield answers having three significant figures. When carrying out estimates we shall typically work with a single significant figure. Quick Quiz 1.2 Suppose you measure the position of a chair with a meter stick and record that the center of the seat is 1.043 860 564 2 m from a wall. What would a reader conclude from this recorded measurement? EXAMPLE 1.8 The Area of a Rectangle (21.3 (209 9.80 21.3 0.1 0.2 9.80) cm2 A rectangular plate has a length of (21.3 0.2) cm and a width of (9.80 0.1) cm. Find the area of the plate and the uncertainty in the calculated area. 4) cm2 Solution Area w (21.3 0.2 cm) (9.80 0.1 cm) Because the input data were given to only three significant figures, we cannot claim any more in our result. Do you see why we did not need to multiply the uncertainties 0.2 cm and 0.1 cm? EXAMPLE 1.9 Installing a Carpet Note that in reducing 43.976 6 to three significant figures for our answer, we used a general rule for rounding off numbers that states that the last digit retained (the 9 in this example) is increased by 1 if the first digit dropped (here, the 7) is 5 or greater. (A technique for avoiding error accumulation is to delay rounding of numbers in a long calculation until you have the final result. Wait until you are ready to copy the answer from your calculator before rounding to the correct number of significant figures.) A carpet is to be installed in a room whose length is measured to be 12.71 m and whose width is measured to be 3.46 m. Find the area of the room. Solution If you multiply 12.71 m by 3.46 m on your calculator, you will get an answer of 43.976 6 m2. How many of these numbers should you claim? Our rule of thumb for multiplication tells us that you can claim only the number of significant figures in the least accurate of the quantities being measured. In this example, we have only three significant figures in our least accurate measurement, so we should express our final answer as 44.0 m2. Problems 17 SUMMARY The three fundamental physical quantities of mechanics are length, mass, and time, which in the SI system have the units meters (m), kilograms (kg), and seconds (s), respectively. Prefixes indicating various powers of ten are used with these three basic units. The density of a substance is defined as its mass per unit volume. Different substances have different densities mainly because of differences in their atomic masses and atomic arrangements. The number of particles in one mole of any element or compound, called Avogadro's number, NA , is 6.02 1023. The method of dimensional analysis is very powerful in solving physics problems. Dimensions can be treated as algebraic quantities. By making estimates and making order-of-magnitude calculations, you should be able to approximate the answer to a problem when there is not enough information available to completely specify an exact solution. When you compute a result from several measured numbers, each of which has a certain accuracy, you should give the result with the correct number of significant figures. QUESTIONS 1. In this chapter we described how the Earth's daily rotation on its axis was once used to define the standard unit of time. What other types of natural phenomena could serve as alternative time standards? 2. Suppose that the three fundamental standards of the metric system were length, density, and time rather than length, mass, and time. The standard of density in this system is to be defined as that of water. What considerations about water would you need to address to make sure that the standard of density is as accurate as possible? 3. A hand is defined as 4 in.; a foot is defined as 12 in. Why should the hand be any less acceptable as a unit than the foot, which we use all the time? 4. Express the following quantities using the prefixes given in 5. Table 1.4: (a) 3 10 4 m (b) 5 10 5 s (c) 72 102 g. Suppose that two quantities A and B have different dimensions. Determine which of the following arithmetic operations could be physically meaningful: (a) A B (b) A/B (c) B A (d) AB. What level of accuracy is implied in an order-of-magnitude calculation? Do an order-of-magnitude calculation for an everyday situation you might encounter. For example, how far do you walk or drive each day? Estimate your age in seconds. Estimate the mass of this textbook in kilograms. If a scale is available, check your estimate. 6. 7. 8. 9. PROBLEMS 1, 2, 3 = straightforward, intermediate, challenging = full solution available in the Student Solutions Manual and Study Guide WEB = solution posted at http://www.saunderscollege.com/physics/ = Computer useful in solving problem = Interactive Physics = paired numerical/symbolic problems Section 1.3 Density 1. The standard kilogram is a platinum iridium cylinder 39.0 mm in height and 39.0 mm in diameter. What is the density of the material? 2. The mass of the planet Saturn (Fig. P1.2) is 5.64 1026 kg, and its radius is 6.00 107 m. Calculate its density. 3. How many grams of copper are required to make a hollow spherical shell having an inner radius of 5.70 cm and an outer radius of 5.75 cm? The density of copper is 8.92 g/cm3. 4. What mass of a material with density is required to make a hollow spherical shell having inner radius r1 and outer radius r 2 ? 5. Iron has molar mass 55.8 g/mol. (a) Find the volume of 1 mol of iron. (b) Use the value found in (a) to determine the volume of one iron atom. (c) Calculate the cube root of the atomic volume, to have an estimate for the distance between atoms in the solid. (d) Repeat the calculations for uranium, finding its molar mass in the periodic table of the elements in Appendix C. 18 CHAPTER 1 Physics and Measurements (a) What is the mass of a section 1.50 m long? (b) How many atoms are there in this section? The density of steel is 7.56 103 kg/m3. 11. A child at the beach digs a hole in the sand and, using a pail, fills it with water having a mass of 1.20 kg. The molar mass of water is 18.0 g/mol. (a) Find the number of water molecules in this pail of water. (b) Suppose the quantity of water on the Earth is 1.32 1021 kg and remains constant. How many of the water molecules in this pail of water were likely to have been in an equal quantity of water that once filled a particular claw print left by a dinosaur? Section 1.4 Dimensional Analysis 12. The radius r of a circle inscribed in any triangle whose sides are a, b, and c is given by r [(s a)(s b)(s c)/s]1/2 where s is an abbreviation for (a b c)/2. Check this formula for dimensional consistency. 13. The displacement of a particle moving under uniform acceleration is some function of the elapsed time and the acceleration. Suppose we write this displacement s ka mt n, where k is a dimensionless constant. Show by dimensional analysis that this expression is satisfied if m 1 and n 2. Can this analysis give the value of k? 14. The period T of a simple pendulum is measured in time units and is described by T 2 Figure P1.2 A view of Saturn from Voyager 2. (Courtesy of NASA) 6. Two spheres are cut from a certain uniform rock. One has radius 4.50 cm. The mass of the other is five times greater. Find its radius. WEB 7. Calculate the mass of an atom of (a) helium, (b) iron, and (c) lead. Give your answers in atomic mass units and in grams. The molar masses are 4.00, 55.9, and 207 g/mol, respectively, for the atoms given. 8. On your wedding day your lover gives you a gold ring of mass 3.80 g. Fifty years later its mass is 3.35 g. As an average, how many atoms were abraded from the ring during each second of your marriage? The molar mass of gold is 197 g/mol. 9. A small cube of iron is observed under a microscope. The edge of the cube is 5.00 10 6 cm long. Find (a) the mass of the cube and (b) the number of iron atoms in the cube. The molar mass of iron is 55.9 g/mol, and its density is 7.86 g/cm3. 10. A structural I-beam is made of steel. A view of its crosssection and its dimensions are shown in Figure P1.10. 15.0 cm WEB g where is the length of the pendulum and g is the freefall acceleration in units of length divided by the square of time. Show that this equation is dimensionally correct. 15. Which of the equations below are dimensionally correct? (a) v v 0 ax (b) y (2 m) cos(kx), where k 2 m 1 16. Newton's law of universal gravitation is represented by F GMm r2 1.00 cm 36.0 cm Here F is the gravitational force, M and m are masses, and r is a length. Force has the SI units kg m/s2. What are the SI units of the proportionality constant G ? 17. The consumption of natural gas by a company satisfies the empirical equation V 1.50t 0.008 00t 2, where V is the volume in millions of cubic feet and t the time in months. Express this equation in units of cubic feet and seconds. Put the proper units on the coefficients. Assume a month is 30.0 days. 1.00 cm Section 1.5 Conversion of Units Figure P1.10 18. Suppose your hair grows at the rate 1/32 in. per day. Find the rate at which it grows in nanometers per second. Since the distance between atoms in a molecule is Problems on the order of 0.1 nm, your answer suggests how rapidly layers of atoms are assembled in this protein synthesis. A rectangular building lot is 100 ft by 150 ft. Determine the area of this lot in m2. An auditorium measures 40.0 m 20.0 m 12.0 m. The density of air is 1.20 kg/m3. What are (a) the volume of the room in cubic feet and (b) the weight of air in the room in pounds? Assume that it takes 7.00 min to fill a 30.0-gal gasoline tank. (a) Calculate the rate at which the tank is filled in gallons per second. (b) Calculate the rate at which the tank is filled in cubic meters per second. (c) Determine the time, in hours, required to fill a 1-cubic-meter volume at the same rate. (1 U.S. gal 231 in.3 ) A creature moves at a speed of 5.00 furlongs per fortnight (not a very common unit of speed). Given that 1 furlong 220 yards and 1 fortnight 14 days, determine the speed of the creature in meters per second. What kind of creature do you think it might be? A section of land has an area of 1 mi2 and contains 640 acres. Determine the number of square meters in 1 acre. A quart container of ice cream is to be made in the form of a cube. What should be the length of each edge in centimeters? (Use the conversion 1 gal 3.786 L.) A solid piece of lead has a mass of 23.94 g and a volume of 2.10 cm3. From these data, calculate the density of lead in SI units (kg/m3 ). An astronomical unit (AU) is defined as the average distance between the Earth and the Sun. (a) How many astronomical units are there in one lightyear? (b) Determine the distance from the Earth to the Andromeda galaxy in astronomical units. The mass of the Sun is 1.99 1030 kg, and the mass of an atom of hydrogen, of which the Sun is mostly composed, is 1.67 10 27 kg. How many atoms are there in the Sun? (a) Find a conversion factor to convert from miles per hour to kilometers per hour. (b) In the past, a federal law mandated that highway speed limits would be 55 mi/h. Use the conversion factor of part (a) to find this speed in kilometers per hour. (c) The maximum highway speed is now 65 mi/h in some places. In kilometers per hour, how much of an increase is this over the 55-mi/h limit? At the time of this book's printing, the U. S. national debt is about $6 trillion. (a) If payments were made at the rate of $1 000/s, how many years would it take to pay off a $6-trillion debt, assuming no interest were charged? (b) A dollar bill is about 15.5 cm long. If six trillion dollar bills were laid end to end around the Earth's equator, how many times would they encircle the Earth? Take the radius of the Earth at the equator to be 6 378 km. (Note: Before doing any of these calculations, try to guess at the answers. You may be very surprised.) 19 19. 20. WEB 21. 30. (a) How many seconds are there in a year? (b) If one micrometeorite (a sphere with a diameter of 1.00 10 6 m) strikes each square meter of the Moon each second, how many years will it take to cover the Moon to a depth of 1.00 m? (Hint: Consider a cubic box on the Moon 1.00 m on a side, and find how long it will take to fill the box.) 31. One gallon of paint (volume 3.78 10 3 m3 ) covers an area of 25.0 m2. What is the thickness of the paint on the wall? 32. A pyramid has a height of 481 ft, and its base covers an area of 13.0 acres (Fig. P1.32). If the volume of a pyramid is given by the expression V 1Bh, where B is the 3 area of the base and h is the height, find the volume of this pyramid in cubic meters. (1 acre 43 560 ft2 ) 22. 23. 24. 25. Figure P1.32 Problems 32 and 33. 26. 27. 28. 29. 33. The pyramid described in Problem 32 contains approximately two million stone blocks that average 2.50 tons each. Find the weight of this pyramid in pounds. 34. Assuming that 70% of the Earth's surface is covered with water at an average depth of 2.3 mi, estimate the mass of the water on the Earth in kilograms. 35. The amount of water in reservoirs is often measured in acre-feet. One acre-foot is a volume that covers an area of 1 acre to a depth of 1 ft. An acre is an area of 43 560 ft2. Find the volume in SI units of a reservoir containing 25.0 acre-ft of water. 36. A hydrogen atom has a diameter of approximately 1.06 10 10 m, as defined by the diameter of the spherical electron cloud around the nucleus. The hydrogen nucleus has a diameter of approximately 2.40 10 15 m. (a) For a scale model, represent the diameter of the hydrogen atom by the length of an American football field (100 yards 300 ft), and determine the diameter of the nucleus in millimeters. (b) The atom is how many times larger in volume than its nucleus? 37. The diameter of our disk-shaped galaxy, the Milky Way, is about 1.0 105 lightyears. The distance to Messier 31 -- which is Andromeda, the spiral galaxy nearest to the Milky Way -- is about 2.0 million lightyears. If a scale model represents the Milky Way and Andromeda galax- 20 CHAPTER 1 Physics and Measurements ifying examinations and for his own facility in making order-of-magnitude calculations. ies as dinner plates 25 cm in diameter, determine the distance between the two plates. 38. The mean radius of the Earth is 6.37 106 m, and that of the Moon is 1.74 108 cm. From these data calculate (a) the ratio of the Earth's surface area to that of the Moon and (b) the ratio of the Earth's volume to that of the Moon. Recall that the surface area of a sphere is 4 r 2 and that the volume of a sphere is 4 r 3. 3 WEB Section 1.7 Significant Figures 39. One cubic meter (1.00 m3 ) of aluminum has a mass of 2.70 103 kg, and 1.00 m3 of iron has a mass of 7.86 103 kg. Find the radius of a solid aluminum sphere that balances a solid iron sphere of radius 2.00 cm on an equal-arm balance. 40. Let A1 represent the density of aluminum and Fe that of iron. Find the radius of a solid aluminum sphere that balances a solid iron sphere of radius r Fe on an equalarm balance. Section 1.6 WEB Estimates and Order-ofMagnitude Calculations 41. Estimate the number of Ping-Pong balls that would fit into an average-size room (without being crushed). In your solution state the quantities you measure or estimate and the values you take for them. 42. McDonald's sells about 250 million packages of French fries per year. If these fries were placed end to end, estimate how far they would reach. 43. An automobile tire is rated to last for 50 000 miles. Estimate the number of revolutions the tire will make in its lifetime. 44. Approximately how many raindrops fall on a 1.0-acre lot during a 1.0-in. rainfall? 45. Grass grows densely everywhere on a quarter-acre plot of land. What is the order of magnitude of the number of blades of grass on this plot of land? Explain your reasoning. (1 acre 43 560 ft2.) 46. Suppose that someone offers to give you $1 billion if you can finish counting it out using only one-dollar bills. Should you accept this offer? Assume you can count one bill every second, and be sure to note that you need about 8 hours a day for sleeping and eating and that right now you are probably at least 18 years old. 47. Compute the order of magnitude of the mass of a bathtub half full of water and of the mass of a bathtub half full of pennies. In your solution, list the quantities you take as data and the value you measure or estimate for each. 48. Soft drinks are commonly sold in aluminum containers. Estimate the number of such containers thrown away or recycled each year by U.S. consumers. Approximately how many tons of aluminum does this represent? 49. To an order of magnitude, how many piano tuners are there in New York City? The physicist Enrico Fermi was famous for asking questions like this on oral Ph.D. qual- 50. Determine the number of significant figures in the following measured values: (a) 23 cm (b) 3.589 s (c) 4.67 103 m/s (d) 0.003 2 m. 51. The radius of a circle is measured to be 10.5 0.2 m. Calculate the (a) area and (b) circumference of the circle and give the uncertainty in each value. 52. Carry out the following arithmetic operations: (a) the sum of the measured values 756, 37.2, 0.83, and 2.5; (b) the product 0.003 2 356.3; (c) the product 5.620 . 53. The radius of a solid sphere is measured to be (6.50 0.20) cm, and its mass is measured to be (1.85 0.02) kg. Determine the density of the sphere in kilograms per cubic meter and the uncertainty in the density. 54. How many significant figures are in the following numbers: (a) 78.9 0.2, (b) 3.788 109, (c) 2.46 10 6, and (d) 0.005 3? 55. A farmer measures the distance around a rectangular field. The length of the long sides of the rectangle is found to be 38.44 m, and the length of the short sides is found to be 19.5 m. What is the total distance around the field? 56. A sidewalk is to be constructed around a swimming pool that measures (10.0 0.1) m by (17.0 0.1) m. If the sidewalk is to measure (1.00 0.01) m wide by (9.0 0.1) cm thick, what volume of concrete is needed, and what is the approximate uncertainty of this volume? ADDITIONAL PROBLEMS 57. In a situation where data are known to three significant digits, we write 6.379 m 6.38 m and 6.374 m 6.37 m. When a number ends in 5, we arbitrarily choose to write 6.375 m 6.38 m. We could equally well write 6.375 m 6.37 m, "rounding down" instead of "rounding up," since we would change the number 6.375 by equal increments in both cases. Now consider an orderof-magnitude estimate, in which we consider factors rather than increments. We write 500 m 103 m because 500 differs from 100 by a factor of 5 whereas it differs from 1000 by only a factor of 2. We write 437 m 103 m and 305 m 102 m. What distance differs from 100 m and from 1000 m by equal factors, so that we could equally well choose to represent its order of magnitude either as 102 m or as 103 m? 58. When a droplet of oil spreads out on a smooth water surface, the resulting "oil slick" is approximately one molecule thick. An oil droplet of mass 9.00 10 7 kg and density 918 kg/m3 spreads out into a circle of radius 41.8 cm on the water surface. What is the diameter of an oil molecule? Problems 59. The basic function of the carburetor of an automobile is to "atomize" the gasoline and mix it with air to promote rapid combustion. As an example, assume that 30.0 cm3 of gasoline is atomized into N spherical droplets, each with a radius of 2.00 10 5 m. What is the total surface area of these N spherical droplets? 60. In physics it is important to use mathematical approximations. Demonstrate for yourself that for small angles ( 20) tan sin /180 21 64. A crystalline solid consists of atoms stacked up in a repeating lattice structure. Consider a crystal as shown in Figure P1.64a. The atoms reside at the corners of cubes of side L 0.200 nm. One piece of evidence for the regular arrangement of atoms comes from the flat surfaces along which a crystal separates, or "cleaves," when it is broken. Suppose this crystal cleaves along a face diagonal, as shown in Figure P1.64b. Calculate the spacing d between two adjacent atomic planes that separate when the crystal cleaves. is in degrees. Use a calculawhere is in radians and tor to find the largest angle for which tan may be approximated by sin if the error is to be less than 10.0%. 61. A high fountain of water is located at the center of a circular pool as in Figure P1.61. Not wishing to get his feet wet, a student walks around the pool and measures its circumference to be 15.0 m. Next, the student stands at the edge of the pool and uses a protractor to gauge the angle of elevation of the top of the fountain to be 55.0. How high is the fountain? L d (a) (b) Figure P1.64 55.0 Figure P1.61 62. Assume that an object covers an area A and has a uniform height h. If its cross-sectional area is uniform over its height, then its volume is given by V Ah. (a) Show that V Ah is dimensionally correct. (b) Show that the volumes of a cylinder and of a rectangular box can be written in the form V Ah, identifying A in each case. (Note that A, sometimes called the "footprint" of the object, can have any shape and that the height can be replaced by average thickness in general.) 63. A useful fact is that there are about 107 s in one year. Find the percentage error in this approximation, where "percentage error" is defined as Assumed value true value True value 100% 65. A child loves to watch as you fill a transparent plastic bottle with shampoo. Every horizontal cross-section of the bottle is a circle, but the diameters of the circles all have different values, so that the bottle is much wider in some places than in others. You pour in bright green shampoo with constant volume flow rate 16.5 cm3/s. At what rate is its level in the bottle rising (a) at a point where the diameter of the bottle is 6.30 cm and (b) at a point where the diameter is 1.35 cm? 66. As a child, the educator and national leader Booker T. Washington was given a spoonful (about 12.0 cm3) of molasses as a treat. He pretended that the quantity increased when he spread it out to cover uniformly all of a tin plate (with a diameter of about 23.0 cm). How thick a layer did it make? 67. Assume there are 100 million passenger cars in the United States and that the average fuel consumption is 20 mi/gal of gasoline. If the average distance traveled by each car is 10 000 mi/yr, how much gasoline would be saved per year if average fuel consumption could be increased to 25 mi/gal? 68. One cubic centimeter of water has a mass of 1.00 10 3 kg. (a) Determine the mass of 1.00 m3 of water. (b) Assuming biological substances are 98% water, esti- 22 CHAPTER 1 Physics and Measurements minum, copper, brass, tin, and iron. Use these data to calculate the densities of these substances. Compare your results for aluminum, copper, and iron with those given in Table 1.5. Substance Mass (g) Diameter (cm) Length (cm) mate the mass of a cell that has a diameter of 1.0 m, a human kidney, and a fly. Assume that a kidney is roughly a sphere with a radius of 4.0 cm and that a fly is roughly a cylinder 4.0 mm long and 2.0 mm in diameter. 69. The distance from the Sun to the nearest star is 4 1016 m. The Milky Way galaxy is roughly a disk of diameter 1021 m and thickness 1019 m. Find the order of magnitude of the number of stars in the Milky Way. Assume the 4 10 16-m distance between the Sun and the nearest star is typical. 70. The data in the following table represent measurements of the masses and dimensions of solid cylinders of alu- Aluminum Copper Brass Tin Iron 51.5 56.3 94.4 69.1 216.1 2.52 1.23 1.54 1.75 1.89 3.75 5.06 5.69 3.74 9.77 ANSWERS TO QUICK QUIZZES 1.1 False. Dimensional analysis gives the units of the proportionality constant but provides no information about its numerical value. For example, experiments show that doubling the radius of a solid sphere increases its mass 8-fold, and tripling the radius increases the mass 27-fold. Therefore, its mass is proportional to the cube of its radius. Because m r 3we can write m kr 3. Dimen, sional analysis shows that the proportionality constant k must have units kg/m3, but to determine its numerical value requires either experimental data or geometrical reasoning. 1.2 Reporting all these digits implies you have determined the location of the center of the chair's seat to the nearest 0.000 000 000 1 m. This roughly corresponds to being able to count the atoms in your meter stick because each of them is about that size! It would probably be better to record the measurement as 1.044 m: this indicates that you know the position to the nearest millimeter, assuming the meter stick has millimeter markings on its scale. P U Z Z L E R In a moment the arresting cable will be pulled taut, and the 140-mi/h landing of this F/A-18 Hornet on the aircraft carrier USS Nimitz will be brought to a sudden conclusion. The pilot cuts power to the engine, and the plane is stopped in less than 2 s. If the cable had not been successfully engaged, the pilot would have had to take off quickly before reaching the end of the flight deck. Can the motion of the plane be described quantitatively in a way that is useful to ship and aircraft designers and to pilots learning to land on a "postage stamp?" (Courtesy of the USS Nimitz/U.S. Navy) c h a p t e r Motion in One Dimension Chapter Outline 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 Displacement, Velocity, and Speed Instantaneous Velocity and Speed Acceleration Motion Diagrams One-Dimensional Motion with Constant Acceleration 2.6 Freely Falling Objects 2.7 (Optional) Kinematic Equations Derived from Calculus GOAL Problem-Solving Steps 23 24 CHAPTER 2 Motion in One Dimension s a first step in studying classical mechanics, we describe motion in terms of space and time while ignoring the agents that caused that motion. This portion of classical mechanics is called kinematics. (The word kinematics has the same root as cinema. Can you see why?) In this chapter we consider only motion in one dimension. We first define displacement, velocity, and acceleration. Then, using these concepts, we study the motion of objects traveling in one dimension with a constant acceleration. From everyday experience we recognize that motion represents a continuous change in the position of an object. In physics we are concerned with three types of motion: translational, rotational, and vibrational. A car moving down a highway is an example of translational motion, the Earth's spin on its axis is an example of rotational motion, and the back-and-forth movement of a pendulum is an example of vibrational motion. In this and the next few chapters, we are concerned only with translational motion. (Later in the book we shall discuss rotational and vibrational motions.) In our study of translational motion, we describe the moving object as a particle regardless of its size. In general, a particle is a point-like mass having infinitesimal size. For example, if we wish to describe the motion of the Earth around the Sun, we can treat the Earth as a particle and obtain reasonably accurate data about its orbit. This approximation is justified because the radius of the Earth's orbit is large compared with the dimensions of the Earth and the Sun. As an example on a much smaller scale, it is possible to explain the pressure exerted by a gas on the walls of a container by treating the gas molecules as particles. A 2.1 TABLE 2.1 Position of the Car at Various Times Position t(s) 0 10 20 30 40 50 x(m) 30 52 38 0 37 53 DISPLACEMENT, VELOCITY, AND SPEED The motion of a particle is completely known if the particle's position in space is known at all times. Consider a car moving back and forth along the x axis, as shown in Figure 2.1a. When we begin collecting position data, the car is 30 m to the right of a road sign. (Let us assume that all data in this example are known to two significant figures. To convey this information, we should report the initial position as 3.0 101 m. We have written this value in this simpler form to make the discussion easier to follow.) We start our clock and once every 10 s note the car's location relative to the sign. As you can see from Table 2.1, the car is moving to the right (which we have defined as the positive direction) during the first 10 s of motion, from position to position . The position values now begin to decrease, however, because the car is backing up from position through position . In fact, at , 30 s after we start measuring, the car is alongside the sign we are using as our origin of coordinates. It continues moving to the left and is more than 50 m to the left of the sign when we stop recording information after our sixth data point. A graph of this information is presented in Figure 2.1b. Such a plot is called a position time graph. If a particle is moving, we can easily determine its change in position. The displacement of a particle is defined as its change in position. As it moves from an initial position x i to a final position xf , its displacement is given by x f x i . We use the Greek letter delta ( ) to denote the change in a quantity. Therefore, we write the displacement, or change in position, of the particle as x xf xi (2.1) From this definition we see that x is positive if xf is greater than x i and negative if xf is less than x i . 2.1 Displacement, Velocity, and Speed 25 60 IT LIM /h 30 km 50 40 30 20 10 0 10 20 Figure 2.1 (a) A car moves back and forth along a straight line taken to be the x axis. Because we are interested only in the car's translational motion, we can treat it as a particle. (b) Position time graph for the motion of the "particle." 30 40 50 60 x(m) 60 IT LIM /h 30 km 50 40 30 20 10 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 x(m) (a) x(m) 60 40 20 0 20 40 60 t(s) 0 10 20 30 (b) 40 50 t x A very easy mistake to make is not to recognize the difference between displacement and distance traveled (Fig. 2.2). A baseball player hitting a home run travels a distance of 360 ft in the trip around the bases. However, the player's displacement is zero because his final and initial positions are identical. Displacement is an example of a vector quantity. Many other physical quantities, including velocity and acceleration, also are vectors. In general, a vector is a physical quantity that requires the specification of both direction and magnitude. By contrast, a scalar is a quantity that has magnitude and no direction. In this chapter, we use plus and minus signs to indicate vector direction. We can do this because the chapter deals with one-dimensional motion only; this means that any object we study can be moving only along a straight line. For example, for horizontal motion, let us arbitrarily specify to the right as being the positive direction. It follows that any object always moving to the right undergoes a 26 CHAPTER 2 Motion in One Dimension Figure 2.2 Bird's-eye view of a baseball diamond. A batter who hits a home run travels 360 ft as he rounds the bases, but his displacement for the round trip is zero. (Mark C. Burnett/Photo Researchers, Inc.) positive displacement x, and any object moving to the left undergoes a negative displacement x. We shall treat vectors in greater detail in Chapter 3. There is one very important point that has not yet been mentioned. Note that the graph in Figure 2.1b does not consist of just six data points but is actually a smooth curve. The graph contains information about the entire 50-s interval during which we watched the car move. It is much easier to see changes in position from the graph than from a verbal description or even a table of numbers. For example, it is clear that the car was covering more ground during the middle of the 50-s interval than at the end. Between positions and , the car traveled almost 40 m, but during the last 10 s, between positions and , it moved less than half that far. A common way of comparing these different motions is to divide the displacement x that occurs between two clock readings by the length of that particular time interval t. This turns out to be a very useful ratio, one that we shall use many times. For convenience, the ratio has been given a special name -- average velocity. The average velocity vx of a particle is defined as the particle's displacement x divided by the time interval t during which that displacement occurred: Average velocity vx x t (2.2) 3.2 where the subscript x indicates motion along the x axis. From this definition we see that average velocity has dimensions of length divided by time (L/T) -- meters per second in SI units. Although the distance traveled for any motion is always positive, the average velocity of a particle moving in one dimension can be positive or negative, depending on the sign of the displacement. (The time interval t is always positive.) If the coordinate of the particle increases in time (that is, if x f x i), then x is positive and vx x/ t is positive. This case corresponds to motion in the positive x direction. If the coordinate decreases in time (that is, if x f x i), then x is negative and hence v x is negative. This case corresponds to motion in the negative x direction. 2.2 Instantaneous Velocity and Speed 27 We can interpret average velocity geometrically by drawing a straight line between any two points on the position time graph in Figure 2.1b. This line forms the hypotenuse of a right triangle of height x and base t. The slope of this line is the ratio x/ t. For example, the line between positions and has a slope equal to the average velocity of the car between those two times, (52 m 30 m)/ (10 s 0) 2.2 m/s. In everyday usage, the terms speed and velocity are interchangeable. In physics, however, there is a clear distinction between these two quantities. Consider a marathon runner who runs more than 40 km, yet ends up at his starting point. His average velocity is zero! Nonetheless, we need to be able to quantify how fast he was running. A slightly different ratio accomplishes this for us. The average speed of a particle, a scalar quantity, is defined as the total distance traveled divided by the total time it takes to travel that distance: Average speed total distance total time Average speed The SI unit of average speed is the same as the unit of average velocity: meters per second. However, unlike average velocity, average speed has no direction and hence carries no algebraic sign. Knowledge of the average speed of a particle tells us nothing about the details of the trip. For example, suppose it takes you 8.0 h to travel 280 km in your car. The average speed for your trip is 35 km/h. However, you most likely traveled at various speeds during the trip, and the average speed of 35 km/h could result from an infinite number of possible speed values. EXAMPLE 2.1 Calculating the Variables of Motion magnitude as the supplied data. A quick look at Figure 2.1a indicates that this is the correct answer. It is difficult to estimate the average velocity without completing the calculation, but we expect the units to be meters per second. Because the car ends up to the left of where we started taking data, we know the average velocity must be negative. From Equation 2.2, vx x t 53 m 50 s xf tf xi ti 30 m 0s xF tF xA tA 83 m 50 s 1.7 m/s Find the displacement, average velocity, and average speed of the car in Figure 2.1a between positions and . Solution The units of displacement must be meters, and the numerical result should be of the same order of magnitude as the given position data (which means probably not 10 or 100 times bigger or smaller). From the position time graph given in Figure 2.1b, note that x A 30 m at t A 0 s and that x F 53 m at t F 50 s. Using these values along with the definition of displacement, Equation 2.1, we find that x xF xA 53 m 30 m 83 m We find the car's average speed for this trip by adding the distances traveled and dividing by the total time: Average speed 22 m 52 m 50 s 53 m 2.5 m/s This result means that the car ends up 83 m in the negative direction (to the left, in this case) from where it started. This number has the correct units and is of the same order of 2.2 INSTANTANEOUS VELOCITY AND SPEED Often we need to know the velocity of a particle at a particular instant in time, rather than over a finite time interval. For example, even though you might want to calculate your average velocity during a long automobile trip, you would be especially interested in knowing your velocity at the instant you noticed the police 28 x(m) CHAPTER 2 Motion in One Dimension 60 40 60 20 0 20 40 60 t(s) 40 0 10 20 30 (a) 40 50 (b) Figure 2.3 (a) Graph representing the motion of the car in Figure 2.1. (b) An enlargement of the upper left -hand corner of the graph shows how the blue line between positions and approaches the green tangent line as point gets closer to point . car parked alongside the road in front of you. In other words, you would like to be able to specify your velocity just as precisely as you can specify your position by noting what is happening at a specific clock reading -- that is, at some specific instant. It may not be immediately obvious how to do this. What does it mean to talk about how fast something is moving if we "freeze time" and talk only about an individual instant? This is a subtle point not thoroughly understood until the late 1600s. At that time, with the invention of calculus, scientists began to understand how to describe an object's motion at any moment in time. To see how this is done, consider Figure 2.3a. We have already discussed the average velocity for the interval during which the car moved from position to position (given by the slope of the dark blue line) and for the interval during which it moved from to (represented by the slope of the light blue line). Which of these two lines do you think is a closer approximation of the initial velocity of the car? The car starts out by moving to the right, which we defined to be the positive direction. Therefore, being positive, the value of the average velocity during the to interval is probably closer to the initial value than is the value of the average velocity during the to interval, which we determined to be negative in Example 2.1. Now imagine that we start with the dark blue line and slide point to the left along the curve, toward point , as in Figure 2.3b. The line between the points becomes steeper and steeper, and as the two points get extremely close together, the line becomes a tangent line to the curve, indicated by the green line on the graph. The slope of this tangent line represents the velocity of the car at the moment we started taking data, at point . What we have done is determine the instantaneous velocity at that moment. In other words, the instantaneous velocity vx equals the limiting value of the ratio x/ t as t approaches zero:1 3.3 Definition of instantaneous velocity vx 1 lim t:0 x t (2.3) Note that the displacement x also approaches zero as t approaches zero. As x and t become smaller and smaller, the ratio x/ t approaches a value equal to the slope of the line tangent to the x-versus-t curve. 2.2 Instantaneous Velocity and Speed 29 In calculus notation, this limit is called the derivative of x with respect to t, written dx/dt: vx lim t:0 x t dx dt (2.4) The instantaneous velocity can be positive, negative, or zero. When the slope of the position time graph is positive, such as at any time during the first 10 s in Figure 2.3, vx is positive. After point , vx is negative because the slope is negative. At the peak, the slope and the instantaneous velocity are zero. From here on, we use the word velocity to designate instantaneous velocity. When it is average velocity we are interested in, we always use the adjective average. The instantaneous speed of a particle is defined as the magnitude of its velocity. As with average speed, instantaneous speed has no direction associated with it and hence carries no algebraic sign. For example, if one particle has a velocity of 25 m/s along a given line and another particle has a velocity of 25 m/s along the same line, both have a speed2 of 25 m/s. EXAMPLE 2.2 Average and Instantaneous Velocity x(m) 10 8 6 4 Slope = 2 m/s 2 0 2 4 0 1 2 3 4 t(s) Slope = 4 m/s A particle moves along the x axis. Its x coordinate varies with time according to the expression x 4t 2t 2, where x is in 3 The position time graph for this meters and t is in seconds. motion is shown in Figure 2.4. Note that the particle moves in the negative x direction for the first second of motion, is at rest at the moment t 1 s, and moves in the positive x direction for t 1 s. (a) Determine the displacement of the particle in the time intervals t 0 to t 1 s and t 1 s to t 3 s. During the first time interval, we have a negative slope and hence a negative velocity. Thus, we know that the displacement between and must be a negative number having units of meters. Similarly, we expect the displacement between and to be positive. In the first time interval, we set t i t A 0 and t f t B 1 s. Using Equation 2.1, with x 4t 2t 2, we obtain for the first displacement x A:B xf xi xB xA [ 4(0) 2(0)2] [ 4(1) 2m To calculate the displacement during the second time interval, we set t i t B 1 s and t f t D 3 s: x B:D 2 3 Solution Figure 2.4 Position time graph for a particle having an x coordinate that varies in time according to the expression x 4t 2t 2. 2(1)2] [ 4(3) 8m 2(3)2] [ 4(1) 2(1)2] xf xi xD xB These displacements can also be read directly from the position time graph. As with velocity, we drop the adjective for instantaneous speed: "Speed" means instantaneous speed. Simply to make it easier to read, we write the empirical equation as x 4t 2t 2 rather than as x ( 4.00 m/s)t (2.00 m/s2)t 2.00. When an equation summarizes measurements, consider its coefficients to have as many significant digits as other data quoted in a problem. Consider its coefficients to have the units required for dimensional consistency. When we start our clocks at t 0 s, we usually do not mean to limit the precision to a single digit. Consider any zero value in this book to have as many significant figures as you need. 30 CHAPTER 2 Motion in One Dimension These values agree with the slopes of the lines joining these points in Figure 2.4. (c) Find the instantaneous velocity of the particle at t 2.5 s. (b) Calculate the average velocity during these two time intervals. In the first time interval, t t f t i t B t A 1 s. Therefore, using Equation 2.2 and the displacement calculated in (a), we find that v x(A:B) x A:B t 2m 1s 2 m/s Solution In the second time interval, t v x(B:D) x B:D t 8m 2s 2 s; therefore, 4 m/s Solution Certainly we can guess that this instantaneous velocity must be of the same order of magnitude as our previous results, that is, around 4 m/s. Examining the graph, we see that the slope of the tangent at position is greater than the slope of the blue line connecting points and . Thus, we expect the answer to be greater than 4 m/s. By measuring the slope of the position time graph at t 2.5 s, we find that vx 6 m/s 2.3 ACCELERATION In the last example, we worked with a situation in which the velocity of a particle changed while the particle was moving. This is an extremely common occurrence. (How constant is your velocity as you ride a city bus?) It is easy to quantify changes in velocity as a function of time in exactly the same way we quantify changes in position as a function of time. When the velocity of a particle changes with time, the particle is said to be accelerating. For example, the velocity of a car increases when you step on the gas and decreases when you apply the brakes. However, we need a better definition of acceleration than this. Suppose a particle moving along the x axis has a velocity vxi at time ti and a velocity vxf at time tf , as in Figure 2.5a. The average acceleration of the particle is defined as the change in velocity vx divided by the time interval t during which that change occurred: vx f tf v xi ti Average acceleration ax vx t (2.5) As with velocity, when the motion being analyzed is one-dimensional, we can use positive and negative signs to indicate the direction of the acceleration. Because the dimensions of velocity are L/T and the dimension of time is T, accelera- vx = vx ax t vx (a) A "particle" moving along the x axis from to has velocity vxi at t ti and velocity vx f at t tf . (b) Velocity time graph for the particle moving in a straight line. The slope of the blue straight line connecting and is the average acceleration in the time interval t t f t i . Figure 2.5 vxf vxi x ti v = vxi (a) tf v = vxf ti (b) t tf t 2.3 Acceleration 31 tion has dimensions of length divided by time squared, or L/T 2. The SI unit of acceleration is meters per second squared (m/s 2). It might be easier to interpret these units if you think of them as meters per second per second. For example, suppose an object has an acceleration of 2 m/s2. You should form a mental image of the object having a velocity that is along a straight line and is increasing by 2 m/s during every 1-s interval. If the object starts from rest, you should be able to picture it moving at a velocity of 2 m/s after 1 s, at 4 m/s after 2 s, and so on. In some situations, the value of the average acceleration may be different over different time intervals. It is therefore useful to define the instantaneous acceleration as the limit of the average acceleration as t approaches zero. This concept is analogous to the definition of instantaneous velocity discussed in the previous section. If we imagine that point is brought closer and closer to point in Figure 2.5a and take the limit of vx / t as t approaches zero, we obtain the instantaneous acceleration: ax lim vx t dv x dt (2.6) Instantaneous acceleration t:0 That is, the instantaneous acceleration equals the derivative of the velocity with respect to time, which by definition is the slope of the velocity time graph (Fig. 2.5b). Thus, we see that just as the velocity of a moving particle is the slope of the particle's x-t graph, the acceleration of a particle is the slope of the particle's vx -t graph. One can interpret the derivative of the velocity with respect to time as the time rate of change of velocity. If ax is positive, then the acceleration is in the positive x direction; if ax is negative, then the acceleration is in the negative x direction. From now on we shall use the term acceleration to mean instantaneous acceleration. When we mean average acceleration, we shall always use the adjective average. Because vx dx/dt, the acceleration can also be written ax dvx dt d dt dx dt d 2x dt 2 (2.7) That is, in one-dimensional motion, the acceleration equals the second derivative of x with respect to time. Figure 2.6 illustrates how an acceleration time graph is related to a velocity time graph. The acceleration at any time is the slope of the velocity time graph at that time. Positive values of acceleration correspond to those points in Figure 2.6a where the velocity is increasing in the positive x direction. The acceler- vx ax tA tB (a) tC t tC tA tB (b) t Figure 2.6 Instantaneous acceleration can be obtained from the vx -t graph. (a) The velocity time graph for some motion. (b) The acceleration time graph for the same motion. The acceleration given by the ax -t graph for any value of t equals the slope of the line tangent to the vx -t graph at the same value of t. 32 CHAPTER 2 Motion in One Dimension ation reaches a maximum at time t A , when the slope of the velocity time graph is a maximum. The acceleration then goes to zero at time t B , when the velocity is a maximum (that is, when the slope of the vx -t graph is zero). The acceleration is negative when the velocity is decreasing in the positive x direction, and it reaches its most negative value at time t C . CONCEPTUAL EXAMPLE 2.3 Graphical Relationships Between x, vx , and ax The position of an object moving along the x axis varies with time as in Figure 2.7a. Graph the velocity versus time and the acceleration versus time for the object. x Solution The velocity at any instant is the slope of the tangent to the x -t graph at that instant. Between t 0 and t t A , the slope of the x-t graph increases uniformly, and so the velocity increases linearly, as shown in Figure 2.7b. Between t A and t B , the slope of the x -t graph is constant, and so the velocity remains constant. At t D , the slope of the x-t graph is zero, so the velocity is zero at that instant. Between t D and t E , the slope of the x -t graph and thus the velocity are negative and decrease uniformly in this interval. In the interval t E to t F , the slope of the x -t graph is still negative, and at t F it goes to zero. Finally, after t F , the slope of the x -t graph is zero, meaning that the object is at rest for t t F . The acceleration at any instant is the slope of the tangent to the vx -t graph at that instant. The graph of acceleration versus time for this object is shown in Figure 2.7c. The acceleration is constant and positive between 0 and t A, where the slope of the vx -t graph is positive. It is zero between t A and t B and for t t F because the slope of the vx -t graph is zero at these times. It is negative between t B and t E because the slope of the vx -t graph is negative during this interval. Figure 2.7 (a) Position time graph for an object moving along the x axis. (b) The velocity time graph for the object is obtained by measuring the slope of the position time graph at each instant. (c) The acceleration time graph for the object is obtained by measuring the slope of the velocity time graph at each instant. (a) O vx (b) O tA tB tC tD tE tF t tA tB tC tD tE tF t ax (c) O tA tB tE tF t Quick Quiz 2.1 Make a velocity time graph for the car in Figure 2.1a and use your graph to determine whether the car ever exceeds the speed limit posted on the road sign (30 km/h). EXAMPLE 2.4 Average and Instantaneous Acceleration Figure 2.8 is a vx -t graph that was created from the velocity versus time expression given in the problem statement. Because the slope of the entire vx -t curve is negative, we expect the acceleration to be negative. The velocity of a particle moving along the x axis varies in time according to the expression vx (40 5t 2) m/s, where t is in seconds. (a) Find the average acceleration in the time interval t 0 to t 2.0 s. Solution 2.3 Acceleration v xf tf v xi ti 10 m/s2 vxB tB vxA tA (20 (2.0 40) m/s 0) s 33 vx(m/s) 40 30 20 10 0 10 20 30 t(s) Slope = 20 m/s2 ax The negative sign is consistent with our expectations -- namely, that the average acceleration, which is represented by the slope of the line (not shown) joining the initial and final points on the velocity time graph, is negative. (b) Determine the acceleration at t 2.0 s. (40 Solution vxf The velocity at any time t is vxi t is 5t 2) m/s, and the velocity at any later time t 40 5(t t)2 40 5t 2 10t t 5( t)2 Therefore, the change in velocity over the time interval t is 0 1 2 3 4 vx vxf vxi [ 10t t 5( t)2] m/s The velocity time graph for a particle moving along the x axis according to the expression vx (40 5t 2) m/s. The acceleration at t 2 s is equal to the slope of the blue tangent line at that time. Figure 2.8 Dividing this expression by t and taking the limit of the result as t approaches zero gives the acceleration at any time t: ax lim t:0 vx t 2.0 s, lim ( 10t t:0 5 t) 10t m/s2 Therefore, at t ax We find the velocities at t i t A 0 and tf t B 2.0 s by substituting these values of t into the expression for the velocity: vxA vxB (40 (40 5t A2) m/s 5t B 2) ( 10)(2.0) m/s2 20 m/s2 [40 [40 5(0)2] m/s 5(2.0)2] m/s 40 m/s 20 m/s m/s Therefore, the average acceleration in the specified time interval t t B t A 2.0 s is What we have done by comparing the average acceleration during the interval between and ( 10 m/s2) with the 2) is compare the slope of instantaneous value at ( 20 m/s the line (not shown) joining and with the slope of the tangent at . Note that the acceleration is not constant in this example. Situations involving constant acceleration are treated in Section 2.5. So far we have evaluated the derivatives of a function by starting with the definition of the function and then taking the limit of a specific ratio. Those of you familiar with calculus should recognize that there are specific rules for taking derivatives. These rules, which are listed in Appendix B.6, enable us to evaluate derivatives quickly. For instance, one rule tells us that the derivative of any constant is zero. As another example, suppose x is proportional to some power of t, such as in the expression x At n where A and n are constants. (This is a very common functional form.) The derivative of x with respect to t is dx dt nAt n 1 Applying this rule to Example 2.4, in which vx dv x /dt 10t. 40 5t 2, we find that a x 34 CHAPTER 2 Motion in One Dimension 2.4 MOTION DIAGRAMS The concepts of velocity and acceleration are often confused with each other, but in fact they are quite different quantities. It is instructive to use motion diagrams to describe the velocity and acceleration while an object is in motion. In order not to confuse these two vector quantities, for which both magnitude and direction are important, we use red for velocity vectors and violet for acceleration vectors, as shown in Figure 2.9. The vectors are sketched at several instants during the motion of the object, and the time intervals between adjacent positions are assumed to be equal. This illustration represents three sets of strobe photographs of a car moving from left to right along a straight roadway. The time intervals between flashes are equal in each diagram. In Figure 2.9a, the images of the car are equally spaced, showing us that the car moves the same distance in each time interval. Thus, the car moves with constant positive velocity and has zero acceleration. In Figure 2.9b, the images become farther apart as time progresses. In this case, the velocity vector increases in time because the car's displacement between adjacent positions increases in time. The car is moving with a positive velocity and a positive acceleration. In Figure 2.9c, we can tell that the car slows as it moves to the right because its displacement between adjacent images decreases with time. In this case, the car moves to the right with a constant negative acceleration. The velocity vector decreases in time and eventually reaches zero. From this diagram we see that the acceleration and velocity vectors are not in the same direction. The car is moving with a positive velocity but with a negative acceleration. You should be able to construct motion diagrams for a car that moves initially to the left with a constant positive or negative acceleration. v (a) v (b) a v (c) a Figure 2.9 (a) Motion diagram for a car moving at constant velocity (zero acceleration). (b) Motion diagram for a car whose constant acceleration is in the direction of its velocity. The velocity vector at each instant is indicated by a red arrow, and the constant acceleration by a violet arrow. (c) Motion diagram for a car whose constant acceleration is in the direction opposite the velocity at each instant. 2.5 One-Dimensional Motion with Constant Acceleration 35 Quick Quiz 2.2 (a) If a car is traveling eastward, can its acceleration be westward? (b) If a car is slowing down, can its acceleration be positive? 2.5 ONE-DIMENSIONAL MOTION WITH CONSTANT ACCELERATION If the acceleration of a particle varies in time, its motion can be complex and difficult to analyze. However, a very common and simple type of one-dimensional motion is that in which the acceleration is constant. When this is the case, the average acceleration over any time interval equals the instantaneous acceleration at any instant within the interval, and the velocity changes at the same rate throughout the motion. If we replace a x by ax in Equation 2.5 and take t i 0 and tf to be any later time t, we find that ax or vx f vxi axt (for constant ax ) (2.8) Velocity as a function of time vx f t vxi This powerful expression enables us to determine an object's velocity at any time t if we know the object's initial velocity and its (constant) acceleration. A velocity time graph for this constant-acceleration motion is shown in Figure 2.10a. The graph is a straight line, the (constant) slope of which is the acceleration ax ; this is consistent with the fact that ax dvx /dt is a constant. Note that the slope is positive; this indicates a positive acceleration. If the acceleration were negative, then the slope of the line in Figure 2.10a would be negative. When the acceleration is constant, the graph of acceleration versus time (Fig. 2.10b) is a straight line having a slope of zero. Quick Quiz 2.3 Describe the meaning of each term in Equation 2.8. vx Slope = ax a xt vxi vxi 0 (a) t t vxf ax Slope = 0 x Slope = vxf ax 0 (b) t xi Slope = vxi 0 (c) t t Figure 2.10 An object moving along the x axis with constant acceleration ax . (a) The velocity time graph. (b) The acceleration time graph. (c) The position time graph. 36 CHAPTER 2 Motion in One Dimension Because velocity at constant acceleration varies linearly in time according to Equation 2.8, we can express the average velocity in any time interval as the arithmetic mean of the initial velocity vxi and the final velocity vx f : vx v xi 2 vx f (for constant ax ) (2.9) Note that this expression for average velocity applies only in situations in which the acceleration is constant. We can now use Equations 2.1, 2.2, and 2.9 to obtain the displacement of any object as a function of time. Recalling that x in Equation 2.2 represents xf xi , and now using t in place of t (because we take ti 0), we can say Displacement as a function of velocity and time xf xi vxt 1 2 (vxi vx f )t (for constant ax ) (2.10) We can obtain another useful expression for displacement at constant acceleration by substituting Equation 2.8 into Equation 2.10: xf xf xi xi 1 2 (v xi v xi 1 2 2a x t a x t)t (2.11) v xit vx ax The position time graph for motion at constant (positive) acceleration shown in Figure 2.10c is obtained from Equation 2.11. Note that the curve is a parabola. The slope of the tangent line to this curve at t t i 0 equals the initial velocity vxi , and the slope of the tangent line at any later time t equals the velocity at that time, vx f . We can check the validity of Equation 2.11 by moving the xi term to the righthand side of the equation and differentiating the equation with respect to time: vx f dx f dt d dt xi v xi t 1 a t2 2 x v xi axt t (a) vx (d) ax t Finally, we can obtain an expression for the final velocity that does not contain a time interval by substituting the value of t from Equation 2.8 into Equation 2.10: xf xi vx f 2 1 (v 2 xi vxi2 vxf) 2ax(x f vx f ax x i) vxi vx f 2 2ax (for constant ax ) (2.12) vxi2 t (b) vx (e) ax t For motion at zero acceleration, we see from Equations 2.8 and 2.11 that vx f xf vxi vx x i vxt when ax 0 That is, when acceleration is zero, velocity is constant and displacement changes linearly with time. t (c) (f ) t Figure 2.11 Parts (a), (b), and (c) are vx -t graphs of objects in one-dimensional motion. The possible accelerations of each object as a function of time are shown in scrambled order in (d), (e), and (f). Quick Quiz 2.4 In Figure 2.11, match each vx -t graph with the a x -t graph that best describes the motion. Equations 2.8 through 2.12 are kinematic expressions that may be used to solve any problem involving one-dimensional motion at constant accelera- 2.5 One-Dimensional Motion with Constant Acceleration 37 TABLE 2.2 Kinematic Equations for Motion in a Straight Line Under Constant Acceleration Equation vxf vxi a x t xf x i 1(vxi vx f )t 2 xf x i vxi t 1a x t 2 2 vx f 2 vxi 2 2a x (xf x i) Note: Motion is along the x axis. Information Given by Equation Velocity as a function of time Displacement as a function of velocity and time Displacement as a function of time Velocity as a function of displacement tion. Keep in mind that these relationships were derived from the definitions of velocity and acceleration, together with some simple algebraic manipulations and the requirement that the acceleration be constant. The four kinematic equations used most often are listed in Table 2.2 for convenience. The choice of which equation you use in a given situation depends on what you know beforehand. Sometimes it is necessary to use two of these equations to solve for two unknowns. For example, suppose initial velocity vxi and acceleration ax are given. You can then find (1) the velocity after an interval t has elapsed, using v x f v xi a x t, and (2) the displacement after an interval t has elapsed, using x f x i v xi t 1a x t 2. You should recognize that the quantities that vary dur2 ing the motion are velocity, displacement, and time. You will get a great deal of practice in the use of these equations by solving a number of exercises and problems. Many times you will discover that more than one method can be used to obtain a solution. Remember that these equations of kinematics cannot be used in a situation in which the acceleration varies with time. They can be used only when the acceleration is constant. CONCEPTUAL EXAMPLE 2.5 The Velocity of Different Objects fined as x/ t.) There is one point at which the instantaneous velocity is zero -- at the top of the motion. (b) The car's average velocity cannot be evaluated unambiguously with the information given, but it must be some value between 0 and 100 m/s. Because the car will have every instantaneous velocity between 0 and 100 m/s at some time during the interval, there must be some instant at which the instantaneous velocity is equal to the average velocity. (c) Because the spacecraft's instantaneous velocity is constant, its instantaneous velocity at any time and its average velocity over any time interval are the same. Consider the following one-dimensional motions: (a) A ball thrown directly upward rises to a highest point and falls back into the thrower's hand. (b) A race car starts from rest and speeds up to 100 m/s. (c) A spacecraft drifts through space at constant velocity. Are there any points in the motion of these objects at which the instantaneous velocity is the same as the average velocity over the entire motion? If so, identify the point(s). Solution (a) The average velocity for the thrown ball is zero because the ball returns to the starting point; thus its displacement is zero. (Remember that average velocity is de- EXAMPLE 2.6 Entering the Traffic Flow of ax , but that value is hard to guess directly. The other three variables involved in kinematics are position, velocity, and time. Velocity is probably the easiest one to approximate. Let us assume a final velocity of 100 km/h, so that you can merge with traffic. We multiply this value by 1 000 to convert kilome- (a) Estimate your average acceleration as you drive up the entrance ramp to an interstate highway. Solution This problem involves more than our usual amount of estimating! We are trying to come up with a value 38 CHAPTER 2 Motion in One Dimension yields results that are not too different from those derived from careful measurements. (b) How far did you go during the first half of the time interval during which you accelerated? ters to meters and then divide by 3 600 to convert hours to seconds. These two calculations together are roughly equivalent to dividing by 3. In fact, let us just say that the final velocity is vx f 30 m/s. (Remember, you can get away with this type of approximation and with dropping digits when performing mental calculations. If you were starting with British units, you could approximate 1 mi/h as roughly 0.5 m/s and continue from there.) Now we assume that you started up the ramp at about onethird your final velocity, so that vxi 10 m/s. Finally, we assume that it takes about 10 s to get from vxi to vxf , basing this guess on our previous experience in automobiles. We can then find the acceleration, using Equation 2.8: ax vxf t vxi 30 m/s 10 m/s 10 s 2 m/s2 Solution We can calculate the distance traveled during the first 5 s from Equation 2.11: xf xi v xi t 50 m 1 2 2a x t (10 m/s)(5 s) 75 m 1 2 (2 m/s2)(5 s)2 25 m Granted, we made many approximations along the way, but this type of mental effort can be surprisingly useful and often This result indicates that if you had not accelerated, your initial velocity of 10 m/s would have resulted in a 50-m movement up the ramp during the first 5 s. The additional 25 m is the result of your increasing velocity during that interval. Do not be afraid to attempt making educated guesses and doing some fairly drastic number rounding to simplify mental calculations. Physicists engage in this type of thought analysis all the time. EXAMPLE 2.7 Carrier Landing (b) What is the displacement of the plane while it is stopping? A jet lands on an aircraft carrier at 140 mi/h ( 63 m/s). (a) What is its acceleration if it stops in 2.0 s? Solution We define our x axis as the direction of motion of the jet. A careful reading of the problem reveals that in addition to being given the initial speed of 63 m/s, we also know that the final speed is zero. We also note that we are not given the displacement of the jet while it is slowing down. Equation 2.8 is the only equation in Table 2.2 that does not involve displacement, and so we use it to find the acceleration: ax vx f t vxi 0 63 m/s 2.0 s 31 m/s2 Solution We can now use any of the other three equations in Table 2.2 to solve for the displacement. Let us choose Equation 2.10: xf xi 1 2 (vxi vx f )t 1 2 (63 m/s 0)(2.0 s) 63 m If the plane travels much farther than this, it might fall into the ocean. Although the idea of using arresting cables to enable planes to land safely on ships originated at about the time of the First World War, the cables are still a vital part of the operation of modern aircraft carriers. EXAMPLE 2.8 Watch Out for the Speed Limit! catch up to the car. While all this is going on, the car continues to move. We should therefore expect our result to be well over 15 s. A sketch (Fig. 2.12) helps clarify the sequence of events. First, we write expressions for the position of each vehicle as a function of time. It is convenient to choose the position of the billboard as the origin and to set t B 0 as the time the trooper begins moving. At that instant, the car has already traveled a distance of 45.0 m because it has traveled at a constant speed of vx 45.0 m/s for 1 s. Thus, the initial position of the speeding car is x B 45.0 m. Because the car moves with constant speed, its accelera- A car traveling at a constant speed of 45.0 m/s passes a trooper hidden behind a billboard. One second after the speeding car passes the billboard, the trooper sets out from the billboard to catch it, accelerating at a constant rate of 3.00 m/s2. How long does it take her to overtake the car? Solution A careful reading lets us categorize this as a constant-acceleration problem. We know that after the 1-s delay in starting, it will take the trooper 15 additional seconds to accelerate up to 45.0 m/s. Of course, she then has to continue to pick up speed (at a rate of 3.00 m/s per second) to 2.5 v x car = 45.0 m/s a x car = 0 ax trooper = 3.00 m/s 2 tA = 1.00 s tB = 0 One-Dimensional Motion with Constant Acceleration 39 The trooper starts from rest at t 0 and accelerates at 3.00 m/s2 away from the origin. Hence, her position after any time interval t can be found from Equation 2.11: tC = ? xf x trooper xi 0 v xi t 0t 1 2 2a x t 1 2 2 a xt 1 2 (3.00 m/s2)t 2 The trooper overtakes the car at the instant her position matches that of the car, which is position : x trooper 1 2 (3.00 x car 45.0 m (45.0 m/s)t m/s2)t 2 This gives the quadratic equation 1.50t 2 45.0t 45.0 0 31.0 s . Figure 2.12 A speeding car passes a hidden police officer. The positive solution of this equation is t tion is zero, and applying Equation 2.11 (with a x for the car's position at any time t: x car xB v x cart 45.0 m (45.0 m/s)t 0) gives (For help in solving quadratic equations, see Appendix B.2.) Note that in this 31.0-s time interval, the trooper travels a distance of about 1440 m. [This distance can be calculated from the car's constant speed: (45.0 m/s)(31 1) s 1 440 m.] A quick check shows that at t 0, this expression gives the car's correct initial position when the trooper begins to move: x car x B 45.0 m. Looking at limiting cases to see whether they yield expected values is a very useful way to make sure that you are obtaining reasonable results. Exercise This problem can be solved graphically. On the same graph, plot position versus time for each vehicle, and from the intersection of the two curves determine the time at which the trooper overtakes the car. 2.6 FREELY FALLING OBJECTS It is now well known that, in the absence of air resistance, all objects dropped near the Earth's surface fall toward the Earth with the same constant acceleration under the influence of the Earth's gravity. It was not until about 1600 that this conclusion was accepted. Before that time, the teachings of the great philosopher Aristotle (384 322 B.C.) had held that heavier objects fall faster than lighter ones. It was the Italian Galileo Galilei (1564 1642) who originated our presentday ideas concerning falling objects. There is a legend that he demonstrated the law of falling objects by observing that two different weights dropped simultaneously from the Leaning Tower of Pisa hit the ground at approximately the same time. Although there is some doubt that he carried out this particular experiment, it is well established that Galileo performed many experiments on objects moving on inclined planes. In his experiments he rolled balls down a slight incline and measured the distances they covered in successive time intervals. The purpose of the incline was to reduce the acceleration; with the acceleration reduced, Galileo was able to make accurate measurements of the time intervals. By gradually increasing the slope of the incline, he was finally able to draw conclusions about freely falling objects because a freely falling ball is equivalent to a ball moving down a vertical incline. Astronaut David Scott released a hammer and a feather simultaneously, and they fell in unison to the lunar surface. (Courtesy of NASA) 40 CHAPTER 2 Motion in One Dimension QuickLab Use a pencil to poke a hole in the bottom of a paper or polystyrene cup. Cover the hole with your finger and fill the cup with water. Hold the cup up in front of you and release it. Does water come out of the hole while the cup is falling? Why or why not? Definition of free fall Free-fall acceleration g 9.80 m/s2 You might want to try the following experiment. Simultaneously drop a coin and a crumpled-up piece of paper from the same height. If the effects of air resistance are negligible, both will have the same motion and will hit the floor at the same time. In the idealized case, in which air resistance is absent, such motion is referred to as free fall. If this same experiment could be conducted in a vacuum, in which air resistance is truly negligible, the paper and coin would fall with the same acceleration even when the paper is not crumpled. On August 2, 1971, such a demonstration was conducted on the Moon by astronaut David Scott. He simultaneously released a hammer and a feather, and in unison they fell to the lunar surface. This demonstration surely would have pleased Galileo! When we use the expression freely falling object, we do not necessarily refer to an object dropped from rest. A freely falling object is any object moving freely under the influence of gravity alone, regardless of its initial motion. Objects thrown upward or downward and those released from rest are all falling freely once they are released. Any freely falling object experiences an acceleration directed downward, regardless of its initial motion. We shall denote the magnitude of the free-fall acceleration by the symbol g. The value of g near the Earth's surface decreases with increasing altitude. Furthermore, slight variations in g occur with changes in latitude. It is common to define "up" as the y direction and to use y as the position variable in the kinematic equations. At the Earth's surface, the value of g is approximately 9.80 m/s2. Unless stated otherwise, we shall use this value for g when performing calculations. For making quick estimates, use g 10 m/s2. If we neglect air resistance and assume that the free-fall acceleration does not vary with altitude over short vertical distances, then the motion of a freely falling object moving vertically is equivalent to motion in one dimension under constant acceleration. Therefore, the equations developed in Section 2.5 for objects moving with constant acceleration can be applied. The only modification that we need to make in these equations for freely falling objects is to note that the motion is in the vertical direction (the y direction) rather than in the horizontal (x) direction and that the acceleration is downward and has a magnitude of 9.80 m/s2. Thus, we g 9.80 m/s2, where the minus sign means that the acceleraalways take a y tion of a freely falling object is downward. In Chapter 14 we shall study how to deal with variations in g with altitude. CONCEPTUAL EXAMPLE 2.9 The Daring Sky Divers t after this instant, however, the two divers increase their speeds by the same amount because they have the same acceleration. Thus, the difference in their speeds remains the same throughout the fall. The first jumper always has a greater speed than the second. Thus, in a given time interval, the first diver covers a greater distance than the second. Thus, the separation distance between them increases. Once the distance between the divers reaches the length of the bungee cord, the tension in the cord begins to increase. As the tension increases, the distance between the divers becomes greater and greater. A sky diver jumps out of a hovering helicopter. A few seconds later, another sky diver jumps out, and they both fall along the same vertical line. Ignore air resistance, so that both sky divers fall with the same acceleration. Does the difference in their speeds stay the same throughout the fall? Does the vertical distance between them stay the same throughout the fall? If the two divers were connected by a long bungee cord, would the tension in the cord increase, lessen, or stay the same during the fall? Solution At any given instant, the speeds of the divers are different because one had a head start. In any time interval 2.6 Freely Falling Objects 41 EXAMPLE 2.10 Describing the Motion of a Tossed Ball The ball has gone as high as it will go. After the last half of this 1-s interval, the ball is moving at 5 m/s. (The minus sign tells us that the ball is now moving in the negative direction, that is, downward. Its velocity has changed from 5 m/s to 5 m/s during that 1-s interval. The change in velocity is still 5 [ 5] 10 m/s in that second.) It continues downward, and after another 1 s has elapsed, it is falling at a velocity of 15 m/s. Finally, after another 1 s, it has reached its original starting point and is moving downward at 25 m/s. If the ball had been tossed vertically off a cliff so that it could continue downward, its velocity would continue to change by about 10 m/s every second. A ball is tossed straight up at 25 m/s. Estimate its velocity at 1-s intervals. Solution Let us choose the upward direction to be positive. Regardless of whether the ball is moving upward or downward, its vertical velocity changes by approximately 10 m/s for every second it remains in the air. It starts out at 25 m/s. After 1 s has elapsed, it is still moving upward but at 15 m/s because its acceleration is downward (downward acceleration causes its velocity to decrease). After another second, its upward velocity has dropped to 5 m/s. Now comes the tricky part -- after another half second, its velocity is zero. CONCEPTUAL EXAMPLE 2.11 Follow the Bouncing Ball changes substantially during a very short time interval, and so the acceleration must be quite great. This corresponds to the very steep upward lines on the velocity time graph and to the spikes on the acceleration time graph. tA y(m) tB tC tD tE tF A tennis ball is dropped from shoulder height (about 1.5 m) and bounces three times before it is caught. Sketch graphs of its position, velocity, and acceleration as functions of time, with the y direction defined as upward. For our sketch let us stretch things out horizontally so that we can see what is going on. (Even if the ball were moving horizontally, this motion would not affect its vertical motion.) From Figure 2.13 we see that the ball is in contact with the floor at points , , and . Because the velocity of the ball changes from negative to positive three times during these bounces, the slope of the position time graph must change in the same way. Note that the time interval between bounces decreases. Why is that? During the rest of the ball's motion, the slope of the velocity time graph should be 9.80 m/s2. The acceleration time graph is a horizontal line at these times because the acceleration does not change when the ball is in free fall. When the ball is in contact with the floor, the velocity 1.5 Solution 1 0 t(s) vy (m/s) 4 0 t(s) 1.0 4 t(s) 0.5 ay (m/s2) 4 0.0 (a) 8 Figure 2.13 (a) A ball is dropped from a height of 1.5 m and bounces from the floor. (The horizontal motion is not considered here because it does not affect the vertical motion.) (b) Graphs of position, velocity, and acceleration versus time. 12 (b) 42 CHAPTER 2 Motion in One Dimension Quick Quiz 2.5 Which values represent the ball's velocity and acceleration at points 2.13? (a) (b) (c) (d) vy vy vy vy 0, a y 0 0, a y 9.80 m/s2 0, a y 9.80 m/s2 9.80 m/s, a y 0 , , and in Figure EXAMPLE 2.12 Not a Bad Throw for a Rookie! t B = 2.04 s y B = 20.4 m vy B = 0 A stone thrown from the top of a building is given an initial velocity of 20.0 m/s straight upward. The building is 50.0 m high, and the stone just misses the edge of the roof on its way down, as shown in Figure 2.14. Using t A 0 as the time the stone leaves the thrower's hand at position , determine (a) the time at which the stone reaches its maximum height, (b) the maximum height, (c) the time at which the stone returns to the height from which it was thrown, (d) the velocity of the stone at this instant, and (e) the velocity and position of the stone at t 5.00 s. Solution (a) As the stone travels from to , its velocity must change by 20 m/s because it stops at . Because gravity causes vertical velocities to change by about 10 m/s for every second of free fall, it should take the stone about 2 s to go from to in our drawing. (In a problem like this, a sketch definitely helps you organize your thoughts.) To calculate the time t B at which the stone reaches maximum height, we use Equation 2.8, v y B v y A a y t, noting that vy B 0 and setting the start of our clock readings at t A 0: 20.0 m/s t tB ( 9.80 m/s2)t 20.0 m/s 9.80 m/s2 0 2.04 s tA = 0 yA = 0 vy A = 20.0 m/s t C = 4.08 s yC = 0 vy C = 20.0 m/s Our estimate was pretty close. (b) Because the average velocity for this first interval is 10 m/s (the average of 20 m/s and 0 m/s) and because it travels for about 2 s, we expect the stone to travel about 20 m. By substituting our time interval into Equation 2.11, we can find the maximum height as measured from the position of the thrower, where we set y i y A 0: y max yB yB vy A t 1 2 2a y t 1 2( 50.0 m t D = 5.00 s y D = 22.5 s vy D = 29.0 m/s (20.0 m/s)(2.04 s) 20.4 m 9.80 m/s2)(2.04 s)2 t E = 5.83 s y E = 50.0 m vy E = 37.1 m/s Our free-fall estimates are very accurate. (c) There is no reason to believe that the stone's motion from to is anything other than the reverse of its motion Figure 2.14 Position and velocity versus time for a freely falling stone thrown initially upward with a velocity v yi 20.0 m/s. 2.7 Kinematic Equations Derived from Calculus 43 from to . Thus, the time needed for it to go from to should be twice the time needed for it to go from to . When the stone is back at the height from which it was thrown (position ), the y coordinate is again zero. Using Equation 2.11, with y f y C 0 and y i y A 0, we obtain yC yA 0 vy A t 20.0t 1 2 2a y t position . Because the elapsed time for this part of the motion is about 3 s, we estimate that the acceleration due to gravity will have changed the speed by about 30 m/s. We can calculate this from Equation 2.8, where we take t tD tB: vy D vy B a yt 0 m/s ( 9.80 m/s2)(5.00 s 2.04 s) 4.90t 2 29.0 m/s We could just as easily have made our calculation between positions and by making sure we use the correct time interval, t t D t A 5.00 s: vy D vyA a yt 20.0 m/s 29.0 m/s To demonstrate the power of our kinematic equations, we can use Equation 2.11 to find the position of the stone at t D 5.00 s by considering the change in position between a different pair of positions, and . In this case, the time is tD tC: yD yC 0m 1 2( This is a quadratic equation and so has two solutions for t t C . The equation can be factored to give t(20.0 One solution is t 4.90t) 0 0, corresponding to the time the stone 4.08 s, which is ( 9.80 m/s2)(5.00 s) starts its motion. The other solution is t the solution we are after. Notice that it is double the value we calculated for t B . (d) Again, we expect everything at to be the same as it is at , except that the velocity is now in the opposite direction. The value for t found in (c) can be inserted into Equation 2.8 to give vy C vy A a yt 20.0 m/s ( 9.80 m/s2)(4.08 s) v y Ct 1 2 2a y t ( 20.0 m/s)(5.00 s 9.80 m/s2)(5.00 s 4.08 s) 4.08 s)2 20.0 m/s The velocity of the stone when it arrives back at its original height is equal in magnitude to its initial velocity but opposite in direction. This indicates that the motion is symmetric. (e) For this part we consider what happens as the stone falls from position , where it had zero vertical velocity, to 22.5 m Exercise Find (a) the velocity of the stone just before it hits the ground at and (b) the total time the stone is in the air. (a) 37.1 m/s (b) 5.83 s Answer Optional Section 2.7 KINEMATIC EQUATIONS DERIVED FROM CALCULUS This is an optional section that assumes the reader is familiar with the techniques of integral calculus. If you have not yet studied integration in your calculus course, you should skip this section or cover it after you become familiar with integration. The velocity of a particle moving in a straight line can be obtained if its position as a function of time is known. Mathematically, the velocity equals the derivative of the position coordinate with respect to time. It is also possible to find the displacement of a particle if its velocity is known as a function of time. In calculus, the procedure used to perform this task is referred to either as integration or as finding the antiderivative. Graphically, it is equivalent to finding the area under a curve. Suppose the vx -t graph for a particle moving along the x axis is as shown in Figure 2.15. Let us divide the time interval t f t i into many small intervals, each of duration tn . From the definition of average velocity we see that the displacement during any small interval, such as the one shaded in Figure 2.15, is given by x n v xn t n , where v xn is the average velocity in that interval. Therefore, the displacement during this small interval is simply the area of the shaded rectangle. 44 CHAPTER 2 Motion in One Dimension vx Area = vxn tn vxn ti t n tf t Figure 2.15 Velocity versus time for a particle moving along the x axis. The area of the shaded rectangle is equal to the displacement x in the time interval tn , while the total area under the curve is the total displacement of the particle. The total displacement for the interval t f tangles: x n t i is the sum of the areas of all the recv xn t n where the symbol (upper case Greek sigma) signifies a sum over all terms. In this case, the sum is taken over all the rectangles from t i to tf . Now, as the intervals are made smaller and smaller, the number of terms in the sum increases and the sum approaches a value equal to the area under the velocity time graph. Therefore, in the limit n : , or t n : 0, the displacement is x or Displacement area under the vx -t graph lim tn:0 n vxn t n (2.13) Note that we have replaced the average velocity v xn with the instantaneous velocity vxn in the sum. As you can see from Figure 2.15, this approximation is clearly valid in the limit of very small intervals. We conclude that if we know the vx -t graph for motion along a straight line, we can obtain the displacement during any time interval by measuring the area under the curve corresponding to that time interval. The limit of the sum shown in Equation 2.13 is called a definite integral and is written tf Definite integral lim tn:0 n vxn t n ti vx(t) dt (2.14) where vx(t) denotes the velocity at any time t. If the explicit functional form of vx(t) is known and the limits are given, then the integral can be evaluated. Sometimes the vx -t graph for a moving particle has a shape much simpler than that shown in Figure 2.15. For example, suppose a particle moves at a constant ve- 2.7 vx vx = vxi = constant t vxi Kinematic Equations Derived from Calculus 45 Figure 2.16 The velocity time curve for a particle moving with constant velocity vxi . The displacement of the particle during the time interval t f t i is equal to the area of the shaded rectangle. vxi ti tf t locity vxi . In this case, the vx -t graph is a horizontal line, as shown in Figure 2.16, and its displacement during the time interval t is simply the area of the shaded rectangle: x v xi t (when v x f v xi constant) As another example, consider a particle moving with a velocity that is proportional to t, as shown in Figure 2.17. Taking vx a xt, where ax is the constant of proportionality (the acceleration), we find that the displacement of the particle during the time interval t 0 to t t A is equal to the area of the shaded triangle in Figure 2.17: x 1 2 (t A)(a xt A) 1 2 2a x t A Kinematic Equations We now use the defining equations for acceleration and velocity to derive two of our kinematic equations, Equations 2.8 and 2.11. The defining equation for acceleration (Eq. 2.6), ax may be written as dv x dvx dt a x dt or, in terms of an integral (or antiderivative), as vx a x dt C1 vx v x = a xt a xtA t tA Figure 2.17 The velocity time curve for a particle moving with a velocity that is proportional to the time. 46 CHAPTER 2 Motion in One Dimension where C1 is a constant of integration. For the special case in which the acceleration is constant, the ax can be removed from the integral to give vx ax dt C1 a xt C1 (2.15) vxi The value of C1 depends on the initial conditions of the motion. If we take vx when t 0 and substitute these values into the last equation, we have v xi C1 a x(0) v xi C1 Calling vx vx f the velocity after the time interval t has passed and substituting this and the value just found for C1 into Equation 2.15, we obtain kinematic Equation 2.8: vxf vxi a xt (for constant ax ) Now let us consider the defining equation for velocity (Eq. 2.4): vx We can write this as dx dx dt v x dt or in integral form as x v x dt C2 vx f v xi a xt, this ex- where C 2 is another constant of integration. Because v x pression becomes x x x (vxi vxi dt v xi t axt)dt ax 1 2 2a x t C2 t dt C2 x i when t 0. This gives C2 To find C 2 , we make use of the initial condition that x C 2 x i . Therefore, after substituting xf for x, we have xf xi v xit 1 2 2a x t (for constant ax ) Once we move xi to the left side of the equation, we have kinematic Equation 2.11. Recall that x f x i is equal to the displacement of the object, where xi is its initial position. 2.2 This is the Nearest One Head 47 Besides what you might expect to learn about physics concepts, a very valuable skill you should hope to take away from your physics course is the ability to solve complicated problems. The way physicists approach complex situations and break them down into manageable pieces is extremely useful. We have developed a memory aid to help you easily recall the steps required for successful problem solving. When working on problems, the secret is to keep your GOAL in mind! GOAL PROBLEM-SOLVING STEPS Gather information The first thing to do when approaching a problem is to understand the situation. Carefully read the problem statement, looking for key phrases like "at rest" or "freely falls." What information is given? Exactly what is the question asking? Don't forget to gather information from your own experiences and common sense. What should a reasonable answer look like? You wouldn't expect to calculate the speed of an automobile to be 5 106 m/s. Do you know what units to expect? Are there any limiting cases you can consider? What happens when an angle approaches 0 or 90 or when a mass becomes huge or goes to zero? Also make sure you carefully study any drawings that accompany the problem. Organize your approach Once you have a really good idea of what the problem is about, you need to think about what to do next. Have you seen this type of question before? Being able to classify a problem can make it much easier to lay out a plan to solve it. You should almost always make a quick drawing of the situation. Label important events with circled letters. Indicate any known values, perhaps in a table or directly on your sketch. Analyze the problem Because you have already categorized the problem, it should not be too difficult to select relevant equations that apply to this type of situation. Use algebra (and calculus, if necessary) to solve for the unknown variable in terms of what is given. Substitute in the appropriate numbers, calculate the result, and round it to the proper number of significant figures. Learn from your efforts This is the most important part. Examine your numerical answer. Does it meet your expectations from the first step? What about the algebraic form of the result -- before you plugged in numbers? Does it make sense? (Try looking at the variables in it to see whether the answer would change in a physically meaningful way if they were drastically increased or decreased or even became zero.) Think about how this problem compares with others you have done. How was it similar? In what critical ways did it differ? Why was this problem assigned? You should have learned something by doing it. Can you figure out what? When solving complex problems, you may need to identify a series of subproblems and apply the GOAL process to each. For very simple problems, you probably don't need GOAL at all. But when you are looking at a problem and you don't know what to do next, remember what the letters in GOAL stand for and use that as a guide. 47 48 CHAPTER 2 Motion in One Dimension SUMMARY After a particle moves along the x axis from some initial position xi to some final position xf , its displacement is (2.1) x xf xi The average velocity of a particle during some time interval is the displacement x divided by the time interval t during which that displacement occurred: vx x t (2.2) The average speed of a particle is equal to the ratio of the total distance it travels to the total time it takes to travel that distance. The instantaneous velocity of a particle is defined as the limit of the ratio x/ t as t approaches zero. By definition, this limit equals the derivative of x with respect to t, or the time rate of change of the position: vx lim t:0 x t dx dt (2.4) The instantaneous speed of a particle is equal to the magnitude of its velocity. The average acceleration of a particle is defined as the ratio of the change in its velocity vx divided by the time interval t during which that change occurred: ax vx t vx f tf v xi ti (2.5) The instantaneous acceleration is equal to the limit of the ratio vx / t as t approaches 0. By definition, this limit equals the derivative of vx with respect to t, or the time rate of change of the velocity: ax lim t:0 vx t dv x dt (2.6) The equations of kinematics for a particle moving along the x axis with uniform acceleration ax (constant in magnitude and direction) are vx f xf xf xi xi vx f 2 v xi v xt v xi t vxi 2 a xt 1 2 (v xi 1 2 2a x t (2.8) v x f )t (2.10) (2.11) x i) (2.12) 2ax(x f You should be able to use these equations and the definitions in this chapter to analyze the motion of any object moving with constant acceleration. An object falling freely in the presence of the Earth's gravity experiences a free-fall acceleration directed toward the center of the Earth. If air resistance is neglected, if the motion occurs near the surface of the Earth, and if the range of the motion is small compared with the Earth's radius, then the free-fall acceleration g is constant over the range of motion, where g is equal to 9.80 m/s2. Complicated problems are best approached in an organized manner. You should be able to recall and apply the steps of the GOAL strategy when you need them. Questions 49 QUESTIONS 1. Average velocity and instantaneous velocity are generally different quantities. Can they ever be equal for a specific type of motion? Explain. 2. If the average velocity is nonzero for some time interval, does this mean that the instantaneous velocity is never zero during this interval? Explain. 3. If the average velocity equals zero for some time interval t and if vx (t) is a continuous function, show that the instantaneous velocity must go to zero at some time in this interval. (A sketch of x versus t might be useful in your proof.) 4. Is it possible to have a situation in which the velocity and acceleration have opposite signs? If so, sketch a velocity time graph to prove your point. 5. If the velocity of a particle is nonzero, can its acceleration be zero? Explain. 6. If the velocity of a particle is zero, can its acceleration be nonzero? Explain. 7. Can an object having constant acceleration ever stop and stay stopped? 8. A stone is thrown vertically upward from the top of a building. Does the stone's displacement depend on the location of the origin of the coordinate system? Does the stone's velocity depend on the origin? (Assume that the coordinate system is stationary with respect to the building.) Explain. 9. A student at the top of a building of height h throws one ball upward with an initial speed vyi and then throws a second ball downward with the same initial speed. How do the final speeds of the balls compare when they reach the ground? 10. Can the magnitude of the instantaneous velocity of an object ever be greater than the magnitude of its average velocity? Can it ever be less? 11. If the average velocity of an object is zero in some time interval, what can you say about the displacement of the object for that interval? 12. A rapidly growing plant doubles in height each week. At the end of the 25th day, the plant reaches the height of a building. At what time was the plant one-fourth the height of the building? 13. Two cars are moving in the same direction in parallel lanes along a highway. At some instant, the velocity of car A exceeds the velocity of car B. Does this mean that the acceleration of car A is greater than that of car B? Explain. 14. An apple is dropped from some height above the Earth's surface. Neglecting air resistance, how much does the apple's speed increase each second during its descent? 15. Consider the following combinations of signs and values for velocity and acceleration of a particle with respect to a one-dimensional x axis: Velocity a. b. c. d. e. f. g. h. Positive Positive Positive Negative Negative Negative Zero Zero Acceleration Positive Negative Zero Positive Negative Zero Positive Negative Describe what the particle is doing in each case, and give a real-life example for an automobile on an east-west one-dimensional axis, with east considered to be the positive direction. 16. A pebble is dropped into a water well, and the splash is heard 16 s later, as illustrated in Figure Q2.16. Estimate the distance from the rim of the well to the water's surface. 17. Average velocity is an entirely contrived quantity, and other combinations of data may prove useful in other contexts. For example, the ratio t/ x, called the "slowness" of a moving object, is used by geophysicists when discussing the motion of continental plates. Explain what this quantity means. Figure Q2.16 50 CHAPTER 2 Motion in One Dimension PROBLEMS 1, 2, 3 = straightforward, intermediate, challenging = full solution available in the Student Solutions Manual and Study Guide WEB = solution posted at http://www.saunderscollege.com/physics/ = Computer useful in solving problem = Interactive Physics = paired numerical/symbolic problems Section 2.1 Displacement, Velocity, and Speed 1. The position of a pinewood derby car was observed at various times; the results are summarized in the table below. Find the average velocity of the car for (a) the first second, (b) the last 3 s, and (c) the entire period of observation. x (m) t (s) 0 0 2.3 1.0 9.2 2.0 20.7 3.0 36.8 4.0 57.5 5.0 6. A person first walks at a constant speed v 1 along a straight line from A to B and then back along the line from B to A at a constant speed v 2 . What are (a) her average speed over the entire trip and (b) her average velocity over the entire trip? Section 2.2 Instantaneous Velocity and Speed 2. A motorist drives north for 35.0 min at 85.0 km/h and then stops for 15.0 min. He then continues north, traveling 130 km in 2.00 h. (a) What is his total displacement? (b) What is his average velocity? 3. The displacement versus time for a certain particle moving along the x axis is shown in Figure P2.3. Find the average velocity in the time intervals (a) 0 to 2 s, (b) 0 to 4 s, (c) 2 s to 4 s, (d) 4 s to 7 s, (e) 0 to 8 s. WEB x(m) 10 8 6 4 2 0 2 4 6 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 t(s) 7. At t 1.00 s, a particle moving with constant velocity is located at x 3.00 m, and at t 6.00 s the particle is located at x 5.00 m. (a) From this information, plot the position as a function of time. (b) Determine the velocity of the particle from the slope of this graph. 8. The position of a particle moving along the x axis varies in time according to the expression x 3t 2, where x is in meters and t is in seconds. Evaluate its position (a) at t. (c) Evaluate the limit t 3.00 s and (b) at 3.00 s of x/ t as t approaches zero to find the velocity at t 3.00 s. 9. A position time graph for a particle moving along the x axis is shown in Figure P2.9. (a) Find the average velocity in the time interval t 1.5 s to t 4.0 s. (b) Determine the instantaneous velocity at t 2.0 s by measuring the slope of the tangent line shown in the graph. (c) At what value of t is the velocity zero? x(m) 12 10 8 6 4 2 Figure P2.3 Problems 3 and 11. 4. A particle moves according to the equation x where x is in meters and t is in seconds. (a) Find the average velocity for the time interval from 2.0 s to 3.0 s. (b) Find the average velocity for the time interval from 2.0 s to 2.1 s. 5. A person walks first at a constant speed of 5.00 m/s along a straight line from point A to point B and then back along the line from B to A at a constant speed of 3.00 m/s. What are (a) her average speed over the entire trip and (b) her average velocity over the entire trip? 10t 2, 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 t(s) Figure P2.9 10. (a) Use the data in Problem 1 to construct a smooth graph of position versus time. (b) By constructing tangents to the x(t) curve, find the instantaneous velocity of the car at several instants. (c) Plot the instantaneous velocity versus time and, from this, determine the average acceleration of the car. (d) What was the initial velocity of the car? Problems 11. Find the instantaneous velocity of the particle described in Figure P2.3 at the following times: (a) t 1.0 s, (b) t 3.0 s, (c) t 4.5 s, and (d) t 7.5 s. vx(m/s) 8 6 4 2 2 4 6 8 5 10 15 20 t(s) 51 Section 2.3 Acceleration 12. A particle is moving with a velocity of 60.0 m/s in the positive x direction at t 0. Between t 0 and t 15.0 s, the velocity decreases uniformly to zero. What was the acceleration during this 15.0-s interval? What is the significance of the sign of your answer? 13. A 50.0-g superball traveling at 25.0 m/s bounces off a brick wall and rebounds at 22.0 m/s. A high-speed camera records this event. If the ball is in contact with the wall for 3.50 ms, what is the magnitude of the average acceleration of the ball during this time interval? (Note: 1 ms 10 3 s.) 14. A particle starts from rest and accelerates as shown in Figure P2.14. Determine: (a) the particle's speed at t 10 s and at t 20 s, and (b) the distance traveled in the first 20 s. Figure P2.15 vx(m/s) 8 6 4 2 2 4 6 8 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 t(s) ax(m/s2) 2.0 1.0 Figure P2.16 0 5.0 1.0 10.0 15.0 20.0 t(s) 2.0 WEB 3.0 Figure P2.14 15. A velocity time graph for an object moving along the x axis is shown in Figure P2.15. (a) Plot a graph of the acceleration versus time. (b) Determine the average acceleration of the object in the time intervals t 5.00 s to t 15.0 s and t 0 to t 20.0 s. 16. A student drives a moped along a straight road as described by the velocity time graph in Figure P2.16. Sketch this graph in the middle of a sheet of graph paper. (a) Directly above your graph, sketch a graph of the position versus time, aligning the time coordinates of the two graphs. (b) Sketch a graph of the acceleration versus time directly below the vx -t graph, again aligning the time coordinates. On each graph, show the numerical values of x and ax for all points of inflection. (c) What is the acceleration at t 6 s? (d) Find the position (relative to the starting point) at t 6 s. (e) What is the moped's final position at t 9 s? 17. A particle moves along the x axis according to the equation x 2.00 3.00t t 2, where x is in meters and t is in seconds. At t 3.00 s, find (a) the position of the particle, (b) its velocity, and (c) its acceleration. 18. An object moves along the x axis according to the equation x (3.00t 2 2.00t 3.00) m. Determine (a) the average speed between t 2.00 s and t 3.00 s, (b) the instantaneous speed at t 2.00 s and at t 3.00 s, (c) the average acceleration between t 2.00 s and t 3.00 s, and (d) the instantaneous acceleration at t 2.00 s and t 3.00 s. 19. Figure P2.19 shows a graph of vx versus t for the motion of a motorcyclist as he starts from rest and moves along the road in a straight line. (a) Find the average acceleration for the time interval t 0 to t 6.00 s. (b) Estimate the time at which the acceleration has its greatest positive value and the value of the acceleration at that instant. (c) When is the acceleration zero? (d) Estimate the maximum negative value of the acceleration and the time at which it occurs. 52 vx(m/s) 10 8 6 4 2 0 2 4 6 CHAPTER 2 Motion in One Dimension vx(m/s) 50 40 30 a b 8 10 12 t(s) 20 10 0 10 20 30 40 c 50 t(s) Figure P2.19 Section 2.4 Motion Diagrams 20. Draw motion diagrams for (a) an object moving to the right at constant speed, (b) an object moving to the right and speeding up at a constant rate, (c) an object moving to the right and slowing down at a constant rate, (d) an object moving to the left and speeding up at a constant rate, and (e) an object moving to the left and slowing down at a constant rate. (f) How would your drawings change if the changes in speed were not uniform; that is, if the speed were not changing at a constant rate? Figure P2.26 celeration versus time between t 0 and t 50 s. (d) Write an equation for x as a function of time for each phase of the motion, represented by (i) 0a, (ii) ab, (iii) bc. (e) What is the average velocity of the car between t 0 and t 50 s? A particle moves along the x axis. Its position is given by the equation x 2.00 3.00t 4.00t 2 with x in meters and t in seconds. Determine (a) its position at the instant it changes direction and (b) its velocity when it returns to the position it had at t 0. The initial velocity of a body is 5.20 m/s. What is its velocity after 2.50 s (a) if it accelerates uniformly at 3.00 m/s2 and (b) if it accelerates uniformly at 3.00 m/s2 ? A drag racer starts her car from rest and accelerates at 10.0 m/s2 for the entire distance of 400 m (1 mi). (a) How 4 long did it take the race car to travel this distance? (b) What is the speed of the race car at the end of the run? A car is approaching a hill at 30.0 m/s when its engine suddenly fails, just at the bottom of the hill. The car moves with a constant acceleration of 2.00 m/s2 while coasting up the hill. (a) Write equations for the position along the slope and for the velocity as functions of time, taking x 0 at the bottom of the hill, where vi 30.0 m/s. (b) Determine the maximum distance the car travels up the hill. A jet plane lands with a speed of 100 m/s and can accelerate at a maximum rate of 5.00 m/s2 as it comes to rest. (a) From the instant the plane touches the runway, what is the minimum time it needs before it can come to rest? (b) Can this plane land at a small tropical island airport where the runway is 0.800 km long? The driver of a car slams on the brakes when he sees a tree blocking the road. The car slows uniformly with an acceleration of 5.60 m/s2 for 4.20 s, making straight skid marks 62.4 m long ending at the tree. With what speed does the car then strike the tree? Help! One of our equations is missing! We describe constant-acceleration motion with the variables and parameters vxi , vx f , ax , t, and xf xi . Of the equations in Table 2.2, the first does not involve x f x i . The second does not contain ax , the third omits vx f , and the last 27. Section 2.5 One-Dimensional Motion with Constant Acceleration 21. Jules Verne in 1865 proposed sending people to the Moon by firing a space capsule from a 220-m-long cannon with a final velocity of 10.97 km/s. What would have been the unrealistically large acceleration experienced by the space travelers during launch? Compare your answer with the free-fall acceleration, 9.80 m/s2. 22. A certain automobile manufacturer claims that its superdeluxe sports car will accelerate from rest to a speed of 42.0 m/s in 8.00 s. Under the (improbable) assumption that the acceleration is constant, (a) determine the acceleration of the car. (b) Find the distance the car travels in the first 8.00 s. (c) What is the speed of the car 10.0 s after it begins its motion, assuming it continues to move with the same acceleration? 23. A truck covers 40.0 m in 8.50 s while smoothly slowing down to a final speed of 2.80 m/s. (a) Find its original speed. (b) Find its acceleration. 24. The minimum distance required to stop a car moving at 35.0 mi/h is 40.0 ft. What is the minimum stopping distance for the same car moving at 70.0 mi/h, assuming the same rate of acceleration? 25. A body moving with uniform acceleration has a velocity of 12.0 cm/s in the positive x direction when its x coordinate is 3.00 cm. If its x coordinate 2.00 s later is 5.00 cm, what is the magnitude of its acceleration? 26. Figure P2.26 represents part of the performance data of a car owned by a proud physics student. (a) Calculate from the graph the total distance traveled. (b) What distance does the car travel between the times t 10 s and t 40 s? (c) Draw a graph of its ac28. 29. 30. 31. 32. WEB 33. Problems 53 Figure P2.37 (Left) Col. John Stapp on rocket sled. (Courtesy of the U.S. Air Force) (Right) Col. Stapp's face is contorted by the stress of rapid negative acceleration. (Photri, Inc.) 34. 35. 36. 37. 38. 39. leaves out t. So to complete the set there should be an equation not involving vxi . Derive it from the others. Use it to solve Problem 32 in one step. An indestructible bullet 2.00 cm long is fired straight through a board that is 10.0 cm thick. The bullet strikes the board with a speed of 420 m/s and emerges with a speed of 280 m/s. (a) What is the average acceleration of the bullet as it passes through the board? (b) What is the total time that the bullet is in contact with the board? (c) What thickness of board (calculated to 0.1 cm) would it take to stop the bullet, assuming the bullet's acceleration through all parts of the board is the same? A truck on a straight road starts from rest, accelerating at 2.00 m/s2 until it reaches a speed of 20.0 m/s. Then the truck travels for 20.0 s at constant speed until the brakes are applied, stopping the truck in a uniform manner in an additional 5.00 s. (a) How long is the truck in motion? (b) What is the average velocity of the truck for the motion described? A train is traveling down a straight track at 20.0 m/s when the engineer applies the brakes. This results in an acceleration of 1.00 m/s2 as long as the train is in motion. How far does the train move during a 40.0-s time interval starting at the instant the brakes are applied? For many years the world's land speed record was held by Colonel John P. Stapp, USAF (Fig. P2.37). On March 19, 1954, he rode a rocket-propelled sled that moved down the track at 632 mi/h. He and the sled were safely brought to rest in 1.40 s. Determine (a) the negative acceleration he experienced and (b) the distance he traveled during this negative acceleration. An electron in a cathode-ray tube (CRT) accelerates uniformly from 2.00 104 m/s to 6.00 106 m/s over 1.50 cm. (a) How long does the electron take to travel this 1.50 cm? (b) What is its acceleration? A ball starts from rest and accelerates at 0.500 m/s2 while moving down an inclined plane 9.00 m long. When it reaches the bottom, the ball rolls up another plane, where, after moving 15.0 m, it comes to rest. (a) What is the speed of the ball at the bottom of the first plane? (b) How long does it take to roll down the first plane? (c) What is the acceleration along the second plane? (d) What is the ball's speed 8.00 m along the second plane? 40. Speedy Sue, driving at 30.0 m/s, enters a one-lane tunnel. She then observes a slow-moving van 155 m ahead traveling at 5.00 m/s. Sue applies her brakes but can accelerate only at 2.00 m/s2 because the road is wet. Will there be a collision? If so, determine how far into the tunnel and at what time the collision occurs. If not, determine the distance of closest approach between Sue's car and the van. Section 2.6 Freely Falling Objects Note: In all problems in this section, ignore the effects of air resistance. 41. A golf ball is released from rest from the top of a very tall building. Calculate (a) the position and (b) the velocity of the ball after 1.00 s, 2.00 s, and 3.00 s. 42. Every morning at seven o'clock There's twenty terriers drilling on the rock. The boss comes around and he says, "Keep still And bear down heavy on the cast-iron drill And drill, ye terriers, drill." And drill, ye terriers, drill. It's work all day for sugar in your tea . . . And drill, ye terriers, drill. One day a premature blast went off And a mile in the air went big Jim Goff. And drill . . . Then when next payday came around Jim Goff a dollar short was found. When he asked what for, came this reply: "You were docked for the time you were up in the sky." And drill . . . --American folksong What was Goff's hourly wage? State the assumptions you make in computing it. 54 CHAPTER 2 Motion in One Dimension WEB 43. A student throws a set of keys vertically upward to her sorority sister, who is in a window 4.00 m above. The keys are caught 1.50 s later by the sister's outstretched hand. (a) With what initial velocity were the keys thrown? (b) What was the velocity of the keys just before they were caught? 44. A ball is thrown directly downward with an initial speed of 8.00 m/s from a height of 30.0 m. How many seconds later does the ball strike the ground? 45. Emily challenges her friend David to catch a dollar bill as follows: She holds the bill vertically, as in Figure P2.45, with the center of the bill between David's index finger and thumb. David must catch the bill after Emily releases it without moving his hand downward. If his reaction time is 0.2 s, will he succeed? Explain your reasoning. WEB 49. A daring ranch hand sitting on a tree limb wishes to drop vertically onto a horse galloping under the tree. The speed of the horse is 10.0 m/s, and the distance from the limb to the saddle is 3.00 m. (a) What must be the horizontal distance between the saddle and limb when the ranch hand makes his move? (b) How long is he in the air? 50. A ball thrown vertically upward is caught by the thrower after 20.0 s. Find (a) the initial velocity of the ball and (b) the maximum height it reaches. 51. A ball is thrown vertically upward from the ground with an initial speed of 15.0 m/s. (a) How long does it take the ball to reach its maximum altitude? (b) What is its maximum altitude? (c) Determine the velocity and acceleration of the ball at t 2.00 s. 52. The height of a helicopter above the ground is given by h 3.00t 3, where h is in meters and t is in seconds. After 2.00 s, the helicopter releases a small mailbag. How long after its release does the mailbag reach the ground? (Optional) 2.7 Kinematic Equations Derived from Calculus 53. Automotive engineers refer to the time rate of change of acceleration as the "jerk." If an object moves in one dimension such that its jerk J is constant, (a) determine expressions for its acceleration ax , velocity vx , and position x, given that its initial acceleration, speed, and position are ax i , vx i , and x i , respectively. (b) Show that a x2 a xi2 2J(v x v xi). 54. The speed of a bullet as it travels down the barrel of a rifle toward the opening is given by the expression v ( 5.0 10 7)t 2 (3.0 10 5)t, where v is in meters per second and t is in seconds. The acceleration of the bullet just as it leaves the barrel is zero. (a) Determine the acceleration and position of the bullet as a function of time when the bullet is in the barrel. (b) Determine the length of time the bullet is accelerated. (c) Find the speed at which the bullet leaves the barrel. (d) What is the length of the barrel? 55. The acceleration of a marble in a certain fluid is proportional to the speed of the marble squared and is given (in SI units) by a 3.00v 2 for v 0. If the marble enters this fluid with a speed of 1.50 m/s, how long will it take before the marble's speed is reduced to half of its initial value? Figure P2.45 (George Semple) 46. A ball is dropped from rest from a height h above the ground. Another ball is thrown vertically upward from the ground at the instant the first ball is released. Determine the speed of the second ball if the two balls are to meet at a height h/2 above the ground. 47. A baseball is hit so that it travels straight upward after being struck by the bat. A fan observes that it takes 3.00 s for the ball to reach its maximum height. Find (a) its initial velocity and (b) the maximum height it reaches. 48. A woman is reported to have fallen 144 ft from the 17th floor of a building, landing on a metal ventilator box, which she crushed to a depth of 18.0 in. She suffered only minor injuries. Calculate (a) the speed of the woman just before she collided with the ventilator box, (b) her average acceleration while in contact with the box, and (c) the time it took to crush the box. ADDITIONAL PROBLEMS 56. A motorist is traveling at 18.0 m/s when he sees a deer in the road 38.0 m ahead. (a) If the maximum negative acceleration of the vehicle is 4.50 m/s2, what is the maximum reaction time t of the motorist that will allow him to avoid hitting the deer? (b) If his reaction time is actually 0.300 s, how fast will he be traveling when he hits the deer? Problems 57. Another scheme to catch the roadrunner has failed. A safe falls from rest from the top of a 25.0-m-high cliff toward Wile E. Coyote, who is standing at the base. Wile first notices the safe after it has fallen 15.0 m. How long does he have to get out of the way? 58. A dog's hair has been cut and is now getting longer by 1.04 mm each day. With winter coming on, this rate of hair growth is steadily increasing by 0.132 mm/day every week. By how much will the dog's hair grow during five weeks? 59. A test rocket is fired vertically upward from a well. A catapult gives it an initial velocity of 80.0 m/s at ground level. Subsequently, its engines fire and it accelerates upward at 4.00 m/s2 until it reaches an altitude of 1000 m. At that point its engines fail, and the rocket goes into free fall, with an acceleration of 9.80 m/s2. (a) How long is the rocket in motion above the ground? (b) What is its maximum altitude? (c) What is its velocity just before it collides with the Earth? (Hint: Consider the motion while the engine is operating separate from the free-fall motion.) 60. A motorist drives along a straight road at a constant speed of 15.0 m/s. Just as she passes a parked motorcycle police officer, the officer starts to accelerate at 2.00 m/s2 to overtake her. Assuming the officer maintains this acceleration, (a) determine the time it takes the police officer to reach the motorist. Also find (b) the speed and (c) the total displacement of the officer as he overtakes the motorist. 61. In Figure 2.10a, the area under the velocity time curve between the vertical axis and time t (vertical dashed line) represents the displacement. As shown, this area consists of a rectangle and a triangle. Compute their areas and compare the sum of the two areas with the expression on the righthand side of Equation 2.11. 62. A commuter train travels between two downtown stations. Because the stations are only 1.00 km apart, the train never reaches its maximum possible cruising speed. The engineer minimizes the time t between the two stations by accelerating at a rate a1 0.100 m/s2 for a time t 1 and then by braking with acceleration a2 0.500 m/s2 for a time t 2 . Find the minimum time of travel t and the time t 1 . 63. In a 100-m race, Maggie and Judy cross the finish line in a dead heat, both taking 10.2 s. Accelerating uniformly, Maggie took 2.00 s and Judy 3.00 s to attain maximum speed, which they maintained for the rest of the race. (a) What was the acceleration of each sprinter? (b) What were their respective maximum speeds? (c) Which sprinter was ahead at the 6.00-s mark, and by how much? 64. A hard rubber ball, released at chest height, falls to the pavement and bounces back to nearly the same height. When it is in contact with the pavement, the lower side of the ball is temporarily flattened. Suppose the maximum depth of the dent is on the order of 55 65. 66. 67. 68. 69. 70. 1 cm. Compute an order-of-magnitude estimate for the maximum acceleration of the ball while it is in contact with the pavement. State your assumptions, the quantities you estimate, and the values you estimate for them. A teenager has a car that speeds up at 3.00 m/s2 and slows down at 4.50 m/s2. On a trip to the store, he accelerates from rest to 12.0 m/s, drives at a constant speed for 5.00 s, and then comes to a momentary stop at an intersection. He then accelerates to 18.0 m/s, drives at a constant speed for 20.0 s, slows down for 2.67 s, continues for 4.00 s at this speed, and then comes to a stop. (a) How long does the trip take? (b) How far has he traveled? (c) What is his average speed for the trip? (d) How long would it take to walk to the store and back if he walks at 1.50 m/s? A rock is dropped from rest into a well. (a) If the sound of the splash is heard 2.40 s later, how far below the top of the well is the surface of the water? The speed of sound in air (at the ambient temperature) is 336 m/s. (b) If the travel time for the sound is neglected, what percentage error is introduced when the depth of the well is calculated? An inquisitive physics student and mountain climber climbs a 50.0-m cliff that overhangs a calm pool of water. He throws two stones vertically downward, 1.00 s apart, and observes that they cause a single splash. The first stone has an initial speed of 2.00 m/s. (a) How long after release of the first stone do the two stones hit the water? (b) What was the initial velocity of the second stone? (c) What is the velocity of each stone at the instant the two hit the water? A car and train move together along parallel paths at 25.0 m/s, with the car adjacent to the rear of the train. Then, because of a red light, the car undergoes a uniform acceleration of 2.50 m/s2 and comes to rest. It remains at rest for 45.0 s and then accelerates back to a speed of 25.0 m/s at a rate of 2.50 m/s2. How far behind the rear of the train is the car when it reaches the speed of 25.0 m/s, assuming that the speed of the train has remained 25.0 m/s? Kathy Kool buys a sports car that can accelerate at the rate of 4.90 m/s2. She decides to test the car by racing with another speedster, Stan Speedy. Both start from rest, but experienced Stan leaves the starting line 1.00 s before Kathy. If Stan moves with a constant acceleration of 3.50 m/s2 and Kathy maintains an acceleration of 4.90 m/s2, find (a) the time it takes Kathy to overtake Stan, (b) the distance she travels before she catches up with him, and (c) the speeds of both cars at the instant she overtakes him. To protect his food from hungry bears, a boy scout raises his food pack with a rope that is thrown over a tree limb at height h above his hands. He walks away from the vertical rope with constant velocity v boy , holding the free end of the rope in his hands (Fig. P2.70). 56 CHAPTER 2 Motion in One Dimension TABLE P2.72 Height of a Rock versus Time Time (s) 0.00 0.25 0.50 0.75 1.00 1.25 1.50 1.75 2.00 2.25 2.50 Height (m) 5.00 5.75 6.40 6.94 7.38 7.72 7.96 8.10 8.13 8.07 7.90 Time (s) 2.75 3.00 3.25 3.50 3.75 4.00 4.25 4.50 4.75 5.00 Height (m) 7.62 7.25 6.77 6.20 5.52 4.73 3.85 2.86 1.77 0.58 v a h m x vboy Figure P2.70 (a) Show that the speed v of the food pack is x(x 2 h 2) 1/2 v boy , where x is the distance he has walked away from the vertical rope. (b) Show that the acceleration a of the food pack is h 2(x 2 h 2) 3/2 v boy2. (c) What values do the acceleration and velocity have shortly after he leaves the point under the pack (x 0)? (d) What values do the pack's velocity and acceleration approach as the distance x continues to increase? 71. In Problem 70, let the height h equal 6.00 m and the speed v boy equal 2.00 m/s. Assume that the food pack starts from rest. (a) Tabulate and graph the speed time graph. (b) Tabulate and graph the acceleration time graph. (Let the range of time be from 0 to 5.00 s and the time intervals be 0.500 s.) 72. Astronauts on a distant planet toss a rock into the air. With the aid of a camera that takes pictures at a steady rate, they record the height of the rock as a function of time as given in Table P2.72. (a) Find the average velocity of the rock in the time interval between each measurement and the next. (b) Using these average veloci- ties to approximate instantaneous velocities at the midpoints of the time intervals, make a graph of velocity as a function of time. Does the rock move with constant acceleration? If so, plot a straight line of best fit on the graph and calculate its slope to find the acceleration. 73. Two objects, A and B, are connected by a rigid rod that has a length L. The objects slide along perpendicular guide rails, as shown in Figure P2.73. If A slides to the left with a constant speed v, find the speed of B when 60.0. y B y L x O A x v Figure P2.73 ANSWERS TO QUICK QUIZZES 2.1 Your graph should look something like the one in (a). This vx-t graph shows that the maximum speed is about 5.0 m/s, which is 18 km/h ( 11 mi/h), and so the driver was not speeding. Can you derive the acceleration time graph from the velocity time graph? It should look something like the one in (b). 2.2 (a) Yes. This occurs when the car is slowing down, so that the direction of its acceleration is opposite the direction of its motion. (b) Yes. If the motion is in the direction chosen as negative, a positive acceleration causes a decrease in speed. 2.3 The left side represents the final velocity of an object. The first term on the right side is the velocity that the object had initially when we started watching it. The second term is the change in that initial velocity that is caused by the acceleration. If this second term is positive, then the initial velocity has increased (v xf v x i ). If this term is negative, then the initial velocity has decreased (v xf v x i ). Answers to Quick Quizzes ax(m/s ) 2 57 6.0 4.0 2.0 0.0 vx(m/s) 0.60 0.40 0.20 t(s) 50 0.00 10 0.20 0.40 0.60 20 30 40 10 2.0 4.0 6.0 20 30 40 t(s) 50 (a) (b) 2.4 Graph (a) has a constant slope, indicating a constant acceleration; this is represented by graph (e). Graph (b) represents a speed that is increasing constantly but not at a uniform rate. Thus, the acceleration must be increasing, and the graph that best indicates this is (d). Graph (c) depicts a velocity that first increases at a constant rate, indicating constant acceleration. Then the velocity stops increasing and becomes constant, indicating zero acceleration. The best match to this situation is graph (f). 2.5 (c). As can be seen from Figure 2.13b, the ball is at rest for an infinitesimally short time at these three points. Nonetheless, gravity continues to act even though the ball is instantaneously not moving. P U Z Z L E R When this honeybee gets back to its hive, it will tell the other bees how to return to the food it has found. By moving in a special, very precisely defined pattern, the bee conveys to other workers the information they need to find a flower bed. Bees communicate by "speaking in vectors." What does the bee have to tell the other bees in order to specify where the flower bed is located relative to the hive? (E. Webber/Visuals Unlimited) c h a p t e r Vectors Chapter Outline 3.1 Coordinate Systems 3.2 Vector and Scalar Quantities 3.3 Some Properties of Vectors 3.4 Components of a Vector and Unit Vectors 58 3.1 Coordinate Systems 59 W 3.1 e often need to work with physical quantities that have both numerical and directional properties. As noted in Section 2.1, quantities of this nature are represented by vectors. This chapter is primarily concerned with vector algebra and with some general properties of vector quantities. We discuss the addition and subtraction of vector quantities, together with some common applications to physical situations. Vector quantities are used throughout this text, and it is therefore imperative that you master both their graphical and their algebraic properties. Q (3, 4) y (x, y) P (5, 3) x COORDINATE SYSTEMS O 2.2 Many aspects of physics deal in some form or other with locations in space. In Chapter 2, for example, we saw that the mathematical description of an object's motion requires a method for describing the object's position at various times. This description is accomplished with the use of coordinates, and in Chapter 2 we used the cartesian coordinate system, in which horizontal and vertical axes intersect at a point taken to be the origin (Fig. 3.1). Cartesian coordinates are also called rectangular coordinates. Sometimes it is more convenient to represent a point in a plane by its plane polar coordinates (r, ), as shown in Figure 3.2a. In this polar coordinate system, r is the distance from the origin to the point having cartesian coordinates (x, y), and is the angle between r and a fixed axis. This fixed axis is usually the positive x axis, and is usually measured counterclockwise from it. From the right triangle in Figure 3.2b, we find that sin y/r and that cos x/r. (A review of trigonometric functions is given in Appendix B.4.) Therefore, starting with the plane polar coordinates of any point, we can obtain the cartesian coordinates, using the equations x y r cos r sin (3.1) (3.2) Figure 3.1 Designation of points in a cartesian coordinate system. Every point is labeled with coordinates (x, y). y (x, y) r O (a) x Furthermore, the definitions of trigonometry tell us that tan r y x (3.3) y2 (3.4) y sin = r cos = x r tan = y x r y x 2 These four expressions relating the coordinates (x, y) to the coordinates (r, ) apply only when is defined, as shown in Figure 3.2a -- in other words, when positive is an angle measured counterclockwise from the positive x axis. (Some scientific calculators perform conversions between cartesian and polar coordinates based on these standard conventions.) If the reference axis for the polar angle is chosen to be one other than the positive x axis or if the sense of increasing is chosen differently, then the expressions relating the two sets of coordinates will change. x (b) Figure 3.2 (a) The plane polar coordinates of a point are represented by the distance r and the angle , where is measured counterclockwise from the positive x axis. (b) The right triangle used to relate (x, y) to (r, ). You may want to read Talking Apes and Dancing Bees (1997) by Betsy Wyckoff. Quick Quiz 3.1 Would the honeybee at the beginning of the chapter use cartesian or polar coordinates when specifying the location of the flower? Why? What is the honeybee using as an origin of coordinates? 60 CHAPTER 3 Vectors EXAMPLE 3.1 Polar Coordinates The cartesian coordinates of a point in the xy plane are (x, y) ( 3.50, 2.50) m, as shown in Figure 3.3. Find the polar coordinates of this point. y(m) Solution r x 2 y2 tan ( 3.50 m)2 y x ( 2.50 m)2 0.714 4.30 m 2.50 m 3.50 m 216 x(m) r 3.50, 2.50 Note that you must use the signs of x and y to find that the point lies in the third quadrant of the coordinate system. That is, 216 and not 35.5. Figure 3.3 are given. Finding polar coordinates when cartesian coordinates 3.2 2.3 VECTOR AND SCALAR QUANTITIES As noted in Chapter 2, some physical quantities are scalar quantities whereas others are vector quantities. When you want to know the temperature outside so that you will know how to dress, the only information you need is a number and the unit "degrees C" or "degrees F." Temperature is therefore an example of a scalar quantity, which is defined as a quantity that is completely specified by a number and appropriate units. That is, A scalar quantity is specified by a single value with an appropriate unit and has no direction. Other examples of scalar quantities are volume, mass, and time intervals. The rules of ordinary arithmetic are used to manipulate scalar quantities. If you are getting ready to pilot a small plane and need to know the wind velocity, you must know both the speed of the wind and its direction. Because direction is part of the information it gives, velocity is a vector quantity, which is defined as a physical quantity that is completely specified by a number and appropriate units plus a direction. That is, A vector quantity has both magnitude and direction. Another example of a vector quantity is displacement, as you know from Chapter 2. Suppose a particle moves from some point to some point along a straight path, as shown in Figure 3.4. We represent this displacement by drawing an arrow from to , with the tip of the arrow pointing away from the starting point. The direction of the arrowhead represents the direction of the displacement, and the length of the arrow represents the magnitude of the displacement. If the particle travels along some other path from to , such as the broken line in Figure 3.4, its displacement is still the arrow drawn from to . Figure 3.4 As a particle moves from to along an arbitrary path represented by the broken line, its displacement is a vector quantity shown by the arrow drawn from to . 3.3 Some Properties of Vectors 61 (a) (b) (c) (a) The number of apples in the basket is one example of a scalar quantity. Can you think of other examples? (Superstock) (b) Jennifer pointing to the right. A vector quantity is one that must be specified by both magnitude and direction. (Photo by Ray Serway) (c) An anemometer is a device meteorologists use in weather forecasting. The cups spin around and reveal the magnitude of the wind velocity. The pointer indicates the direction. (Courtesy of Peet Bros.Company, 1308 Doris Avenue, Ocean, NJ 07712) y In this text, we use a boldface letter, such as A, to represent a vector quantity. Another common method for vector notation that you should be aware of is the : use of an arrow over a letter, such as A . The magnitude of the vector A is written either A or A . The magnitude of a vector has physical units, such as meters for displacement or meters per second for velocity. 3.3 SOME PROPERTIES OF VECTORS O x Equality of Two Vectors For many purposes, two vectors A and B may be defined to be equal if they have the same magnitude and point in the same direction. That is, A B only if A B and if A and B point in the same direction along parallel lines. For example, all the vectors in Figure 3.5 are equal even though they have different starting points. This property allows us to move a vector to a position parallel to itself in a diagram without affecting the vector. Figure 3.5 These four vectors are equal because they have equal lengths and point in the same direction. Adding Vectors 2.4 The rules for adding vectors are conveniently described by geometric methods. To add vector B to vector A, first draw vector A, with its magnitude represented by a convenient scale, on graph paper and then draw vector B to the same scale with its tail starting from the tip of A, as shown in Figure 3.6. The resultant vector R A B is the vector drawn from the tail of A to the tip of B. This procedure is known as the triangle method of addition. For example, if you walked 3.0 m toward the east and then 4.0 m toward the north, as shown in Figure 3.7, you would find yourself 5.0 m from where you R = A + B B A Figure 3.6 When vector B is added to vector A, the resultant R is the vector that runs from the tail of A to the tip of B. 62 CHAPTER 3 Vectors m )2 =5 .0 m +( 4.0 D 4.0 m m )2 (3 .0 + C + D |R |= = tan1 ( 4.0 ) = 53 3.0 3.0 m R = A + B C B A Figure 3.7 Vector addition. Walking first 3.0 m due east and then 4.0 m due north leaves you R 5.0 m from your starting point. Figure 3.8 Geometric construction for summing four vectors. The resultant vector R is by definition the one that completes the polygon. started, measured at an angle of 53 north of east. Your total displacement is the vector sum of the individual displacements. A geometric construction can also be used to add more than two vectors. This is shown in Figure 3.8 for the case of four vectors. The resultant vector R A B C D is the vector that completes the polygon. In other words, R is the vector drawn from the tail of the first vector to the tip of the last vector. An alternative graphical procedure for adding two vectors, known as the parallelogram rule of addition, is shown in Figure 3.9a. In this construction, the tails of the two vectors A and B are joined together and the resultant vector R is the diagonal of a parallelogram formed with A and B as two of its four sides. When two vectors are added, the sum is independent of the order of the addition. (This fact may seem trivial, but as you will see in Chapter 11, the order is important when vectors are multiplied). This can be seen from the geometric construction in Figure 3.9b and is known as the commutative law of addition: Commutative law A B B A (3.5) When three or more vectors are added, their sum is independent of the way in which the individual vectors are grouped together. A geometric proof of this rule Commutative Law A B + + A B B = Figure 3.9 (a) In this construction, the resultant R is the diagonal of a parallelogram having sides A and B. (b) This construction shows that A B B A -- in other words, that vector addition is commutative. R A (a) R A (b) = B A B 3.3 Associative Law C B+C B A A Some Properties of Vectors 63 C) (B + (A + B) + + C C Figure 3.10 Geometric constructions for verifying the associative law of addition. A+B B for three vectors is given in Figure 3.10. This is called the associative law of addition: (3.6) A (B C) (A B) C In summary, a vector quantity has both magnitude and direction and also obeys the laws of vector addition as described in Figures 3.6 to 3.10. When two or more vectors are added together, all of them must have the same units. It would be meaningless to add a velocity vector (for example, 60 km/h to the east) to a displacement vector (for example, 200 km to the north) because they represent different physical quantities. The same rule also applies to scalars. For example, it would be meaningless to add time intervals to temperatures. A Associative law Negative of a Vector The negative of the vector A is defined as the vector that when added to A gives zero for the vector sum. That is, A ( A) 0. The vectors A and A have the same magnitude but point in opposite directions. Subtracting Vectors The operation of vector subtraction makes use of the definition of the negative of a vector. We define the operation A B as vector B added to vector A: A B A ( B) (3.7) The geometric construction for subtracting two vectors in this way is illustrated in Figure 3.11a. Another way of looking at vector subtraction is to note that the difference A B between two vectors A and B is what you have to add to the second vector to obtain the first. In this case, the vector A B points from the tip of the second vector to the tip of the first, as Figure 3.11b shows. Vector Subtraction B A C=AB B C=AB A (a) (b) B Figure 3.11 (a) This construction shows how to subtract vector B from vector A. The vector B is equal in magnitude to vector B and points in the opposite direction. To subtract B from A, apply the rule of vector addition to the combination of A and B: Draw A along some convenient axis, place the tail of B at the tip of A, and C is the difference A B. (b) A second way of looking at vector subtraction. The difference vector C A B is the vector that we must add to B to obtain A. 64 CHAPTER 3 Vectors EXAMPLE 3.2 A Vacation Trip ing out a calculation, you should sketch the vectors to check your results.) The displacement R is the resultant when the two individual displacements A and B are added. To solve the problem algebraically, we note that the magnitude of R can be obtained from the law of cosines as applied to the triangle (see Appendix B.4). With 180 60 120 and R 2 A2 B 2 2AB cos , we find that R A car travels 20.0 km due north and then 35.0 km in a direction 60.0 west of north, as shown in Figure 3.12. Find the magnitude and direction of the car's resultant displacement. Solution In this example, we show two ways to find the resultant of two vectors. We can solve the problem geometrically, using graph paper and a protractor, as shown in Figure 3.12. (In fact, even when you know you are going to be carryN W S E A2 B 2 2AB cos (20.0 km)2 (35.0 km)2 48.2 km 2(20.0 km)(35.0 km)cos 120 y(km) 40 B 60.0 The direction of R measured from the northerly direction can be obtained from the law of sines (Appendix B.4): sin B sin B sin R sin R 35.0 km sin 120 48.2 km 38.9 The resultant displacement of the car is 48.2 km in a direction 38.9 west of north. This result matches what we found graphically. 0.629 R 20 20 A 0 x(km) Figure 3.12 Graphical method for finding the resultant displacement vector R A B. Multiplying a Vector by a Scalar If vector A is multiplied by a positive scalar quantity m, then the product mA is a vector that has the same direction as A and magnitude mA. If vector A is multiplied by a negative scalar quantity m, then the product mA is directed opposite A. For example, the vector 5A is five times as long as A and points in the same direction as A; the vector 1 A is one-third the length of A and points in the 3 direction opposite A. y Quick Quiz 3.2 If vector B is added to vector A, under what condition does the resultant vector A magnitude A B ? Under what conditions is the resultant vector equal to zero? B have Ay A 3.4 x 2.5 COMPONENTS OF A VECTOR AND UNIT VECTORS O Ax Figure 3.13 Any vector A lying in the xy plane can be represented by a vector Ax lying along the x axis and by a vector Ay lying along the y axis, where A Ax Ay . The geometric method of adding vectors is not recommended whenever great accuracy is required or in three-dimensional problems. In this section, we describe a method of adding vectors that makes use of the projections of vectors along coordinate axes. These projections are called the components of the vector. Any vector can be completely described by its components. Consider a vector A lying in the xy plane and making an arbitrary angle with the positive x axis, as shown in Figure 3.13. This vector can be expressed as the 3.4 Components of a Vector and Unit Vectors 65 sum of two other vectors A x and A y . From Figure 3.13, we see that the three vectors form a right triangle and that A A x A y . (If you cannot see why this equality holds, go back to Figure 3.9 and review the parallelogram rule.) We shall often refer to the "components of a vector A," written A x and A y (without the boldface notation). The component A x represents the projection of A along the x axis, and the component A y represents the projection of A along the y axis. These components can be positive or negative. The component A x is positive if A x points in the positive x direction and is negative if A x points in the negative x direction. The same is true for the component A y . From Figure 3.13 and the definition of sine and cosine, we see that cos Ay /A. Hence, the components of A are Ax /A and that sin Ax Ay A cos A sin (3.8) (3.9) Components of the vector A These components form two sides of a right triangle with a hypotenuse of length A. Thus, it follows that the magnitude and direction of A are related to its components through the expressions A Ax2 tan 1 Ay2 Ay Ax (3.10) (3.11) Magnitude of A Direction of A Note that the signs of the components Ax and Ay depend on the angle . For example, if 120, then A x is negative and A y is positive. If 225, then both A x and A y are negative. Figure 3.14 summarizes the signs of the components when A lies in the various quadrants. When solving problems, you can specify a vector A either with its components A x and A y or with its magnitude and direction A and . y Ax negative Ay positive Ax negative Ay negative Ax positive Ay positive Ax positive Ay negative x Quick Quiz 3.3 Can the component of a vector ever be greater than the magnitude of the vector? Figure 3.14 The signs of the components of a vector A depend on the quadrant in which the vector is located. Suppose you are working a physics problem that requires resolving a vector into its components. In many applications it is convenient to express the components in a coordinate system having axes that are not horizontal and vertical but are still perpendicular to each other. If you choose reference axes or an angle other than the axes and angle shown in Figure 3.13, the components must be modified accordingly. Suppose a vector B makes an angle with the x axis defined in Figure 3.15. The components of B along the x and y axes are Bx B cos and By B sin , as specified by Equations 3.8 and 3.9. The magnitude and direction of B are obtained from expressions equivalent to Equations 3.10 and 3.11. Thus, we can express the components of a vector in any coordinate system that is convenient for a particular situation. y B By x O Unit Vectors Vector quantities often are expressed in terms of unit vectors. A unit vector is a dimensionless vector having a magnitude of exactly 1. Unit vectors are used to specify a given direction and have no other physical significance. They are used solely as a convenience in describing a direction in space. We shall use the symbols Bx Figure 3.15 The component vectors of B in a coordinate system that is tilted. 66 CHAPTER 3 Vectors i, j, and k to represent unit vectors pointing in the positive x, y, and z directions, respectively. The unit vectors i, j, and k form a set of mutually perpendicular vectors in a right-handed coordinate system, as shown in Figure 3.16a. The magnitude of each unit vector equals 1; that is, i j k 1. Consider a vector A lying in the xy plane, as shown in Figure 3.16b. The product of the component Ax and the unit vector i is the vector Ax i, which lies on the x axis and has magnitude Ax . (The vector Ax i is an alternative representation of vector A x .) Likewise, A y j is a vector of magnitude Ay lying on the y axis. (Again, vector A y j is an alternative representation of vector A y .) Thus, the unit vector notation for the vector A is A Ax i Ay j (3.12) For example, consider a point lying in the xy plane and having cartesian coordinates (x, y), as in Figure 3.17. The point can be specified by the position vector r, which in unit vector form is given by Position vector r xi yj (3.13) This notation tells us that the components of r are the lengths x and y. Now let us see how to use components to add vectors when the geometric method is not sufficiently accurate. Suppose we wish to add vector B to vector A, where vector B has components Bx and By . All we do is add the x and y components separately. The resultant vector R A B is therefore y R or R x (Ax i Ay j) (Bx i By j) (3.14) (Ax Bx)i (Ay By)j Because R j Rx i R y j, we see that the components of the resultant vector are Rx Ry Ax Ay Bx By (3.15) i k z (a) y y y (x,y) By Ry A R B Ay j r Ay Ax A x Bx Rx Ax i (b) x O x Figure 3.16 (a) The unit vectors i, j, and k are directed along the x, y, and z axes, respectively. (b) Vector A Ax i Ay j lying in the xy plane has components Ax and Ay . Figure 3.17 The point whose cartesian coordinates are (x, y) can be represented by the position vector r xi yj. Figure 3.18 This geometric construction for the sum of two vectors shows the relationship between the components of the resultant R and the components of the individual vectors. 3.4 Components of a Vector and Unit Vectors 67 We obtain the magnitude of R and the angle it makes with the x axis from its components, using the relationships R R x2 R y2 tan (Ax Ry Rx Bx)2 Ay Ax By Bx (Ay By)2 (3.16) (3.17) We can check this addition by components with a geometric construction, as shown in Figure 3.18. Remember that you must note the signs of the components when using either the algebraic or the geometric method. At times, we need to consider situations involving motion in three component directions. The extension of our methods to three-dimensional vectors is straightforward. If A and B both have x, y, and z components, we express them in the form A B The sum of A and B is R (Ax Bx)i (Ay By)j (Az Bz)k (3.20) Ax i Bx i Ay j By j Az k Bz k (3.18) (3.19) QuickLab Write an expression for the vector describing the displacement of a fly that moves from one corner of the floor of the room that you are in to the opposite corner of the room, near the ceiling. Note that Equation 3.20 differs from Equation 3.14: in Equation 3.20, the resultant vector also has a z component R z Az Bz . Quick Quiz 3.4 If one component of a vector is not zero, can the magnitude of the vector be zero? Explain. Quick Quiz 3.5 If A B 0, what can you say about the components of the two vectors? Problem-Solving Hints Adding Vectors When you need to add two or more vectors, use this step-by-step procedure: Select a coordinate system that is convenient. (Try to reduce the number of components you need to find by choosing axes that line up with as many vectors as possible.) Draw a labeled sketch of the vectors described in the problem. Find the x and y components of all vectors and the resultant components (the algebraic sum of the components) in the x and y directions. If necessary, use the Pythagorean theorem to find the magnitude of the resultant vector and select a suitable trigonometric function to find the angle that the resultant vector makes with the x axis. 68 CHAPTER 3 Vectors EXAMPLE 3.3 A The Sum of Two Vectors The magnitude of R is given by Equation 3.16: R Find the sum of two vectors A and B lying in the xy plane and given by (2.0i 2.0j) m and B (2.0i 4.0j) m R x2 4.5 m R y2 (4.0 m)2 ( 2.0 m)2 20 m Solution Comparing this expression for A with the general expression A Ax i Ay j, we see that Ax 2.0 m and that Ay 2.0 m. Likewise, Bx 2.0 m and By 4.0 m. We obtain the resultant vector R, using Equation 3.14: R or Rx 4.0 m Ry 2.0 m A (4.0i B (2.0 2.0j) m 2.0)i m (2.0 4.0)j m We can find the direction of R from Equation 3.17: tan Ry Rx 2.0 m 4.0 m 0.50 Your calculator likely gives the answer 27 for tan 1( 0.50). This answer is correct if we interpret it to mean 27 clockwise from the x axis. Our standard form has been to quote the angles measured counterclockwise from the x axis, and that angle for this vector is 333. EXAMPLE 3.4 The Resultant Displacement mathematical calculation keeps track of this motion along the three perpendicular axes: R d1 (15 (12 (25i d2 23 31j d3 13)i cm 5.0 0)k cm 7.0k) cm 25 cm, (30 14 15)j cm A particle undergoes three consecutive displacements: d1 (15i 30j 12k) cm, d2 (23i 14j 5.0k) cm, and d3 ( 13i 15j) cm. Find the components of the resultant displacement and its magnitude. Solution Rather than looking at a sketch on flat paper, visualize the problem as follows: Start with your fingertip at the front left corner of your horizontal desktop. Move your fingertip 15 cm to the right, then 30 cm toward the far side of the desk, then 12 cm vertically upward, then 23 cm to the right, then 14 cm horizontally toward the front edge of the desk, then 5.0 cm vertically toward the desk, then 13 cm to the left, and (finally!) 15 cm toward the back of the desk. The The resultant displacement has components R x R y 31 cm, and R z 7.0 cm. Its magnitude is R R x 2 Ry2 Rz2 (31 cm)2 (7.0 cm)2 40 cm (25 cm)2 EXAMPLE 3.5 Taking a Hike y(km) A hiker begins a trip by first walking 25.0 km southeast from her car. She stops and sets up her tent for the night. On the second day, she walks 40.0 km in a direction 60.0 north of east, at which point she discovers a forest ranger's tower. (a) Determine the components of the hiker's displacement for each day. If we denote the displacement vectors on the first and second days by A and B, respectively, and use the car as the origin of coordinates, we obtain the vectors shown in Figure 3.19. Displacement A has a magnitude of 25.0 km and is directed 45.0 below the positive x axis. From Equations 3.8 and 3.9, its components are Ax Ay A cos( 45.0) A sin( 45.0) (25.0 km)(0.707) (25.0 km)(0.707) 17.7 km 17.7 km N W E S Tower R x(km) 45.0 20 A Tent 30 40 B 60.0 50 Solution 20 10 0 Car 10 20 Figure 3.19 R A B. The total displacement of the hiker is the vector 3.4 Components of a Vector and Unit Vectors 69 The negative value of Ay indicates that the hiker walks in the negative y direction on the first day. The signs of Ax and Ay also are evident from Figure 3.19. The second displacement B has a magnitude of 40.0 km and is 60.0 north of east. Its components are Bx By B cos 60.0 B sin 60.0 (40.0 km)(0.500) (40.0 km)(0.866) 20.0 km Rx Ry Ax Ay Bx By 17.7 km 17.7 km 20.0 km 34.6 km 37.7 km 16.9 km In unit vector form, we can write the total displacement as R 34.6 km (37.7i 16.9j) km (b) Determine the components of the hiker's resultant displacement R for the trip. Find an expression for R in terms of unit vectors. Exercise Determine the magnitude and direction of the total displacement. 41.3 km, 24.1 north of east from the car. Solution Answer A B The resultant displacement for the trip R has components given by Equation 3.15: EXAMPLE 3.6 Let's Fly Away! Displacement b, whose magnitude is 153 km, has the components bx by b cos(110) b sin(110) (153 km)( 0.342) (153 km)(0.940) 52.3 km 144 km A commuter airplane takes the route shown in Figure 3.20. First, it flies from the origin of the coordinate system shown to city A, located 175 km in a direction 30.0 north of east. Next, it flies 153 km 20.0 west of north to city B. Finally, it flies 195 km due west to city C. Find the location of city C relative to the origin. It is convenient to choose the coordinate system shown in Figure 3.20, where the x axis points to the east and the y axis points to the north. Let us denote the three consecutive displacements by the vectors a, b, and c. Displacement a has a magnitude of 175 km and the components ax ay a cos(30.0) a sin(30.0) y(km) C Solution Finally, displacement c, whose magnitude is 195 km, has the components cx cy c cos(180) c sin(180) (195 km)( 1) 0 195 km (175 km)(0.866) (175 km)(0.500) 152 km 87.5 km Therefore, the components of the position vector R from the starting point to city C are Rx ax bx cx 152 km 52.3 km 195 km 95.3 km N B 250 c 200 W 20.0 E S Ry ay by cy 87.5 km 144 km 0 232 km In unit vector notation, R ( 95.3i 232j) km. That 150 R 100 b 110 A 50 a 30.0 50 100 150 200 x(km) is, the airplane can reach city C from the starting point by first traveling 95.3 km due west and then by traveling 232 km due north. Exercise Answer Find the magnitude and direction of R. 251 km, 22.3 west of north. Figure 3.20 The airplane starts at the origin, flies first to city A, then to city B, and finally to city C. 70 CHAPTER 3 Vectors R=A+B R B A (a) B R A (b) Figure 3.21 (a) Vector addition by the triangle method. (b) Vector addition by the parallelogram rule. SUMMARY Scalar quantities are those that have only magnitude and no associated direction. Vector quantities have both magnitude and direction and obey the laws of vector addition. We can add two vectors A and B graphically, using either the triangle method or the parallelogram rule. In the triangle method (Fig. 3.21a), the resultant vector R A B runs from the tail of A to the tip of B. In the parallelogram method (Fig. 3.21b), R is the diagonal of a parallelogram having A and B as two of its sides. You should be able to add or subtract vectors, using these graphical methods. The x component Ax of the vector A is equal to the projection of A along the x axis of a coordinate system, as shown in Figure 3.22, where Ax A cos . The y component Ay of A is the projection of A along the y axis, where Ay A sin . Be sure you can determine which trigonometric functions you should use in all situations, especially when is defined as something other than the counterclockwise angle from the positive x axis. If a vector A has an x component Ax and a y component Ay , the vector can be expressed in unit vector form as A Ax i Ay j. In this notation, i is a unit vector pointing in the positive x direction, and j is a unit vector pointing in the positive y direction. Because i and j are unit vectors, i j 1. We can find the resultant of two or more vectors by resolving all vectors into their x and y components, adding their resultant x and y components, and then using the Pythagorean theorem to find the magnitude of the resultant vector. We can find the angle that the resultant vector makes with respect to the x axis by using a suitable trigonometric function. y Ay A O Ax x Figure 3.22 The addition of the two vectors Ax and Ay gives vector A. Note that Ax Ax i and Ay A y j, where Ax and Ay are the components of vector A. QUESTIONS 1. Two vectors have unequal magnitudes. Can their sum be zero? Explain. 2. Can the magnitude of a particle's displacement be greater than the distance traveled? Explain. 3. The magnitudes of two vectors A and B are A 5 units and B 2 units. Find the largest and smallest values possible for the resultant vector R A B. 4. Vector A lies in the xy plane. For what orientations of vector A will both of its components be negative? For what orientations will its components have opposite signs? 5. If the component of vector A along the direction of vector B is zero, what can you conclude about these two vectors? 6. Can the magnitude of a vector have a negative value? Explain. 7. Which of the following are vectors and which are not: force, temperature, volume, ratings of a television show, height, velocity, age? 8. Under what circumstances would a nonzero vector lying in the xy plane ever have components that are equal in magnitude? 9. Is it possible to add a vector quantity to a scalar quantity? Explain. Problems 71 PROBLEMS 1, 2, 3 = straightforward, intermediate, challenging = full solution available in the Student Solutions Manual and Study Guide WEB = solution posted at http://www.saunderscollege.com/physics/ = Computer useful in solving problem = Interactive Physics = paired numerical/symbolic problems Section 3.1 WEB Coordinate Systems 12. 1. The polar coordinates of a point are r 5.50 m and 240. What are the cartesian coordinates of this point? 2. Two points in the xy plane have cartesian coordinates (2.00, 4.00) m and ( 3.00, 3.00) m. Determine (a) the distance between these points and (b) their polar coordinates. 3. If the cartesian coordinates of a point are given by (2, y) and its polar coordinates are (r, 30), determine y and r. 4. Two points in a plane have polar coordinates (2.50 m, 30.0) and (3.80 m, 120.0). Determine (a) the cartesian coordinates of these points and (b) the distance between them. 5. A fly lands on one wall of a room. The lower left-hand corner of the wall is selected as the origin of a twodimensional cartesian coordinate system. If the fly is located at the point having coordinates (2.00, 1.00) m, (a) how far is it from the corner of the room? (b) what is its location in polar coordinates? 6. If the polar coordinates of the point (x, y) are (r, ), determine the polar coordinates for the points (a) ( x, y), (b) ( 2x, 2y), and (c) (3x, 3y). WEB 13. 14. WEB 15. ative x axis. Using graphical methods, find (a) the vector sum A B and (b) the vector difference A B. A force F1 of magnitude 6.00 units acts at the origin in a direction 30.0 above the positive x axis. A second force F2 of magnitude 5.00 units acts at the origin in the direction of the positive y axis. Find graphically the magnitude and direction of the resultant force F1 + F2 . A person walks along a circular path of radius 5.00 m. If the person walks around one half of the circle, find (a) the magnitude of the displacement vector and (b) how far the person walked. (c) What is the magnitude of the displacement if the person walks all the way around the circle? A dog searching for a bone walks 3.50 m south, then 8.20 m at an angle 30.0 north of east, and finally 15.0 m west. Using graphical techniques, find the dog's resultant displacement vector. Each of the displacement vectors A and B shown in Figure P3.15 has a magnitude of 3.00 m. Find graphically (a) A B, (b) A B, (c) B A, (d) A 2B. Report all angles counterclockwise from the positive x axis. y Section 3.2 Section 3.3 Vector and Scalar Quantities B Some Properties of Vectors 3.00 m A 7. An airplane flies 200 km due west from city A to city B and then 300 km in the direction 30.0 north of west from city B to city C. (a) In straight-line distance, how far is city C from city A? (b) Relative to city A, in what direction is city C? 8. A pedestrian moves 6.00 km east and then 13.0 km north. Using the graphical method, find the magnitude and direction of the resultant displacement vector. 9. A surveyor measures the distance across a straight river by the following method: Starting directly across from a tree on the opposite bank, she walks 100 m along the riverbank to establish a baseline. Then she sights across to the tree. The angle from her baseline to the tree is 35.0. How wide is the river? 10. A plane flies from base camp to lake A, a distance of 280 km at a direction 20.0 north of east. After dropping off supplies, it flies to lake B, which is 190 km and 30.0 west of north from lake A. Graphically determine the distance and direction from lake B to the base camp. 11. Vector A has a magnitude of 8.00 units and makes an angle of 45.0 with the positive x axis. Vector B also has a magnitude of 8.00 units and is directed along the neg- 3.0 30.0 O 0m x Figure P3.15 Problems 15 and 39. 16. Arbitrarily define the "instantaneous vector height" of a person as the displacement vector from the point halfway between the feet to the top of the head. Make an order-of-magnitude estimate of the total vector height of all the people in a city of population 100 000 (a) at 10 a.m. on a Tuesday and (b) at 5 a.m. on a Saturday. Explain your reasoning. 17. A roller coaster moves 200 ft horizontally and then rises 135 ft at an angle of 30.0 above the horizontal. It then travels 135 ft at an angle of 40.0 downward. What is its displacement from its starting point? Use graphical techniques. 18. The driver of a car drives 3.00 km north, 2.00 km northeast (45.0 east of north), 4.00 km west, and then 72 CHAPTER 3 Vectors lying in an east west vertical plane. The robot then moves the object upward along a second arc that forms one quarter of a circle having a radius of 3.70 cm and lying in a north south vertical plane. Find (a) the magnitude of the total displacement of the object and (b) the angle the total displacement makes with the vertical. Vector B has x, y, and z components of 4.00, 6.00, and 3.00 units, respectively. Calculate the magnitude of B and the angles that B makes with the coordinate axes. A vector has an x component of 25.0 units and a y component of 40.0 units. Find the magnitude and direction of this vector. A map suggests that Atlanta is 730 mi in a direction 5.00 north of east from Dallas. The same map shows that Chicago is 560 mi in a direction 21.0 west of north from Atlanta. Assuming that the Earth is flat, use this information to find the displacement from Dallas to Chicago. A displacement vector lying in the xy plane has a magnitude of 50.0 m and is directed at an angle of 120 to the positive x axis. Find the x and y components of this vector and express the vector in unit vector notation. If A 2.00i 6.00j and B 3.00i 2.00j, (a) sketch the vector sum C A B and the vector difference D A B. (b) Find solutions for C and D, first in terms of unit vectors and then in terms of polar coordinates, with angles measured with respect to the x axis. Find the magnitude and direction of the resultant of three displacements having x and y components (3.00, 2.00) m, ( 5.00, 3.00) m, and (6.00, 1.00) m. Vector A has x and y components of 8.70 cm and 15.0 cm, respectively; vector B has x and y components of 13.2 cm and 6.60 cm, respectively. If A B 3C 0, what are the components of C? Consider two vectors A 3i 2j and B i 4j. Calculate (a) A B, (b) A B, (c) A B , (d) A B , (e) the directions of A B and A B. A boy runs 3.00 blocks north, 4.00 blocks northeast, and 5.00 blocks west. Determine the length and direction of the displacement vector that goes from the starting point to his final position. Obtain expressions in component form for the position vectors having polar coordinates (a) 12.8 m, 150; (b) 3.30 cm, 60.0; (c) 22.0 in., 215. Consider the displacement vectors A (3i 3j) m, B (i 4j) m, and C ( 2i 5j) m. Use the component method to determine (a) the magnitude and direction of the vector D A B C and (b) the magnitude and direction of E A B C. A particle undergoes the following consecutive displacements: 3.50 m south, 8.20 m northeast, and 15.0 m west. What is the resultant displacement? In a game of American football, a quarterback takes the ball from the line of scrimmage, runs backward for 10.0 yards, and then sideways parallel to the line of scrimmage for 15.0 yards. At this point, he throws a forward 3.00 km southeast (45.0 east of south). Where does he end up relative to his starting point? Work out your answer graphically. Check by using components. (The car is not near the North Pole or the South Pole.) 19. Fox Mulder is trapped in a maze. To find his way out, he walks 10.0 m, makes a 90.0 right turn, walks 5.00 m, makes another 90.0 right turn, and walks 7.00 m. What is his displacement from his initial position? 24. Section 3.4 Components of a Vector and Unit Vectors 20. Find the horizontal and vertical components of the 100-m displacement of a superhero who flies from the top of a tall building following the path shown in Figure P3.20. y WEB 25. 26. 30.0 100 m x 27. 28. Figure P3.20 21. A person walks 25.0 north of east for 3.10 km. How far would she have to walk due north and due east to arrive at the same location? 22. While exploring a cave, a spelunker starts at the entrance and moves the following distances: She goes 75.0 m north, 250 m east, 125 m at an angle 30.0 north of east, and 150 m south. Find the resultant displacement from the cave entrance. 23. In the assembly operation illustrated in Figure P3.23, a robot first lifts an object upward along an arc that forms one quarter of a circle having a radius of 4.80 cm and 29. 30. 31. 32. 33. 34. 35. 36. Figure P3.23 Problems pass 50.0 yards straight downfield perpendicular to the line of scrimmage. What is the magnitude of the football's resultant displacement? 37. The helicopter view in Figure P3.37 shows two people pulling on a stubborn mule. Find (a) the single force that is equivalent to the two forces shown and (b) the force that a third person would have to exert on the mule to make the resultant force equal to zero. The forces are measured in units of newtons. 73 y F2 = 80.0 N 75.0 60.0 F1 = 120 N x Figure P3.37 38. A novice golfer on the green takes three strokes to sink the ball. The successive displacements are 4.00 m to the north, 2.00 m northeast, and 1.00 m 30.0 west of south. Starting at the same initial point, an expert golfer could make the hole in what single displacement? 39. Find the x and y components of the vectors A and B shown in Figure P3.15; then derive an expression for the resultant vector A B in unit vector notation. 40. You are standing on the ground at the origin of a coordinate system. An airplane flies over you with constant velocity parallel to the x axis and at a constant height of 7.60 103 m. At t 0, the airplane is directly above you, so that the vector from you to it is given by P0 (7.60 103 m)j. At t 30.0 s, the position vector leading from you to the airplane is P30 (8.04 103 m)i (7.60 103 m)j. Determine the magnitude and orientation of the airplane's position vector at t 45.0 s. 41. A particle undergoes two displacements. The first has a magnitude of 150 cm and makes an angle of 120 with the positive x axis. The resultant displacement has a magnitude of 140 cm and is directed at an angle of 35.0 to the positive x axis. Find the magnitude and direction of the second displacement. 42. Vectors A and B have equal magnitudes of 5.00. If the sum of A and B is the vector 6.00 j, determine the angle between A and B. 43. The vector A has x, y, and z components of 8.00, 12.0, and 4.00 units, respectively. (a) Write a vector expression for A in unit vector notation. (b) Obtain a unit vector expression for a vector B one-fourth the length of A pointing in the same direction as A. (c) Obtain a unit vector expression for a vector C three times the length of A pointing in the direction opposite the direction of A. 44. Instructions for finding a buried treasure include the following: Go 75.0 paces at 240, turn to 135 and walk 125 paces, then travel 100 paces at 160. The angles are measured counterclockwise from an axis pointing to the east, the x direction. Determine the resultant displacement from the starting point. 45. Given the displacement vectors A (3i 4j 4k) m and B (2i 3j 7k) m, find the magnitudes of the vectors (a) C A B and (b) D 2A B, also expressing each in terms of its x, y, and z components. 46. A radar station locates a sinking ship at range 17.3 km and bearing 136 clockwise from north. From the same station a rescue plane is at horizontal range 19.6 km, 153 clockwise from north, with elevation 2.20 km. (a) Write the vector displacement from plane to ship, letting i represent east, j north, and k up. (b) How far apart are the plane and ship? 47. As it passes over Grand Bahama Island, the eye of a hurricane is moving in a direction 60.0 north of west with a speed of 41.0 km/h. Three hours later, the course of the hurricane suddenly shifts due north and its speed slows to 25.0 km/h. How far from Grand Bahama is the eye 4.50 h after it passes over the island? 48. (a) Vector E has magnitude 17.0 cm and is directed 27.0 counterclockwise from the x axis. Express it in unit vector notation. (b) Vector F has magnitude 17.0 cm and is directed 27.0 counterclockwise from the y axis. Express it in unit vector notation. (c) Vector G has magnitude 17.0 cm and is directed 27.0 clockwise from the y axis. Express it in unit vector notation. 49. Vector A has a negative x component 3.00 units in length and a positive y component 2.00 units in length. (a) Determine an expression for A in unit vector notation. (b) Determine the magnitude and direction of A. (c) What vector B, when added to vector A, gives a resultant vector with no x component and a negative y component 4.00 units in length? 50. An airplane starting from airport A flies 300 km east, then 350 km at 30.0 west of north, and then 150 km north to arrive finally at airport B. (a) The next day, another plane flies directly from airport A to airport B in a straight line. In what direction should the pilot travel in this direct flight? (b) How far will the pilot travel in this direct flight? Assume there is no wind during these flights. 74 CHAPTER 3 Vectors WEB 51. Three vectors are oriented as shown in Figure P3.51, 20.0 units, B 40.0 units, and where A C 30.0 units. Find (a) the x and y components of the resultant vector (expressed in unit vector notation) and (b) the magnitude and direction of the resultant vector. y B A 45.0 O x 45.0 C 200 m y Start 100 m x End 300 m 30 60 150 m Figure P3.57 origin to the location of the object. Suppose that for a certain object the position vector is a function of time, given by P 4i 3j 2t j, where P is in meters and t is in seconds. Evaluate d P/dt. What does this derivative represent about the object? 59. A jet airliner, moving initially at 300 mi/h to the east, suddenly enters a region where the wind is blowing at 100 mi/h in a direction 30.0 north of east. What are the new speed and direction of the aircraft relative to the ground? 60. A pirate has buried his treasure on an island with five trees located at the following points: A(30.0 m, 20.0 m), B(60.0 m, 80.0 m), C( 10.0 m, 10.0 m), D(40.0 m, 30.0 m), and E( 70.0 m, 60.0 m). All points are measured relative to some origin, as in Figure P3.60. Instructions on the map tell you to start at A and move toward B, but to cover only one-half the distance between A and B. Then, move toward C, covering one-third the distance between your current location and C. Next, move toward D, covering one-fourth the distance between where you are and D. Finally, move toward E, covering one-fifth the distance between you and E, stop, and dig. (a) What are the coordinates of the point where the pirate's treasure is buried? (b) ReB E y Figure P3.51 52. If A (6.00i units, and C such that aA 8.00j) units, B ( 8.00i 3.00j) (26.0i 19.0j) units, determine a and b bB C 0. ADDITIONAL PROBLEMS 53. Two vectors A and B have precisely equal magnitudes. For the magnitude of A B to be 100 times greater than the magnitude of A B, what must be the angle between them? 54. Two vectors A and B have precisely equal magnitudes. For the magnitude of A B to be greater than the magnitude of A B by the factor n, what must be the angle between them? 55. A vector is given by R 2.00i 1.00j 3.00k. Find (a) the magnitudes of the x, y, and z components, (b) the magnitude of R, and (c) the angles between R and the x, y, and z axes. 56. Find the sum of these four vector forces: 12.0 N to the right at 35.0 above the horizontal, 31.0 N to the left at 55.0 above the horizontal, 8.40 N to the left at 35.0 below the horizontal, and 24.0 N to the right at 55.0 below the horizontal. (Hint: Make a drawing of this situation and select the best axes for x and y so that you have the least number of components. Then add the vectors, using the component method.) 57. A person going for a walk follows the path shown in Figure P3.57. The total trip consists of four straight-line paths. At the end of the walk, what is the person's resultant displacement measured from the starting point? 58. In general, the instantaneous position of an object is specified by its position vector P leading from a fixed x C A D Figure P3.60 Answers to Quick Quizzes arrange the order of the trees, (for instance, B(30.0 m, 20.0 m), A(60.0 m, 80.0 m), E( 10.0 m, 10.0 m), C(40.0 m, 30.0 m), and D( 70.0 m, 60.0 m), and repeat the calculation to show that the answer does not depend on the order of the trees. 61. A rectangular parallelepiped has dimensions a, b, and c, as in Figure P3.61. (a) Obtain a vector expression for the face diagonal vector R1 . What is the magnitude of this vector? (b) Obtain a vector expression for the body diagonal vector R2 . Note that R1 , ck, and R2 make a right triangle, and prove that the magnitude of R2 is a 2 b 2 c 2. 75 62. A point lying in the xy plane and having coordinates (x, y) can be described by the position vector given by r x i y j. (a) Show that the displacement vector for a particle moving from (x 1 , y 1 ) to (x 2 , y 2 ) is given by d (x 2 x 1 )i (y 2 y 1 )j. (b) Plot the position vectors r1 and r2 and the displacement vector d, and verify by the graphical method that d r2 r1 . 63. A point P is described by the coordinates (x, y) with respect to the normal cartesian coordinate system shown in Figure P3.63. Show that (x , y ), the coordinates of this point in the rotated coordinate system, are related to (x, y) and the rotation angle by the expressions x x cos x sin y y sin y cos P z a y b y x O x R1 R2 c O x y Figure P3.61 Figure P3.63 ANSWERS TO QUICK QUIZZES 3.1 The honeybee needs to communicate to the other honeybees how far it is to the flower and in what direction they must fly. This is exactly the kind of information that polar coordinates convey, as long as the origin of the coordinates is the beehive. 3.2 The resultant has magnitude A B when vector A is oriented in the same direction as vector B. The resultant vector is A B 0 when vector A is oriented in the direction opposite vector B and A B. 3.3 No. In two dimensions, a vector and its components form a right triangle. The vector is the hypotenuse and must be longer than either side. Problem 61 extends this concept to three dimensions. 3.4 No. The magnitude of a vector A is equal to Ay2 Az2. Therefore, if any component is nonzero, A cannot be zero. This generalization of the Pythagorean theorem is left for you to prove in Problem 61. 3.5 The fact that A B 0 tells you that A B. Therefore, the components of the two vectors must have oppoBy , Bx , Ay site signs and equal magnitudes: Ax Bz . and Az Ax2 P U Z Z L E R This airplane is used by NASA for astronaut training. When it flies along a certain curved path, anything inside the plane that is not strapped down begins to float. What causes this strange effect? (NASA) web For more information on microgravity in general and on this airplane, visit http://microgravity.msfc.nasa.gov/ and http://www.jsc.nasa.gov/coop/ kc135/kc135.html c h a p t e r Motion in Two Dimensions Chapter Outline 4.1 The Displacement, Velocity, and Acceleration Vectors 4.2 Two-Dimensional Motion with Constant Acceleration 4.4 Uniform Circular Motion 4.5 Tangential and Radial Acceleration 4.6 Relative Velocity and Relative Acceleration 4.3 Projectile Motion 76 4.1 The Displacement, Velocity, and Acceleration Vectors 77 I n this chapter we deal with the kinematics of a particle moving in two dimensions. Knowing the basics of two-dimensional motion will allow us to examine -- in future chapters -- a wide variety of motions, ranging from the motion of satellites in orbit to the motion of electrons in a uniform electric field. We begin by studying in greater detail the vector nature of displacement, velocity, and acceleration. As in the case of one-dimensional motion, we derive the kinematic equations for two-dimensional motion from the fundamental definitions of these three quantities. We then treat projectile motion and uniform circular motion as special cases of motion in two dimensions. We also discuss the concept of relative motion, which shows why observers in different frames of reference may measure different displacements, velocities, and accelerations for a given particle. y 4.1 THE DISPLACEMENT, VELOCITY, AND ACCELERATION VECTORS O ti ri rf r tf In Chapter 2 we found that the motion of a particle moving along a straight line is completely known if its position is known as a function of time. Now let us extend this idea to motion in the xy plane. We begin by describing the position of a particle by its position vector r, drawn from the origin of some coordinate system to the particle located in the xy plane, as in Figure 4.1. At time ti the particle is at point , and at some later time tf it is at point . The path from to is not necessarily a straight line. As the particle moves from to in the time interval t t f t i , its position vector changes from ri to rf . As we learned in Chapter 2, displacement is a vector, and the displacement of the particle is the difference between its final position and its initial position. We now formally define the displacement vector r for the particle of Figure 4.1 as being the difference between its final position vector and its initial position vector: r rf ri (4.1) The direction of r is indicated in Figure 4.1. As we see from the figure, the magnitude of r is less than the distance traveled along the curved path followed by the particle. As we saw in Chapter 2, it is often useful to quantify motion by looking at the ratio of a displacement divided by the time interval during which that displacement occurred. In two-dimensional (or three-dimensional) kinematics, everything is the same as in one-dimensional kinematics except that we must now use vectors rather than plus and minus signs to indicate the direction of motion. We define the average velocity of a particle during the time interval t as the displacement of the particle divided by that time interval: v r t (4.2) Path of particle x Figure 4.1 A particle moving in the xy plane is located with the position vector r drawn from the origin to the particle. The displacement of the particle as it moves from to in the time interval t t f ti is equal to the vector r rf ri . Displacement vector Average velocity Multiplying or dividing a vector quantity by a scalar quantity changes only the magnitude of the vector, not its direction. Because displacement is a vector quantity and the time interval is a scalar quantity, we conclude that the average velocity is a vector quantity directed along r. Note that the average velocity between points is independent of the path taken. This is because average velocity is proportional to displacement, which depends 78 CHAPTER 4 Motion in Two Dimensions y Direction of v at " ' r3 r2 r1 Figure 4.2 As a particle moves between two points, its average velocity is in the direction of the displacement vector r. As the end point of the path is moved from to to , the respective displacements and corresponding time intervals become smaller and smaller. In the limit that the end point approaches , t approaches zero, and the direction of r approaches that of the line tangent to the curve at . By definition, the instantaneous velocity at is in the direction of this tangent line. x O only on the initial and final position vectors and not on the path taken. As we did with one-dimensional motion, we conclude that if a particle starts its motion at some point and returns to this point via any path, its average velocity is zero for this trip because its displacement is zero. Consider again the motion of a particle between two points in the xy plane, as shown in Figure 4.2. As the time interval over which we observe the motion becomes smaller and smaller, the direction of the displacement approaches that of the line tangent to the path at . The instantaneous velocity v is defined as the limit of the average velocity r/ t as t approaches zero: Instantaneous velocity v lim t:0 r t dr dt (4.3) That is, the instantaneous velocity equals the derivative of the position vector with respect to time. The direction of the instantaneous velocity vector at any point in a particle's path is along a line tangent to the path at that point and in the direction of motion (Fig. 4.3). The magnitude of the instantaneous velocity vector v v is called the speed, which, as you should remember, is a scalar quantity. y vi v vi vf or vi vf v ri rf vf O x Figure 4.3 A particle moves from position to position . Its velocity vector changes from vi to vf . The vector diagrams at the upper right show two ways of determining the vector v from the initial and final velocities. 4.2 Two-Dimensional Motion with Constant Acceleration 79 As a particle moves from one point to another along some path, its instantaneous velocity vector changes from vi at time ti to vf at time tf . Knowing the velocity at these points allows us to determine the average acceleration of the particle: The average acceleration of a particle as it moves from one position to another is defined as the change in the instantaneous velocity vector v divided by the time t during which that change occurred: a vf tf vi ti v t (4.4) Average acceleration Because it is the ratio of a vector quantity v and a scalar quantity t, we conclude that average acceleration a is a vector quantity directed along v. As indicated in Figure 4.3, the direction of v is found by adding the vector vi (the negative of vi ) to the vector vf , because by definition v vf vi . When the average acceleration of a particle changes during different time intervals, it is useful to define its instantaneous acceleration a: The instantaneous acceleration a is defined as the limiting value of the ratio v/ t as t approaches zero: a lim t:0 v t dv dt (4.5) Instantaneous acceleration 3.5 In other words, the instantaneous acceleration equals the derivative of the velocity vector with respect to time. It is important to recognize that various changes can occur when a particle accelerates. First, the magnitude of the velocity vector (the speed) may change with time as in straight-line (one-dimensional) motion. Second, the direction of the velocity vector may change with time even if its magnitude (speed) remains constant, as in curved-path (two-dimensional) motion. Finally, both the magnitude and the direction of the velocity vector may change simultaneously. Quick Quiz 4.1 The gas pedal in an automobile is called the accelerator. (a) Are there any other controls in an automobile that can be considered accelerators? (b) When is the gas pedal not an accelerator? 4.2 TWO-DIMENSIONAL MOTION WITH CONSTANT ACCELERATION Let us consider two-dimensional motion during which the acceleration remains constant in both magnitude and direction. The position vector for a particle moving in the xy plane can be written r xi yj (4.6) where x, y, and r change with time as the particle moves while i and j remain constant. If the position vector is known, the velocity of the particle can be obtained from Equations 4.3 and 4.6, which give v vxi vy j (4.7) 80 CHAPTER 4 Motion in Two Dimensions Because a is assumed constant, its components ax and ay also are constants. Therefore, we can apply the equations of kinematics to the x and y components of the velocity vector. Substituting vx f vxi a x t and vy f vyi a y t into Equation 4.7 to determine the final velocity at any time t, we obtain vf Velocity vector as a function of time vf (v xi a x t)i (v yi a y t)j (v xi i v yi j) (a x i a y j)t vi at (4.8) This result states that the velocity of a particle at some time t equals the vector sum of its initial velocity vi and the additional velocity at acquired in the time t as a result of constant acceleration. Similarly, from Equation 2.11 we know that the x and y coordinates of a particle moving with constant acceleration are xf xi v xit 1 2 2 a xt yf yi v yit 1 2 2 a yt Position vector as a function of time Substituting these expressions into Equation 4.6 (and labeling the final position vector rf ) gives rf (x i v xit 1a xt 2)i (y i v yit 1a yt 2)j 2 2 (x i i y i j) (v xi i v yi j)t 1(a x i a y j)t 2 2 (4.9) rf ri vit 1at 2 2 This equation tells us that the displacement vector r rf ri is the vector sum of a displacement vi t arising from the initial velocity of the particle and a displacement 1at 2 resulting from the uniform acceleration of the particle. 2 Graphical representations of Equations 4.8 and 4.9 are shown in Figure 4.4. For simplicity in drawing the figure, we have taken ri 0 in Figure 4.4a. That is, we assume the particle is at the origin at t t i 0. Note from Figure 4.4a that rf is generally not along the direction of either vi or a because the relationship between these quantities is a vector expression. For the same reason, from Figure 4.4b we see that vf is generally not along the direction of vi or a. Finally, note that vf and rf are generally not in the same direction. y y ayt 1 a t2 2 y vf yf rf vyf 1 at 2 2 at vyi vyit vit vxit xf (a) (b) 1 a t2 2 x vi x vxi axt x vxf Figure 4.4 Vector representations and components of (a) the displacement and (b) the velocity of a particle moving with a uniform acceleration a. To simplify the drawing, we have set ri 0. 4.2 Two-Dimensional Motion with Constant Acceleration 81 Because Equations 4.8 and 4.9 are vector expressions, we may write them in component form: vf rf vi ri at vit 1 2 2 at v xf v yf xf yf v xi v yi xi yi a xt a yt v xit v yit 1a t 2 2 x 1 2 2 a yt (4.8a) (4.9a) These components are illustrated in Figure 4.4. The component form of the equations for vf and rf show us that two-dimensional motion at constant acceleration is equivalent to two independent motions -- one in the x direction and one in the y direction -- having constant accelerations ax and ay . EXAMPLE 4.1 Motion in a Plane We could also obtain this result using Equation 4.8 directly, noting that a 4.0i m/s2 and vi (20i 15j) m/s. According to this result, the x component of velocity increases while the y component remains constant; this is consistent with what we predicted. After a long time, the x component will be so great that the y component will be negligible. If we were to extend the object's path in Figure 4.5, eventually it would become nearly parallel to the x axis. It is always helpful to make comparisons between final answers and initial stated conditions. (b) Calculate the velocity and speed of the particle at t 5.0 s. A particle starts from the origin at t 0 with an initial velocity having an x component of 20 m/s and a y component of 15 m/s. The particle moves in the xy plane with an x component of acceleration only, given by ax 4.0 m/s2. (a) Determine the components of the velocity vector at any time and the total velocity vector at any time. Solution After carefully reading the problem, we realize we can set vxi 20 m/s, vyi 15 m/s, ax 4.0 m/s2, and ay 0. This allows us to sketch a rough motion diagram of the situation. The x component of velocity starts at 20 m/s and increases by 4.0 m/s every second. The y component of velocity never changes from its initial value of 15 m/s. From this information we sketch some velocity vectors as shown in Figure 4.5. Note that the spacing between successive images increases as time goes on because the velocity is increasing. The equations of kinematics give vxf vyf Therefore, vf vxf i v yf j [(20 4.0t)i 15j] m/s v xi v yi a xt a yt (20 4.0t) m/s 0 15 m/s 15 m/s Solution vf {[20 With t 5.0 s, the result from part (a) gives 15j} m/s (40i 15j) m/s 4.0(5.0)]i This result tells us that at t 5.0 s, vxf 40 m/s and vyf 15 m/s. Knowing these two components for this twodimensional motion, we can find both the direction and the magnitude of the velocity vector. To determine the angle that v makes with the x axis at t 5.0 s, we use the fact that tan vyf /vxf : tan x 1 v yf vxf y tan 1 15 m/s 40 m/s 21 where the minus sign indicates an angle of 21 below the positive x axis. The speed is the magnitude of vf : vf vf vx f 2 vyf 2 (40)2 ( 15)2 m/s 43 m/s In looking over our result, we notice that if we calculate vi from the x and y components of vi , we find that v f v i . Does this make sense? Figure 4.5 Motion diagram for the particle. (c) Determine the x and y coordinates of the particle at any time t and the position vector at this time. 82 CHAPTER 4 Because x i v xit v yit 1 2 2 a xt Motion in Two Dimensions (Alternatively, we could obtain rf by applying Equation 4.9 directly, with vi (20i 15j) m/s and a 4.0i m/s2. Try it!) Thus, for example, at t 5.0 s, x 150 m, y 75 m, and rf (150i 75j) m. The magnitude of the displacement of the particle from the origin at t 5.0 s is the magnitude of rf at this time: rf rf Solution xf yf yi 0 at t (20t 0, Equation 2.11 gives 2.0t 2) m ( 15t) m Therefore, the position vector at any time t is rf xf i yf j [(20t 2.0t 2)i 15t j] m (150)2 ( 75)2 m 170 m Note that this is not the distance that the particle travels in this time! Can you determine this distance from the available data? 4.3 PROJECTILE MOTION Assumptions of projectile motion Anyone who has observed a baseball in motion (or, for that matter, any other object thrown into the air) has observed projectile motion. The ball moves in a curved path, and its motion is simple to analyze if we make two assumptions: (1) the free-fall acceleration g is constant over the range of motion and is directed downward,1 and (2) the effect of air resistance is negligible.2 With these assumptions, we find that the path of a projectile, which we call its trajectory, is always a parabola. We use these assumptions throughout this chapter. To show that the trajectory of a projectile is a parabola, let us choose our reference frame such that the y direction is vertical and positive is upward. Because air g (as in one-dimensional free fall) resistance is neglected, we know that a y and that a x 0. Furthermore, let us assume that at t 0, the projectile leaves the origin (x i y i 0) with speed vi , as shown in Figure 4.6. The vector vi makes an angle i with the horizontal, where i is the angle at which the projectile leaves the origin. From the definitions of the cosine and sine functions we have 3.5 cos i v xi /v i sin i v yi /v i Therefore, the initial x and y components of velocity are v xi v i cos i v yi v i sin i Horizontal position component Substituting the x component into Equation 4.9a with xi that x f v xit (v i cos i)t Repeating with the y component and using yi 0 and ay 1 2 2 gt 1 2 2 a yt 0 and ax 0, we find (4.10) g, we obtain (4.11) Vertical position component yf v yit (v i sin i)t i) Next, we solve Equation 4.10 for t for t into Equation 4.11; this gives y 1 xf /(vi cos g and substitute this expression (tan i)x 2v i cos2 2 x2 i (4.12) This assumption is reasonable as long as the range of motion is small compared with the radius of the Earth (6.4 106 m). In effect, this assumption is equivalent to assuming that the Earth is flat over the range of motion considered. 2 This assumption is generally not justified, especially at high velocities. In addition, any spin imparted to a projectile, such as that applied when a pitcher throws a curve ball, can give rise to some very interesting effects associated with aerodynamic forces, which will be discussed in Chapter 15. 4.3 Projectile Motion 83 y vy vi vyi v vy = 0 vx i g vx i vx i vy v i vxi vx i x i vyi v Figure 4.6 The parabolic path of a projectile that leaves the origin with a velocity vi . The velocity vector v changes with time in both magnitude and direction. This change is the result of acceleration in the negative y direction. The x component of velocity remains constant in time because there is no acceleration along the horizontal direction. The y component of velocity is zero at the peak of the path. A welder cuts holes through a heavy metal construction beam with a hot torch. The sparks generated in the process follow parabolic paths. This equation is valid for launch angles in the range 0 /2. We have left i the subscripts off the x and y because the equation is valid for any point (x, y) along the path of the projectile. The equation is of the form y ax bx 2, which is the equation of a parabola that passes through the origin. Thus, we have shown that the trajectory of a projectile is a parabola. Note that the trajectory is completely specified if both the initial speed vi and the launch angle i are known. The vector expression for the position vector of the projectile as a function of time follows directly from Equation 4.9, with ri 0 and a g: r vit 1 2 2 gt QuickLab Place two tennis balls at the edge of a tabletop. Sharply snap one ball horizontally off the table with one hand while gently tapping the second ball off with your other hand. Compare how long it takes the two to reach the floor. Explain your results. This expression is plotted in Figure 4.7. y 1 2 gt 2 vit r (x, y) O x Figure 4.7 The position vector r of a projectile whose initial velocity at the origin is vi . The vector vi t would be the displacement of the projectile if gravity were absent, and the vector 1 gt 2 is its 2 vertical displacement due to its downward gravitational acceleration. 84 CHAPTER 4 Motion in Two Dimensions Multiflash exposure of a tennis player executing a forehand swing. Note that the ball follows a parabolic path characteristic of a projectile. Such photographs can be used to study the quality of sports equipment and the performance of an athlete. It is interesting to realize that the motion of a particle can be considered the superposition of the term vi t, the displacement if no acceleration were present, and the term 1 gt 2, which arises from the acceleration due to gravity. In other 2 words, if there were no gravitational acceleration, the particle would continue to move along a straight path in the direction of vi . Therefore, the vertical distance 1 2 2 gt through which the particle "falls" off the straight-line path is the same distance that a freely falling body would fall during the same time interval. We conclude that projectile motion is the superposition of two motions: (1) constant-velocity motion in the horizontal direction and (2) free-fall motion in the vertical direction. Except for t, the time of flight, the horizontal and vertical components of a projectile's motion are completely independent of each other. EXAMPLE 4.2 Approximating Projectile Motion A ball is thrown in such a way that its initial vertical and horizontal components of velocity are 40 m/s and 20 m/s, respectively. Estimate the total time of flight and the distance the ball is from its starting point when it lands. Solution We start by remembering that the two velocity components are independent of each other. By considering the vertical motion first, we can determine how long the ball remains in the air. Then, we can use the time of flight to estimate the horizontal distance covered. A motion diagram like Figure 4.8 helps us organize what we know about the problem. The acceleration vectors are all the same, pointing downward with a magnitude of nearly 10 m/s2. The velocity vectors change direction. Their hori- Figure 4.8 Motion diagram for a projectile. 4.3 zontal components are all the same: 20 m/s. Because the vertical motion is free fall, the vertical components of the velocity vectors change, second by second, from 40 m/s to roughly 30, 20, and 10 m/s in the upward direction, and then to 0 m/s. Subsequently, its velocity becomes 10, 20, 30, and 40 m/s in the downward direction. Thus it takes the ball Projectile Motion 85 about 4 s to go up and another 4 s to come back down, for a total time of flight of approximately 8 s. Because the horizontal component of velocity is 20 m/s, and because the ball travels at this speed for 8 s, it ends up approximately 160 m from its starting point. Horizontal Range and Maximum Height of a Projectile Let us assume that a projectile is fired from the origin at ti 0 with a positive vyi component, as shown in Figure 4.9. Two points are especially interesting to analyze: the peak point , which has cartesian coordinates (R/2, h), and the point , which has coordinates (R, 0). The distance R is called the horizontal range of the projectile, and the distance h is its maximum height. Let us find h and R in terms of vi , i , and g. We can determine h by noting that at the peak, vy A 0. Therefore, we can use Equation 4.8a to determine the time t A it takes the projectile to reach the peak: vyf 0 tA v yi v i sin v i sin g a yt i i y vy A = 0 vi h i O x R gt A Substituting this expression for t A into the y part of Equation 4.9a and replacing y f y A with h, we obtain an expression for h in terms of the magnitude and direction of the initial velocity vector: h h (v i sin i) v i2 sin2 2g i Figure 4.9 A projectile fired from the origin at ti 0 with an initial velocity vi . The maximum height of the projectile is h, and the horizontal range is R. At , the peak of the trajectory, the particle has coordinates (R/2, h). v i sin g i 1 2g v i sin g i 2 (4.13) Maximum height of projectile The range R is the horizontal distance that the projectile travels in twice the time it takes to reach its peak, that is, in a time t B 2t A . Using the x part of Equation 4.9a, noting that vxi vx B vi cos i , and setting R x B at t 2t A , we find that R v xit B (v i cos i)2t A 2v i sin g cos i (v i cos i) Using the identity sin 2 more compact form 2 sin 2v i2 sin i cos g i (see Appendix B.4), we write R in the i R v i2 sin 2 g (4.14) Range of projectile Keep in mind that Equations 4.13 and 4.14 are useful for calculating h and R only if vi and i are known (which means that only vi has to be specified) and if the projectile lands at the same height from which it started, as it does in Figure 4.9. The maximum value of R from Equation 4.14 is R max v i2/g. This result follows from the fact that the maximum value of sin 2 i is 1, which occurs when 2 i 90. Therefore, R is a maximum when i 45. 86 CHAPTER 4 Motion in Two Dimensions y(m) 150 vi = 50 m/s 75 100 60 45 50 30 15 x(m) 50 100 150 200 250 Figure 4.10 A projectile fired from the origin with an initial speed of 50 m/s at various angles of projection. Note that complementary values of i result in the same value of x (range of the projectile). QuickLab To carry out this investigation, you need to be outdoors with a small ball, such as a tennis ball, as well as a wristwatch. Throw the ball straight up as hard as you can and determine the initial speed of your throw and the approximate maximum height of the ball, using only your watch. What happens when you throw the ball at some angle 90? Does this change the time of flight (perhaps because it is easier to throw)? Can you still determine the maximum height and initial speed? Figure 4.10 illustrates various trajectories for a projectile having a given initial speed but launched at different angles. As you can see, the range is a maximum for i 45. In addition, for any i other than 45, a point having cartesian coordinates (R, 0) can be reached by using either one of two complementary values of i , such as 75 and 15. Of course, the maximum height and time of flight for one of these values of i are different from the maximum height and time of flight for the complementary value. Quick Quiz 4.2 As a projectile moves in its parabolic path, is there any point along the path where the velocity and acceleration vectors are (a) perpendicular to each other? (b) parallel to each other? (c) Rank the five paths in Figure 4.10 with respect to time of flight, from the shortest to the longest. Problem-Solving Hints Projectile Motion We suggest that you use the following approach to solving projectile motion problems: Select a coordinate system and resolve the initial velocity vector into x and y components. Follow the techniques for solving constant-velocity problems to analyze the horizontal motion. Follow the techniques for solving constant-acceleration problems to analyze the vertical motion. The x and y motions share the same time of flight t. 4.3 Projectile Motion 87 EXAMPLE 4.3 The Long-Jump takeoff point and label the peak as and the landing point as . The horizontal motion is described by Equation 4.10: xf xB (v i cos i)t B A long-jumper leaves the ground at an angle of 20.0 above the horizontal and at a speed of 11.0 m/s. (a) How far does he jump in the horizontal direction? (Assume his motion is equivalent to that of a particle.) Because the initial speed and launch angle are given, the most direct way of solving this problem is to use the range formula given by Equation 4.14. However, it is more instructive to take a more general approach and use Figure 4.9. As before, we set our origin of coordinates at the (11.0 m/s)(cos 20.0)t B Solution The value of x B can be found if the total time of the jump is known. We are able to find t B by remembering that g and by using the y part of Equation 4.8a. We also ay note that at the top of the jump the vertical component of velocity vy A is zero: vy f 0 tA vyA v i sin i gt A (9.80 m/s2)t A (11.0 m/s) sin 20.0 0.384 s This is the time needed to reach the top of the jump. Because of the symmetry of the vertical motion, an identical time interval passes before the jumper returns to the ground. Therefore, the total time in the air is t B 2t A 0.768 s. Substituting this value into the above expression for xf gives xf xB (11.0 m/s)(cos 20.0)(0.768 s) 7.94 m This is a reasonable distance for a world-class athlete. (b) What is the maximum height reached? Solution We find the maximum height reached by using Equation 4.11: y max yA (v i sin i)t A 1 2 2 gt A (11.0 m/s)(sin 20.0)(0.384 s) 1 2 (9.80 m/s2)(0.384 s)2 0.722 m Treating the long-jumper as a particle is an oversimplification. Nevertheless, the values obtained are reasonable. In a long-jump event, 1993 United States champion Mike Powell can leap horizontal distances of at least 8 m. Exercise To check these calculations, use Equations 4.13 and 4.14 to find the maximum height and horizontal range. EXAMPLE 4.4 A Bull's-Eye Every Time tion a y g. First, note from Figure 4.11b that the initial y coordinate of the target is x T tan i and that it falls through a 1 distance 2gt 2 in a time t. Therefore, the y coordinate of the target at any moment after release is yT x T tan i 1 2 2 gt In a popular lecture demonstration, a projectile is fired at a target in such a way that the projectile leaves the gun at the same time the target is dropped from rest, as shown in Figure 4.11. Show that if the gun is initially aimed at the stationary target, the projectile hits the target. We can argue that a collision results under the conditions stated by noting that, as soon as they are released, the projectile and the target experience the same accelera- Solution Now if we use Equation 4.9a to write an expression for the y coordinate of the projectile at any moment, we obtain yP x P tan i 1 2 2 gt 88 CHAPTER 4 Motion in Two Dimensions y Target s of igh t 1 2 vi L e in gt 2 x T tan i 0 Gun (a) i xT Point of collision yT x (b) Figure 4.11 (a) Multiflash photograph of projectile target demonstration. If the gun is aimed directly at the target and is fired at the same instant the target begins to fall, the projectile will hit the target. Note that the velocity of the projectile (red arrows) changes in direction and magnitude, while the downward acceleration (violet arrows) remains constant. (Central Scientific Company.) (b) Schematic diagram of the projectile target demonstration. Both projectile and target fall through the same vertical distance in a time t because both experience the same g. acceleration a y Thus, by comparing the two previous equations, we see that when the y coordinates of the projectile and target are the same, their x coordinates are the same and a collision results. That is, when y P y T , x P x T . You can obtain the same result, using expressions for the position vectors for the projectile and target. Note that a collision will not always take place owing to a further restriction: A collision can result only when vi sin i gd/2, where d is the initial elevation of the target above the floor. If vi sin i is less than this value, the projectile will strike the floor before reaching the target. EXAMPLE 4.5 That's Quite an Arm! y (0, 0) v i = 20.0 m/s x A stone is thrown from the top of a building upward at an angle of 30.0 to the horizontal and with an initial speed of 20.0 m/s, as shown in Figure 4.12. If the height of the building is 45.0 m, (a) how long is it before the stone hits the ground? i = 30.0 Solution We have indicated the various parameters in Figure 4.12. When working problems on your own, you should always make a sketch such as this and label it. The initial x and y components of the stone's velocity are vxi vyi vi cos vi sin i i (20.0 m/s)(cos 30.0) (20.0 m/s)(sin 30.0) 17.3 m/s 10.0 m/s 45.0 m To find t, we can use y f vyi t 1a yt 2 (Eq. 4.9a) with 2 yf 45.0 m, a y g, and vyi 10.0 m/s (there is a minus sign on the numerical value of yf because we have chosen the top of the building as the origin): 45.0 m (10.0 m/s)t 1 2 (9.80 m/s2)t 2 xf xf = ? y f = 45.0 m Solving the quadratic equation for t gives, for the positive root, t 4.22 s. Does the negative root have any physical Figure 4.12 4.3 meaning? (Can you think of another way of finding t from the information given?) (b) What is the speed of the stone just before it strikes the ground? vyf Projectile Motion 10.0 m/s (9.80 m/s2)(4.22 s) 31.4 m/s 89 The negative sign indicates that the stone is moving downward. Because vx f vxi 17.3 m/s, the required speed is vf vx f 2 vy f 2 (17.3)2 ( 31.4)2 m/s 35.9 m/s Solution We can use Equation 4.8a, v y f v yi a y t , with t 4.22 s to obtain the y component of the velocity just before the stone strikes the ground: Exercise Answer Where does the stone strike the ground? 73.0 m from the base of the building. EXAMPLE 4.6 The Stranded Explorers velocity is the same as that of the plane when the package is released: 40.0 m/s. Thus, we have xf (40.0 m/s)t An Alaskan rescue plane drops a package of emergency rations to a stranded party of explorers, as shown in Figure 4.13. If the plane is traveling horizontally at 40.0 m/s and is 100 m above the ground, where does the package strike the ground relative to the point at which it was released? Solution For this problem we choose the coordinate system shown in Figure 4.13, in which the origin is at the point of release of the package. Consider first the horizontal motion of the package. The only equation available to us for finding the distance traveled along the horizontal direction is x f v xi t (Eq. 4.9a). The initial x component of the package y 40.0 m/s x If we know t, the length of time the package is in the air, then we can determine xf , the distance the package travels in the horizontal direction. To find t, we use the equations that describe the vertical motion of the package. We know that at the instant the package hits the ground, its y coordinate is yf 100 m. We also know that the initial vertical component of the package velocity vyi is zero because at the moment of release, the package had only a horizontal component of velocity. From Equation 4.9a, we have yf 100 m t 1 2 2 gt 1 2 (9.80 m/s2)t 2 4.52 s Substitution of this value for the time of flight into the equation for the x coordinate gives xf 100 m (40.0 m/s)(4.52 s) 181 m The package hits the ground 181 m to the right of the drop point. Exercise Answer Exercise What are the horizontal and vertical components of the velocity of the package just before it hits the ground? vxf 40.0 m/s; vy f 44.3 m/s. Where is the plane when the package hits the ground? (Assume that the plane does not change its speed or course.) Directly over the package. Figure 4.13 Answer 90 CHAPTER 4 Motion in Two Dimensions EXAMPLE 4.7 The End of the Ski Jump d cos 35.0 and y f d sin 35.0. Substituting these relationships into (1) and (2), we obtain (3) (4) d cos 35.0 d sin 35.0 (25.0 m/s)t 1 2 (9.80 A ski jumper leaves the ski track moving in the horizontal direction with a speed of 25.0 m/s, as shown in Figure 4.14. The landing incline below him falls off with a slope of 35.0. Where does he land on the incline? m/s2)t 2 Solution It is reasonable to expect the skier to be airborne for less than 10 s, and so he will not go farther than 250 m horizontally. We should expect the value of d, the distance traveled along the incline, to be of the same order of magnitude. It is convenient to select the beginning of the jump as the origin (x i 0, y i 0). Because v xi 25.0 m/s and v yi 0, the x and y component forms of Equation 4.9a are (1) (2) xf yf v xi t 1 2 2a y t Solving (3) for t and substituting the result into (4), we find that d 109 m. Hence, the x and y coordinates of the point at which he lands are xf yf d cos 35.0 d sin 35.0 (109 m) cos 35.0 (109 m) sin 35.0 89.3 m 62.5 m (25.0 m/s)t 1 2 (9.80 m/s2)t 2 Exercise Answer Determine how long the jumper is airborne and his vertical component of velocity just before he lands. 3.57 s; 35.0 m/s. From the right triangle in Figure 4.14, we see that the jumper's x and y coordinates at the landing point are x f 25.0 m/s (0, 0) = 35.0 y d x Figure 4.14 What would have occurred if the skier in the last example happened to be carrying a stone and let go of it while in midair? Because the stone has the same initial velocity as the skier, it will stay near him as he moves -- that is, it floats alongside him. This is a technique that NASA uses to train astronauts. The plane pictured at the beginning of the chapter flies in the same type of projectile path that the skier and stone follow. The passengers and cargo in the plane fall along- 4.4 Uniform Circular Motion 91 QuickLab Armed with nothing but a ruler and the knowledge that the time between images was 1/30 s, find the horizontal speed of the yellow ball in Figure 4.15. (Hint: Start by analyzing the motion of the red ball. Because you know its vertical acceleration, you can calibrate the distances depicted in the photograph. Then you can find the horizontal speed of the yellow ball.) Figure 4.15 This multiflash photograph of two balls released simultaneously illustrates both free fall (red ball) and projectile motion (yellow ball). The yellow ball was projected horizontally, while the red ball was released from rest. (Richard Megna/Fundamental Pho- tographs) side each other; that is, they have the same trajectory. An astronaut can release a piece of equipment and it will float freely alongside her hand. The same thing happens in the space shuttle. The craft and everything in it are falling as they orbit the Earth. 4.4 3.6 UNIFORM CIRCULAR MOTION Figure 4.16a shows a car moving in a circular path with constant linear speed v. Such motion is called uniform circular motion. Because the car's direction of motion changes, the car has an acceleration, as we learned in Section 4.1. For any motion, the velocity vector is tangent to the path. Consequently, when an object moves in a circular path, its velocity vector is perpendicular to the radius of the circle. We now show that the acceleration vector in uniform circular motion is always perpendicular to the path and always points toward the center of the circle. An acvi r v r O O (a) (b) (c) r r vf vi vf v Figure 4.16 (a) A car moving along a circular path at constant speed experiences uniform circular motion. (b) As a particle moves from to , its velocity vector changes from vi to vf . (c) The construction for determining the direction of the change in velocity v, which is toward the center of the circle for small r. 92 CHAPTER 4 Motion in Two Dimensions celeration of this nature is called a centripetal (center-seeking) acceleration, and its magnitude is ar v2 r (4.15) where r is the radius of the circle and the notation ar is used to indicate that the centripetal acceleration is along the radial direction. To derive Equation 4.15, consider Figure 4.16b, which shows a particle first at point and then at point . The particle is at at time ti , and its velocity at that time is vi . It is at at some later time tf , and its velocity at that time is vf . Let us assume here that vi and vf differ only in direction; their magnitudes (speeds) are the same (that is, v i v f v). To calculate the acceleration of the particle, let us begin with the defining equation for average acceleration (Eq. 4.4): a vf tf vi ti v t This equation indicates that we must subtract vi from vf , being sure to treat them as vectors, where v vf vi is the change in the velocity. Because vi v vf , we can find the vector v, using the vector triangle in Figure 4.16c. Now consider the triangle in Figure 4.16b, which has sides r and r. This triangle and the one in Figure 4.16c, which has sides v and v, are similar. This fact enables us to write a relationship between the lengths of the sides: v v r r This equation can be solved for v and the expression so obtained substituted into a v/ t (Eq. 4.4) to give a v r r t Now imagine that points and in Figure 4.16b are extremely close together. In this case v points toward the center of the circular path, and because the acceleration is in the direction of v, it too points toward the center. Furthermore, as and approach each other, t approaches zero, and the ratio r/ t approaches the speed v. Hence, in the limit t : 0, the magnitude of the acceleration is ar v2 r Thus, we conclude that in uniform circular motion, the acceleration is directed toward the center of the circle and has a magnitude given by v 2/r, where v is the speed of the particle and r is the radius of the circle. You should be able to show that the dimensions of a r are L/T 2. We shall return to the discussion of circular motion in Section 6.1. 4.5 3.6 TANGENTIAL AND RADIAL ACCELERATION Now let us consider a particle moving along a curved path where the velocity changes both in direction and in magnitude, as shown in Figure 4.17. As is always the case, the velocity vector is tangent to the path, but now the direction of the ac- 4.5 Tangential and Radial Acceleration 93 Path of particle ar ar a at at a ar at a Figure 4.17 The motion of a particle along an arbitrary curved path lying in the xy plane. If the velocity vector v (always tangent to the path) changes in direction and magnitude, the component vectors of the acceleration a are a tangential component a t and a radial component ar . celeration vector a changes from point to point. This vector can be resolved into two component vectors: a radial component vector ar and a tangential component vector at . Thus, a can be written as the vector sum of these component vectors: a ar at (4.16) Total acceleration The tangential acceleration causes the change in the speed of the particle. It is parallel to the instantaneous velocity, and its magnitude is at d v dt (4.17) Tangential acceleration The radial acceleration arises from the change in direction of the velocity vector as described earlier and has an absolute magnitude given by ar v2 r (4.18) Radial acceleration where r is the radius of curvature of the path at the point in question. Because ar and at are mutually perpendicular component vectors of a, it follows that a a r2 a t2 . As in the case of uniform circular motion, ar in nonuniform circular motion always points toward the center of curvature, as shown in Figure 4.17. Also, at a given speed, ar is large when the radius of curvature is small (as at points and in Figure 4.17) and small when r is large (such as at point ). The direction of at is either in the same direction as v (if v is increasing) or opposite v (if v is decreasing). In uniform circular motion, where v is constant, at 0 and the acceleration is always completely radial, as we described in Section 4.4. (Note: Eq. 4.18 is identical to Eq. 4.15.) In other words, uniform circular motion is a special case of motion along a curved path. Furthermore, if the direction of v does not change, then there is no radial acceleration and the motion is one-dimensional (in this case, ar 0, but at may not be zero). Quick Quiz 4.3 (a) Draw a motion diagram showing velocity and acceleration vectors for an object moving with constant speed counterclockwise around a circle. Draw similar diagrams for an object moving counterclockwise around a circle but (b) slowing down at constant tangential acceleration and (c) speeding up at constant tangential acceleration. It is convenient to write the acceleration of a particle moving in a circular path in terms of unit vectors. We do this by defining the unit vectors ^ and ^ shown in r 94 CHAPTER 4 Motion in Two Dimensions y a = ar + at ^ ^ r r a ar at O x O (a) (b) ^ Figure 4.18 (a) Descriptions of the unit vectors r and ^. (b) The total acceleration a of a particle moving along a curved path (which at any instant is part of a circle of radius r) is the sum of radial and tangential components. The radial component is directed toward the center of curvature. If the tangential component of acceleration becomes zero, the particle follows uniform circular motion. r Figure 4.18a, where ^ is a unit vector lying along the radius vector and directed radially outward from the center of the circle and ^ is a unit vector tangent to the circle. The direction of ^ is in the direction of increasing , where is measured r counterclockwise from the positive x axis. Note that both ^ and ^ "move along with the particle" and so vary in time. Using this notation, we can express the total acceleration as a at ar d v dt ^ v2 ^ r r (4.19) These vectors are described in Figure 4.18b. The negative sign on the v 2/r term in Equation 4.19 indicates that the radial acceleration is always directed radially inr ward, opposite ^. Quick Quiz 4.4 Based on your experience, draw a motion diagram showing the position, velocity, and acceleration vectors for a pendulum that, from an initial position 45 to the right of a central vertical line, swings in an arc that carries it to a final position 45 to the left of the central vertical line. The arc is part of a circle, and you should use the center of this circle as the origin for the position vectors. EXAMPLE 4.8 The Swinging Ball ure 4.19 lets us take a closer look at the situation. The radial acceleration is given by Equation 4.18. With v 1.5 m/s and r 0.50 m, we find that ar v2 r (1.5 m/s)2 0.50 m 4.5 m/s2 A ball tied to the end of a string 0.50 m in length swings in a vertical circle under the influence of gravity, as shown in Fig20 with the ure 4.19. When the string makes an angle vertical, the ball has a speed of 1.5 m/s. (a) Find the magnitude of the radial component of acceleration at this instant. Solution The diagram from the answer to Quick Quiz 4.4 (p. 109) applies to this situation, and so we have a good idea of how the acceleration vector varies during the motion. Fig- (b) What is the magnitude of the tangential acceleration when 20? 4.6 Relative Velocity and Relative Acceleration 95 When the ball is at an angle to the vertical, it has a tangential acceleration of magnitude g sin (the component of g tangent to the circle). Therefore, at 20, at g sin 20 3.4 m/s2. Solution horizontal positions ( 90 and 270), a t g and ar has a value between its minimum and maximum values. (c) Find the magnitude and direction of the total acceleration a at 20. Solution 20 is a If Because a ar at , the magnitude of a at r g v 0 a r2 a t2 (4.5)2 (3.4)2 m/s2 5.6 m/s2 is the angle between a and the string, then tan 1 at ar tan 1 3.4 m/s2 4.5 m/s2 ar 37 a Note that a, at , and ar all change in direction and magnitude as the ball swings through the circle. When the ball is at its lowest elevation ( 0), at 0 because there is no tangential component of g at this angle; also, ar is a maximum because v is a maximum. If the ball has enough speed to reach its highest position ( 180), then at is again zero but ar is a minimum because v is now a minimum. Finally, in the two at Figure 4.19 Motion of a ball suspended by a string of length r. The ball swings with nonuniform circular motion in a vertical plane, and its acceleration a has a radial component a r and a tangential component a t . 4.6 RELATIVE VELOCITY AND RELATIVE ACCELERATION 3.7 In this section, we describe how observations made by different observers in different frames of reference are related to each other. We find that observers in different frames of reference may measure different displacements, velocities, and accelerations for a given particle. That is, two observers moving relative to each other generally do not agree on the outcome of a measurement. For example, suppose two cars are moving in the same direction with speeds of 50 mi/h and 60 mi/h. To a passenger in the slower car, the speed of the faster car is 10 mi/h. Of course, a stationary observer will measure the speed of the faster car to be 60 mi/h, not 10 mi/h. Which observer is correct? They both are! This simple example demonstrates that the velocity of an object depends on the frame of reference in which it is measured. Suppose a person riding on a skateboard (observer A) throws a ball in such a way that it appears in this person's frame of reference to move first straight upward and then straight downward along the same vertical line, as shown in Figure 4.20a. A stationary observer B sees the path of the ball as a parabola, as illustrated in Figure 4.20b. Relative to observer B, the ball has a vertical component of velocity (resulting from the initial upward velocity and the downward acceleration of gravity) and a horizontal component. Another example of this concept that of is a package dropped from an airplane flying with a constant velocity; this is the situation we studied in Example 4.6. An observer on the airplane sees the motion of the package as a straight line toward the Earth. The stranded explorer on the ground, however, sees the trajectory of the package as a parabola. If, once it drops the package, the airplane con- 96 Path seen by observer A A CHAPTER 4 Motion in Two Dimensions Path seen by observer B A B (a) (b) Figure 4.20 (a) Observer A on a moving vehicle throws a ball upward and sees it rise and fall in a straight-line path. (b) Stationary observer B sees a parabolic path for the same ball. tinues to move horizontally with the same velocity, then the package hits the ground directly beneath the airplane (if we assume that air resistance is neglected)! In a more general situation, consider a particle located at point in Figure 4.21. Imagine that the motion of this particle is being described by two observers, one in reference frame S, fixed relative to the Earth, and another in reference frame S , moving to the right relative to S (and therefore relative to the Earth) with a constant velocity v0 . (Relative to an observer in S , S moves to the left with a velocity v0 .) Where an observer stands in a reference frame is irrelevant in this discussion, but for purposes of this discussion let us place each observer at her or his respective origin. We label the position of the particle relative to the S frame with the position vector r and that relative to the S frame with the position vector r , both after some time t. The vectors r and r are related to each other through the expression r r v0t, or Galilean coordinate transformation r r v0t (4.20) S S r r Figure 4.21 O v0t O v0 A particle located at is described by two observers, one in the fixed frame of reference S, and the other in the frame S , which moves to the right with a constant velocity v0 . The vector r is the particle's position vector relative to S, and r is its position vector relative to S . 4.6 Relative Velocity and Relative Acceleration 97 The woman standing on the beltway sees the walking man pass by at a slower speed than the woman standing on the stationary floor does. That is, after a time t, the S frame is displaced to the right of the S frame by an amount v0t. If we differentiate Equation 4.20 with respect to time and note that v0 is constant, we obtain dr dr v0 dt dt v v v0 (4.21) Galilean velocity transformation where v is the velocity of the particle observed in the S frame and v is its velocity observed in the S frame. Equations 4.20 and 4.21 are known as Galilean transformation equations. They relate the coordinates and velocity of a particle as measured in a frame fixed relative to the Earth to those measured in a frame moving with uniform motion relative to the Earth. Although observers in two frames measure different velocities for the particle, they measure the same acceleration when v0 is constant. We can verify this by taking the time derivative of Equation 4.21: dv dt dv dt d v0 dt Because v0 is constant, d v0 /dt 0. Therefore, we conclude that a a because a dv /dt and a dv/dt. That is, the acceleration of the particle measured by an observer in the Earth's frame of reference is the same as that measured by any other observer moving with constant velocity relative to the Earth's frame. Quick Quiz 4.5 A passenger in a car traveling at 60 mi/h pours a cup of coffee for the tired driver. Describe the path of the coffee as it moves from a Thermos bottle into a cup as seen by (a) the passenger and (b) someone standing beside the road and looking in the window of the car as it drives past. (c) What happens if the car accelerates while the coffee is being poured? 98 CHAPTER 4 Motion in Two Dimensions EXAMPLE 4.9 A Boat Crossing a River The boat is moving at a speed of 11.2 km/h in the direction 26.6 east of north relative to the Earth. A boat heading due north crosses a wide river with a speed of 10.0 km/h relative to the water. The water in the river has a uniform speed of 5.00 km/h due east relative to the Earth. Determine the velocity of the boat relative to an observer standing on either bank. We know vbr , the velocity of the boat relative to the river, and vrE , the velocity of the river relative to the Earth. What we need to find is vbE , the velocity of the boat relative to the Earth. The relationship between these three quantities is vbE vbr vrE Exercise Answer If the width of the river is 3.0 km, find the time it takes the boat to cross it. 18 min. Solution The terms in the equation must be manipulated as vector quantities; the vectors are shown in Figure 4.22. The quantity vbr is due north, vrE is due east, and the vector sum of the two, vbE , is at an angle , as defined in Figure 4.22. Thus, we can find the speed v bE of the boat relative to the Earth by using the Pythagorean theorem: v bE vrE vbE vbr W N E S v br 2 v rE 2 (10.0)2 (5.00)2 km/h 11.2 km/h The direction of vbE is tan 1 v rE v br tan 1 5.00 10.0 26.6 Figure 4.22 EXAMPLE 4.10 Which Way Should We Head? If the boat of the preceding example travels with the same speed of 10.0 km/h relative to the river and is to travel due north, as shown in Figure 4.23, what should its heading be? Exercise Answer If the width of the river is 3.0 km, find the time it takes the boat to cross it. 21 min. Solution As in the previous example, we know vrE and the magnitude of the vector vbr , and we want vbE to be directed across the river. Figure 4.23 shows that the boat must head upstream in order to travel directly northward across the river. Note the difference between the triangle in Figure 4.22 and the one in Figure 4.23 -- specifically, that the hypotenuse in Figure 4.23 is no longer vbE . Therefore, when we use the Pythagorean theorem to find vbE this time, we obtain vrE vbE vbr W N E S v bE v br2 v rE2 (10.0)2 (5.00)2 km/h 8.66 km/h Now that we know the magnitude of vbE , we can find the direction in which the boat is heading: tan 1 v rE v bE tan 1 5.00 8.66 30.0 The boat must steer a course 30.0 west of north. Figure 4.23 Summary 99 SUMMARY If a particle moves with constant acceleration a and has velocity vi and position ri at t 0, its velocity and position vectors at some later time t are vf rf vi ri at vi t 1 2 (4.8) at 2 (4.9) For two-dimensional motion in the xy plane under constant acceleration, each of these vector expressions is equivalent to two component expressions -- one for the motion in the x direction and one for the motion in the y direction. You should be able to break the two-dimensional motion of any object into these two components. Projectile motion is one type of two-dimensional motion under constant acceleration, where a x 0 and a y g. It is useful to think of projectile motion as the superposition of two motions: (1) constant-velocity motion in the x direction and (2) free-fall motion in the vertical direction subject to a constant downward acceleration of magnitude g 9.80 m/s2. You should be able to analyze the motion in terms of separate horizontal and vertical components of velocity, as shown in Figure 4.24. A particle moving in a circle of radius r with constant speed v is in uniform circular motion. It undergoes a centripetal (or radial) acceleration ar because the direction of v changes in time. The magnitude of ar is ar v2 r (4.18) and its direction is always toward the center of the circle. If a particle moves along a curved path in such a way that both the magnitude and the direction of v change in time, then the particle has an acceleration vector that can be described by two component vectors: (1) a radial component vector ar that causes the change in direction of v and (2) a tangential component vector at that causes the change in magnitude of v. The magnitude of ar is v 2/r, and the magnitude of at is d v /dt. You should be able to sketch motion diagrams for an object following a curved path and show how the velocity and acceleration vectors change as the object's motion varies. The velocity v of a particle measured in a fixed frame of reference S can be related to the velocity v of the same particle measured in a moving frame of reference S by v v v0 (4.21) where v0 is the velocity of S relative to S. You should be able to translate back and forth between different frames of reference. vxf = vx i = vi cos i vi (x, y) vy i vy f y i y x Horizontal and... motion at constant velocity x Projectile motion is equivalent to... Vertical motion at constant acceleration Figure 4.24 Analyzing projectile motion in terms of horizontal and vertical components. 100 CHAPTER 4 Motion in Two Dimensions QUESTIONS 1. Can an object accelerate if its speed is constant? Can an object accelerate if its velocity is constant? 2. If the average velocity of a particle is zero in some time interval, what can you say about the displacement of the particle for that interval? 3. If you know the position vectors of a particle at two points along its path and also know the time it took to get from one point to the other, can you determine the particle's instantaneous velocity? Its average velocity? Explain. 4. Describe a situation in which the velocity of a particle is always perpendicular to the position vector. 5. Explain whether or not the following particles have an acceleration: (a) a particle moving in a straight line with constant speed and (b) a particle moving around a curve with constant speed. 6. Correct the following statement: "The racing car rounds the turn at a constant velocity of 90 mi/h.'' 7. Determine which of the following moving objects have an approximately parabolic trajectory: (a) a ball thrown in an arbitrary direction, (b) a jet airplane, (c) a rocket leaving the launching pad, (d) a rocket whose engines fail a few minutes after launch, (e) a tossed stone moving to the bottom of a pond. 8. A rock is dropped at the same instant that a ball at the same initial elevation is thrown horizontally. Which will have the greater speed when it reaches ground level? 9. A spacecraft drifts through space at a constant velocity. Suddenly, a gas leak in the side of the spacecraft causes a constant acceleration of the spacecraft in a direction perpendicular to the initial velocity. The orientation of the spacecraft does not change, and so the acceleration remains perpendicular to the original direction of the velocity. What is the shape of the path followed by the spacecraft in this situation? 10. A ball is projected horizontally from the top of a building. One second later another ball is projected horizontally from the same point with the same velocity. At what point in the motion will the balls be closest to each other? Will the first ball always be traveling faster than the second ball? How much time passes between the moment the first ball hits the ground and the moment the second one hits the ground? Can the horizontal projection velocity of the second ball be changed so that the balls arrive at the ground at the same time? 11. A student argues that as a satellite orbits the Earth in a circular path, the satellite moves with a constant velocity and therefore has no acceleration. The professor claims that the student is wrong because the satellite must have a centripetal acceleration as it moves in its circular orbit. What is wrong with the student's argument? What is the fundamental difference between the unit vec^ tors r and ^ and the unit vectors i and j? At the end of its arc, the velocity of a pendulum is zero. Is its acceleration also zero at this point? If a rock is dropped from the top of a sailboat's mast, will it hit the deck at the same point regardless of whether the boat is at rest or in motion at constant velocity? A stone is thrown upward from the top of a building. Does the stone's displacement depend on the location of the origin of the coordinate system? Does the stone's velocity depend on the location of the origin? Is it possible for a vehicle to travel around a curve without accelerating? Explain. A baseball is thrown with an initial velocity of (10i 15j) m/s. When it reaches the top of its trajectory, what are (a) its velocity and (b) its acceleration? Neglect the effect of air resistance. An object moves in a circular path with constant speed v. (a) Is the velocity of the object constant? (b) Is its acceleration constant? Explain. A projectile is fired at some angle to the horizontal with some initial speed vi , and air resistance is neglected. Is the projectile a freely falling body? What is its acceleration in the vertical direction? What is its acceleration in the horizontal direction? A projectile is fired at an angle of 30 from the horizontal with some initial speed. Firing at what other projectile angle results in the same range if the initial speed is the same in both cases? Neglect air resistance. A projectile is fired on the Earth with some initial velocity. Another projectile is fired on the Moon with the same initial velocity. If air resistance is neglected, which projectile has the greater range? Which reaches the greater altitude? (Note that the free-fall acceleration on the Moon is about 1.6 m/s2.) As a projectile moves through its parabolic trajectory, which of these quantities, if any, remain constant: (a) speed, (b) acceleration, (c) horizontal component of velocity, (d) vertical component of velocity? A passenger on a train that is moving with constant velocity drops a spoon. What is the acceleration of the spoon relative to (a) the train and (b) the Earth? 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. Problems 101 PROBLEMS 1, 2, 3 = straightforward, intermediate, challenging = full solution available in the Student Solutions Manual and Study Guide WEB = solution posted at http://www.saunderscollege.com/physics/ = Computer useful in solving problem = Interactive Physics = paired numerical/symbolic problems Section 4.1 Vectors WEB The Displacement, Velocity, and Acceleration 1. A motorist drives south at 20.0 m/s for 3.00 min, then turns west and travels at 25.0 m/s for 2.00 min, and finally travels northwest at 30.0 m/s for 1.00 min. For this 6.00-min trip, find (a) the total vector displacement, (b) the average speed, and (c) the average velocity. Use a coordinate system in which east is the positive x axis. 2. Suppose that the position vector for a particle is given as r x i y j, with x at b and y ct 2 d, where a 1.00 m/s, b 1.00 m, c 0.125 m/s2, and d 1.00 m. (a) Calculate the average velocity during the time interval from t 2.00 s to t 4.00 s. (b) Determine the velocity and the speed at t 2.00 s. 3. A golf ball is hit off a tee at the edge of a cliff. Its x and y coordinates versus time are given by the following expressions: x and y (4.00 m/s)t (4.90 m/s2)t 2 (18.0 m/s)t 6. The vector position of a particle varies in time according to the expression r (3.00i 6.00t 2 j) m. (a) Find expressions for the velocity and acceleration as functions of time. (b) Determine the particle's position and velocity at t 1.00 s. 7. A fish swimming in a horizontal plane has velocity vi (4.00i 1.00j) m/s at a point in the ocean whose displacement from a certain rock is ri (10.0i 4.00j) m. After the fish swims with constant acceleration for 20.0 s, its velocity is v (20.0i 5.00j) m/s. (a) What are the components of the acceleration? (b) What is the direction of the acceleration with respect to the unit vector i? (c) Where is the fish at t 25.0 s if it maintains its original acceleration and in what direction is it moving? 8. A particle initially located at the origin has an acceleration of a 3.00j m/s2 and an initial velocity of vi 5.00i m/s. Find (a) the vector position and velocity at any time t and (b) the coordinates and speed of the particle at t 2.00 s. Section 4.3 Projectile Motion (a) Write a vector expression for the ball's position as a function of time, using the unit vectors i and j. By taking derivatives of your results, write expressions for (b) the velocity vector as a function of time and (c) the acceleration vector as a function of time. Now use unit vector notation to write expressions for (d) the position, (e) the velocity, and (f) the acceleration of the ball, all at t 3.00 s. 4. The coordinates of an object moving in the xy plane vary with time according to the equations x and y (4.00 m) (5.00 m)cos t where t is in seconds and has units of seconds 1. (a) Determine the components of velocity and components of acceleration at t 0. (b) Write expressions for the position vector, the velocity vector, and the acceleration vector at any time t 0. (c) Describe the path of the object on an xy graph. (5.00 m) sin t (Neglect air resistance in all problems and take g 9.80 m/s2.) WEB 9. In a local bar, a customer slides an empty beer mug down the counter for a refill. The bartender is momentarily distracted and does not see the mug, which slides off the counter and strikes the floor 1.40 m from the base of the counter. If the height of the counter is 0.860 m, (a) with what velocity did the mug leave the counter and (b) what was the direction of the mug's velocity just before it hit the floor? 10. In a local bar, a customer slides an empty beer mug down the counter for a refill. The bartender is momentarily distracted and does not see the mug, which slides off the counter and strikes the floor at distance d from the base of the counter. If the height of the counter is h, (a) with what velocity did the mug leave the counter and (b) what was the direction of the mug's velocity just before it hit the floor? Section 4.2 Two-Dimensional Motion with Constant Acceleration 5. At t 0, a particle moving in the xy plane with constant acceleration has a velocity of vi (3.00i 2.00 j) m/s when it is at the origin. At t 3.00 s, the particle's velocity is v (9.00i 7.00j) m/s. Find (a) the acceleration of the particle and (b) its coordinates at any time t. 11. One strategy in a snowball fight is to throw a first snowball at a high angle over level ground. While your opponent is watching the first one, you throw a second one at a low angle and timed to arrive at your opponent before or at the same time as the first one. Assume both snowballs are thrown with a speed of 25.0 m/s. The first one is thrown at an angle of 70.0 with respect to the horizontal. (a) At what angle should the second (lowangle) snowball be thrown if it is to land at the same point as the first? (b) How many seconds later should 102 CHAPTER 4 Motion in Two Dimensions 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. WEB 19. the second snowball be thrown if it is to land at the same time as the first? A tennis player standing 12.6 m from the net hits the ball at 3.00 above the horizontal. To clear the net, the ball must rise at least 0.330 m. If the ball just clears the net at the apex of its trajectory, how fast was the ball moving when it left the racket? An artillery shell is fired with an initial velocity of 300 m/s at 55.0 above the horizontal. It explodes on a mountainside 42.0 s after firing. What are the x and y coordinates of the shell where it explodes, relative to its firing point? An astronaut on a strange planet finds that she can jump a maximum horizontal distance of 15.0 m if her initial speed is 3.00 m/s. What is the free-fall acceleration on the planet? A projectile is fired in such a way that its horizontal range is equal to three times its maximum height. What is the angle of projection? Give your answer to three significant figures. A ball is tossed from an upper-story window of a building. The ball is given an initial velocity of 8.00 m/s at an angle of 20.0 below the horizontal. It strikes the ground 3.00 s later. (a) How far horizontally from the base of the building does the ball strike the ground? (b) Find the height from which the ball was thrown. (c) How long does it take the ball to reach a point 10.0 m below the level of launching? A cannon with a muzzle speed of 1 000 m/s is used to start an avalanche on a mountain slope. The target is 2 000 m from the cannon horizontally and 800 m above the cannon. At what angle, above the horizontal, should the cannon be fired? Consider a projectile that is launched from the origin of an xy coordinate system with speed vi at initial angle i above the horizontal. Note that at the apex of its trajectory the projectile is moving horizontally, so that the slope of its path is zero. Use the expression for the trajectory given in Equation 4.12 to find the x coordinate that corresponds to the maximum height. Use this x coordinate and the symmetry of the trajectory to determine the horizontal range of the projectile. A placekicker must kick a football from a point 36.0 m (about 40 yards) from the goal, and half the crowd hopes the ball will clear the crossbar, which is 3.05 m high. When kicked, the ball leaves the ground with a speed of 20.0 m/s at an angle of 53.0 to the horizontal. (a) By how much does the ball clear or fall short of clearing the crossbar? (b) Does the ball approach the crossbar while still rising or while falling? h vi i d Figure P4.20 tional) Problems 20 and 21. (Frederick McKinney/FPG Interna- 21. A firefighter a distance d from a burning building directs a stream of water from a fire hose at angle i above the horizontal as in Figure P4.20. If the initial speed of the stream is vi , at what height h does the water strike the building? 22. A soccer player kicks a rock horizontally off a cliff 40.0 m high into a pool of water. If the player hears the sound of the splash 3.00 s later, what was the initial speed given to the rock? Assume the speed of sound in air to be 343 m/s. 20. A firefighter 50.0 m away from a burning building directs a stream of water from a fire hose at an angle of 30.0 above the horizontal, as in Figure P4.20. If the speed of the stream is 40.0 m/s, at what height will the water strike the building? Problems 23. A basketball star covers 2.80 m horizontally in a jump to dunk the ball (Fig. P4.23). His motion through space can be modeled as that of a particle at a point called his center of mass (which we shall define in Chapter 9). His center of mass is at elevation 1.02 m when he leaves the floor. It reaches a maximum height of 1.85 m above the floor and is at elevation 0.900 m when he touches down again. Determine (a) his time of flight (his "hang time"), (b) his horizontal and (c) vertical velocity components at the instant of takeoff, and (d) his takeoff angle. (e) For comparison, determine the hang time of a whitetail deer making a jump with center-of-mass elevations y i 1.20 m, y max 2.50 m, y f 0.700 m. 103 Section 4.4 Uniform Circular Motion WEB 24. The orbit of the Moon about the Earth is approximately circular, with a mean radius of 3.84 108 m. It takes 27.3 days for the Moon to complete one revolution about the Earth. Find (a) the mean orbital speed of the Moon and (b) its centripetal acceleration. 25. The athlete shown in Figure P4.25 rotates a 1.00-kg discus along a circular path of radius 1.06 m. The maximum speed of the discus is 20.0 m/s. Determine the magnitude of the maximum radial acceleration of the discus. Figure P4.25 (Sam Sargent/Liaison International) Figure P4.23 (Top, Ron Chapple/FPG International; bottom, Bill Lea/Dembinsky Photo Associates) 26. From information on the endsheets of this book, compute, for a point located on the surface of the Earth at the equator, the radial acceleration due to the rotation of the Earth about its axis. 27. A tire 0.500 m in radius rotates at a constant rate of 200 rev/min. Find the speed and acceleration of a small stone lodged in the tread of the tire (on its outer edge). (Hint: In one revolution, the stone travels a distance equal to the circumference of its path, 2 r.) 28. During liftoff, Space Shuttle astronauts typically feel accelerations up to 1.4g, where g 9.80 m/s2. In their training, astronauts ride in a device where they experience such an acceleration as a centripetal acceleration. Specifically, the astronaut is fastened securely at the end of a mechanical arm that then turns at constant speed in a horizontal circle. Determine the rotation rate, in revolutions per second, required to give an astronaut a centripetal acceleration of 1.40g while the astronaut moves in a circle of radius 10.0 m. 29. Young David who slew Goliath experimented with slings before tackling the giant. He found that he could revolve a sling of length 0.600 m at the rate of 8.00 rev/s. If he increased the length to 0.900 m, he could revolve the sling only 6.00 times per second. (a) Which rate of rotation gives the greater speed for the stone at the end of the sling? (b) What is the centripetal acceleration of the stone at 8.00 rev/s? (c) What is the centripetal acceleration at 6.00 rev/s? 104 CHAPTER 4 Motion in Two Dimensions at a given instant of time. At this instant, find (a) the radial acceleration, (b) the speed of the particle, and (c) its tangential acceleration. 34. A student attaches a ball to the end of a string 0.600 m in length and then swings the ball in a vertical circle. The speed of the ball is 4.30 m/s at its highest point and 6.50 m/s at its lowest point. Find the acceleration of the ball when the string is vertical and the ball is at (a) its highest point and (b) its lowest point. 35. A ball swings in a vertical circle at the end of a rope 1.50 m long. When the ball is 36.9 past the lowest point and on its way up, its total acceleration is ( 22.5i 20.2j) m/s2. At that instant, (a) sketch a vector diagram showing the components of this acceleration, (b) determine the magnitude of its radial acceleration, and (c) determine the speed and velocity of the ball. 30. The astronaut orbiting the Earth in Figure P4.30 is preparing to dock with a Westar VI satellite. The satellite is in a circular orbit 600 km above the Earth's surface, where the free-fall acceleration is 8.21 m/s2. The radius of the Earth is 6 400 km. Determine the speed of the satellite and the time required to complete one orbit around the Earth. Section 4.6 Relative Velocity and Relative Acceleration Figure P4.30 Section 4.5 (Courtesy of NASA) Tangential and Radial Acceleration 31. A train slows down as it rounds a sharp horizontal curve, slowing from 90.0 km/h to 50.0 km/h in the 15.0 s that it takes to round the curve. The radius of the curve is 150 m. Compute the acceleration at the moment the train speed reaches 50.0 km/h. Assume that the train slows down at a uniform rate during the 15.0-s interval. 32. An automobile whose speed is increasing at a rate of 0.600 m/s2 travels along a circular road of radius 20.0 m. When the instantaneous speed of the automobile is 4.00 m/s, find (a) the tangential acceleration component, (b) the radial acceleration component, and (c) the magnitude and direction of the total acceleration. 33. Figure P4.33 shows the total acceleration and velocity of a particle moving clockwise in a circle of radius 2.50 m a = 15.0 m/s2 v 2.50 m 30.0 a Figure P4.33 36. Heather in her Corvette accelerates at the rate of (3.00i 2.00j) m/s2, while Jill in her Jaguar accelerates at (1.00i 3.00j) m/s2. They both start from rest at the origin of an xy coordinate system. After 5.00 s, (a) what is Heather's speed with respect to Jill, (b) how far apart are they, and (c) what is Heather's acceleration relative to Jill? 37. A river has a steady speed of 0.500 m/s. A student swims upstream a distance of 1.00 km and swims back to the starting point. If the student can swim at a speed of 1.20 m/s in still water, how long does the trip take? Compare this with the time the trip would take if the water were still. 38. How long does it take an automobile traveling in the left lane at 60.0 km/h to pull alongside a car traveling in the right lane at 40.0 km/h if the cars' front bumpers are initially 100 m apart? 39. The pilot of an airplane notes that the compass indicates a heading due west. The airplane's speed relative to the air is 150 km/h. If there is a wind of 30.0 km/h toward the north, find the velocity of the airplane relative to the ground. 40. Two swimmers, Alan and Beth, start at the same point in a stream that flows with a speed v. Both move at the same speed c (c v) relative to the stream. Alan swims downstream a distance L and then upstream the same distance. Beth swims such that her motion relative to the ground is perpendicular to the banks of the stream. She swims a distance L in this direction and then back. The result of the motions of Alan and Beth is that they both return to the starting point. Which swimmer returns first? (Note: First guess at the answer.) 41. A child in danger of drowning in a river is being carried downstream by a current that has a speed of 2.50 km/h. The child is 0.600 km from shore and 0.800 km upstream of a boat landing when a rescue boat sets out. (a) If the boat proceeds at its maximum speed of 20.0 km/h relative to the water, what heading relative to the shore should the pilot take? (b) What angle does Problems the boat velocity make with the shore? (c) How long does it take the boat to reach the child? 42. A bolt drops from the ceiling of a train car that is accelerating northward at a rate of 2.50 m/s2. What is the acceleration of the bolt relative to (a) the train car and (b) the Earth? 43. A science student is riding on a flatcar of a train traveling along a straight horizontal track at a constant speed of 10.0 m/s. The student throws a ball into the air along a path that he judges to make an initial angle of 60.0 with the horizontal and to be in line with the track. The student's professor, who is standing on the ground nearby, observes the ball to rise vertically. How high does she see the ball rise? Path of the projectile vi d 105 i Figure P4.47 (b) For what value of i is d a maximum, and what is that maximum value of d? A student decides to measure the muzzle velocity of the pellets from his BB gun. He points the gun horizontally. On a vertical wall a distance x away from the gun, a target is placed. The shots hit the target a vertical distance y below the gun. (a) Show that the vertical displacement component of the pellets when traveling through the air is given by y Ax 2, where A is a constant. (b) Express the constant A in terms of the initial velocity and the free-fall acceleration. (c) If x 3.00 m and y 0.210 m, what is the initial speed of the pellets? A home run is hit in such a way that the baseball just clears a wall 21.0 m high, located 130 m from home plate. The ball is hit at an angle of 35.0 to the horizontal, and air resistance is negligible. Find (a) the initial speed of the ball, (b) the time it takes the ball to reach the wall, and (c) the velocity components and the speed of the ball when it reaches the wall. (Assume the ball is hit at a height of 1.00 m above the ground.) An astronaut standing on the Moon fires a gun so that the bullet leaves the barrel initially moving in a horizontal direction. (a) What must be the muzzle speed of the bullet so that it travels completely around the Moon and returns to its original location? (b) How long does this trip around the Moon take? Assume that the free-fall acceleration on the Moon is one-sixth that on the Earth. A pendulum of length 1.00 m swings in a vertical plane (Fig. 4.19). When the pendulum is in the two horizontal positions 90 and 270, its speed is 5.00 m/s. (a) Find the magnitude of the radial acceleration and tangential acceleration for these positions. (b) Draw a vector diagram to determine the direction of the total acceleration for these two positions. (c) Calculate the magnitude and direction of the total acceleration. A basketball player who is 2.00 m tall is standing on the floor 10.0 m from the basket, as in Figure P4.52. If he shoots the ball at a 40.0 angle with the horizontal, at what initial speed must he throw so that it goes through the hoop without striking the backboard? The basket height is 3.05 m. A particle has velocity components vx 4 m/s vy (6 m/s2)t 4 m/s 48. ADDITIONAL PROBLEMS 44. A ball is thrown with an initial speed vi at an angle i with the horizontal. The horizontal range of the ball is R, and the ball reaches a maximum height R/6. In terms of R and g, find (a) the time the ball is in motion, (b) the ball's speed at the peak of its path, (c) the initial vertical component of its velocity, (d) its initial speed, and (e) the angle i . (f) Suppose the ball is thrown at the same initial speed found in part (d) but at the angle appropriate for reaching the maximum height. Find this height. (g) Suppose the ball is thrown at the same initial speed but at the angle necessary for maximum range. Find this range. 45. As some molten metal splashes, one droplet flies off to the east with initial speed vi at angle i above the horizontal, and another droplet flies off to the west with the same speed at the same angle above the horizontal, as in Figure P4.45. In terms of vi and i , find the distance between the droplets as a function of time. 49. 50. 51. vi vi i i Figure P4.45 46. A ball on the end of a string is whirled around in a horizontal circle of radius 0.300 m. The plane of the circle is 1.20 m above the ground. The string breaks and the ball lands 2.00 m (horizontally) away from the point on the ground directly beneath the ball's location when the string breaks. Find the radial acceleration of the ball during its circular motion. 47. A projectile is fired up an incline (incline angle ) with an initial speed vi at an angle i with respect to the horizontal ( i ), as shown in Figure P4.47. (a) Show that the projectile travels a distance d up the incline, where d 2v i2 cos g i 52. 53. sin( i ) cos2 Calculate the speed of the particle and the direction tan 1 (vy /vx ) of the velocity vector at t 2.00 s. 54. When baseball players throw the ball in from the outfield, they usually allow it to take one bounce before it reaches the infielder on the theory that the ball arrives 106 CHAPTER 4 Motion in Two Dimensions vi 40.0 3.05 m 2.00 m B 30.0 vi 10.0 m A 1.20 m 30.0 Figure P4.52 Figure P4.57 sooner that way. Suppose that the angle at which a bounced ball leaves the ground is the same as the angle at which the outfielder launched it, as in Figure P4.54, but that the ball's speed after the bounce is one half of what it was before the bounce. (a) Assuming the ball is always thrown with the same initial speed, at what angle should the ball be thrown in order to go the same distance D with one bounce (blue path) as a ball thrown upward at 45.0 with no bounce (green path)? (b) Determine the ratio of the times for the one-bounce and no-bounce throws. 58. A quarterback throws a football straight toward a receiver with an initial speed of 20.0 m/s, at an angle of 30.0 above the horizontal. At that instant, the receiver is 20.0 m from the quarterback. In what direction and with what constant speed should the receiver run to catch the football at the level at which it was thrown? 59. A bomber is flying horizontally over level terrain, with a speed of 275 m/s relative to the ground, at an altitude of 3 000 m. Neglect the effects of air resistance. (a) How far will a bomb travel horizontally between its release from the plane and its impact on the ground? (b) If the plane maintains its original course and speed, where will it be when the bomb hits the ground? (c) At what angle from the vertical should the telescopic bombsight be set so that the bomb will hit the target seen in the sight at the time of release? 60. A person standing at the top of a hemispherical rock of radius R kicks a ball (initially at rest on the top of the rock) to give it horizontal velocity vi as in Figure P4.60. (a) What must be its minimum initial speed if the ball is never to hit the rock after it is kicked? (b) With this initial speed, how far from the base of the rock does the ball hit the ground? 45.0 D Figure P4.54 55. A boy can throw a ball a maximum horizontal distance of 40.0 m on a level field. How far can he throw the same ball vertically upward? Assume that his muscles give the ball the same speed in each case. 56. A boy can throw a ball a maximum horizontal distance of R on a level field. How far can he throw the same ball vertically upward? Assume that his muscles give the ball the same speed in each case. 57. A stone at the end of a sling is whirled in a vertical circle of radius 1.20 m at a constant speed vi 1.50 m/s as in Figure P4.57. The center of the string is 1.50 m above the ground. What is the range of the stone if it is released when the sling is inclined at 30.0 with the horizontal (a) at A? (b) at B ? What is the acceleration of the stone (c) just before it is released at A? (d) just after it is released at A? vi R x Figure P4.60 Problems 107 61. A hawk is flying horizontally at 10.0 m/s in a straight WEB line, 200 m above the ground. A mouse it has been carrying struggles free from its grasp. The hawk continues on its path at the same speed for 2.00 s before attempting to retrieve its prey. To accomplish the retrieval, it dives in a straight line at constant speed and recaptures the mouse 3.00 m above the ground. (a) Assuming no air resistance, find the diving speed of the hawk. (b) What angle did the hawk make with the horizontal during its descent? (c) For how long did the mouse "enjoy" free fall? 62. A truck loaded with cannonball watermelons stops suddenly to avoid running over the edge of a washed-out bridge (Fig. P4.62). The quick stop causes a number of melons to fly off the truck. One melon rolls over the edge with an initial speed vi 10.0 m/s in the horizontal direction. A cross-section of the bank has the shape of the bottom half of a parabola with its vertex at the edge of the road, and with the equation y 2 16x, where x and y are measured in meters. What are the x and y coordinates of the melon when it splatters on the bank? vi = 10 m/s 65. A car is parked on a steep incline overlooking the ocean, where the incline makes an angle of 37.0 below the horizontal. The negligent driver leaves the car in neutral, and the parking brakes are defective. The car rolls from rest down the incline with a constant acceleration of 4.00 m/s2, traveling 50.0 m to the edge of a vertical cliff. The cliff is 30.0 m above the ocean. Find (a) the speed of the car when it reaches the edge of the cliff and the time it takes to get there, (b) the velocity of the car when it lands in the ocean, (c) the total time the car is in motion, and (d) the position of the car when it lands in the ocean, relative to the base of the cliff. 66. The determined coyote is out once more to try to capture the elusive roadrunner. The coyote wears a pair of Acme jet-powered roller skates, which provide a constant horizontal acceleration of 15.0 m/s2 (Fig. P4.66). The coyote starts off at rest 70.0 m from the edge of a cliff at the instant the roadrunner zips past him in the direction of the cliff. (a) If the roadrunner moves with constant speed, determine the minimum speed he must have to reach the cliff before the coyote. At the brink of the cliff, the roadrunner escapes by making a sudden turn, while the coyote continues straight ahead. (b) If the cliff is 100 m above the floor of a canyon, determine where the coyote lands in the canyon (assume his skates remain horizontal and continue to operate when he is in "flight"). (c) Determine the components of the coyote's impact velocity. Coyot Stupidus Chicken Delightus EP BE BEE P Figure P4.62 63. A catapult launches a rocket at an angle of 53.0 above the horizontal with an initial speed of 100 m/s. The rocket engine immediately starts a burn, and for 3.00 s the rocket moves along its initial line of motion with an acceleration of 30.0 m/s2. Then its engine fails, and the rocket proceeds to move in free fall. Find (a) the maximum altitude reached by the rocket, (b) its total time of flight, and (c) its horizontal range. 64. A river flows with a uniform velocity v. A person in a motorboat travels 1.00 km upstream, at which time she passes a log floating by. Always with the same throttle setting, the boater continues to travel upstream for another 60.0 min and then returns downstream to her starting point, which she reaches just as the same log does. Find the velocity of the river. (Hint: The time of travel of the boat after it meets the log equals the time of travel of the log.) Figure P4.66 67. A skier leaves the ramp of a ski jump with a velocity of 10.0 m/s, 15.0 above the horizontal, as in Figure P4.67. The slope is inclined at 50.0, and air resistance is negligible. Find (a) the distance from the ramp to where the jumper lands and (b) the velocity components just before the landing. (How do you think the results might be affected if air resistance were included? Note that jumpers lean forward in the shape of an airfoil, with their hands at their sides, to increase their distance. Why does this work?) 108 CHAPTER 4 Motion in Two Dimensions 68. Two soccer players, Mary and Jane, begin running from nearly the same point at the same time. Mary runs in an easterly direction at 4.00 m/s, while Jane takes off in a direction 60.0 north of east at 5.40 m/s. (a) How long is it before they are 25.0 m apart? (b) What is the velocity of Jane relative to Mary? (c) How far apart are they after 4.00 s? 69. Do not hurt yourself; do not strike your hand against anything. Within these limitations, describe what you do to give your hand a large acceleration. Compute an order-of-magnitude estimate of this acceleration, stating the quantities you measure or estimate and their values. 70. An enemy ship is on the western side of a mountain island, as shown in Figure P4.70. The enemy ship can maneuver to within 2 500 m of the 1 800-m-high mountain peak and can shoot projectiles with an initial speed of 250 m/s. If the eastern shoreline is horizontally 300 m from the peak, what are the distances from the eastern shore at which a ship can be safe from the bombardment of the enemy ship? 10.0 m/s 15.0 50.0 Figure P4.67 v i = 250 m/s vi 1800 m H L 2500 m 300 m Figure P4.70 ANSWERS TO QUICK QUIZZES 4.1 (a) Because acceleration occurs whenever the velocity changes in any way -- with an increase or decrease in speed, a change in direction, or both -- the brake pedal can also be considered an accelerator because it causes the car to slow down. The steering wheel is also an accelerator because it changes the direction of the velocity vector. (b) When the car is moving with constant speed, the gas pedal is not causing an acceleration; it is an accelerator only when it causes a change in the speedometer reading. 4.2 (a) At only one point -- the peak of the trajectory -- are the velocity and acceleration vectors perpendicular to each other. (b) If the object is thrown straight up or down, v and a are parallel to each other throughout the downward motion. Otherwise, the velocity and acceleration vectors are never parallel to each other. (c) The greater the maximum height, the longer it takes the projectile to reach that altitude and then fall back down from it. So, as the angle increases from 0 to 90, the time of flight increases. Therefore, the 15 angle gives the shortest time of flight, and the 75 angle gives the longest. 4.3 (a) Because the object is moving with a constant speed, the velocity vector is always the same length; because the motion is circular, this vector is always tangent to the circle. The only acceleration is that which changes the direction of the velocity vector; it points radially inward. (a) Answers to Quick Quizzes (b) Now there is a component of the acceleration vector that is tangent to the circle and points in the direction opposite the velocity. As a result, the acceleration vector does not point toward the center. The object is slowing down, and so the velocity vectors become shorter and shorter. 109 4.4 The motion diagram is as shown below. Note that each position vector points from the pivot point at the center of the circle to the position of the ball. v=0 a (b) v v=0 (c) Now the tangential component of the acceleration points in the same direction as the velocity. The object is speeding up, and so the velocity vectors become longer and longer. (c) 4.5 (a) The passenger sees the coffee pouring nearly vertically into the cup, just as if she were standing on the ground pouring it. (b) The stationary observer sees the coffee moving in a parabolic path with a constant horizontal velocity of 60 mi/h ( 88 ft/s) and a downward acceleration of g. If it takes the coffee 0.10 s to reach the cup, the stationary observer sees the coffee moving 8.8 ft horizontally before it hits the cup! (c) If the car slows suddenly, the coffee reaches the place where the cup would have been had there been no change in velocity and continues falling because the cup has not yet reached that location. If the car rapidly speeds up, the coffee falls behind the cup. If the car accelerates sideways, the coffee again ends up somewhere other than the cup. P U Z Z L E R The Spirit of Akron is an airship that is more than 60 m long. When it is parked at an airport, one person can easily support it overhead using a single hand. Nonetheless, it is impossible for even a very strong adult to move the ship abruptly. What property of this huge airship makes it very difficult to cause any sudden changes in its motion? (Courtesy of Edward E. Ogden) web For more information about the airship, visit http://www.goodyear.com/us/blimp/ index.html c h a p t e r The Laws of Motion Chapter Outline 5.1 The Concept of Force 5.2 Newton's First Law and Inertial Frames 5.3 Mass 5.4 Newton's Second Law 5.5 The Force of Gravity and Weight 5.6 Newton's Third Law 5.7 Some Applications of Newton's Laws 5.8 Forces of Friction 110 5.1 The Concept of Force 111 I n Chapters 2 and 4, we described motion in terms of displacement, velocity, and acceleration without considering what might cause that motion. What might cause one particle to remain at rest and another particle to accelerate? In this chapter, we investigate what causes changes in motion. The two main factors we need to consider are the forces acting on an object and the mass of the object. We discuss the three basic laws of motion, which deal with forces and masses and were formulated more than three centuries ago by Isaac Newton. Once we understand these laws, we can answer such questions as "What mechanism changes motion?" and "Why do some objects accelerate more than others?" 5.1 THE CONCEPT OF FORCE Everyone has a basic understanding of the concept of force from everyday experience. When you push your empty dinner plate away, you exert a force on it. Similarly, you exert a force on a ball when you throw or kick it. In these examples, the word force is associated with muscular activity and some change in the velocity of an object. Forces do not always cause motion, however. For example, as you sit reading this book, the force of gravity acts on your body and yet you remain stationary. As a second example, you can push (in other words, exert a force) on a large boulder and not be able to move it. What force (if any) causes the Moon to orbit the Earth? Newton answered this and related questions by stating that forces are what cause any change in the velocity of an object. Therefore, if an object moves with uniform motion (constant velocity), no force is required for the motion to be maintained. The Moon's velocity is not constant because it moves in a nearly circular orbit around the Earth. We now know that this change in velocity is caused by the force exerted on the Moon by the Earth. Because only a force can cause a change in velocity, we can think of force as that which causes a body to accelerate. In this chapter, we are concerned with the relationship between the force exerted on an object and the acceleration of that object. What happens when several forces act simultaneously on an object? In this case, the object accelerates only if the net force acting on it is not equal to zero. The net force acting on an object is defined as the vector sum of all forces acting on the object. (We sometimes refer to the net force as the total force, the resultant force, or the unbalanced force.) If the net force exerted on an object is zero, then the acceleration of the object is zero and its velocity remains constant. That is, if the net force acting on the object is zero, then the object either remains at rest or continues to move with constant velocity. When the velocity of an object is constant (including the case in which the object remains at rest), the object is said to be in equilibrium. When a coiled spring is pulled, as in Figure 5.1a, the spring stretches. When a stationary cart is pulled sufficently hard that friction is overcome, as in Figure 5.1b, the cart moves. When a football is kicked, as in Figure 5.1c, it is both deformed and set in motion. These situations are all examples of a class of forces called contact forces. That is, they involve physical contact between two objects. Other examples of contact forces are the force exerted by gas molecules on the walls of a container and the force exerted by your feet on the floor. Another class of forces, known as field forces, do not involve physical contact between two objects but instead act through empty space. The force of gravitational attraction between two objects, illustrated in Figure 5.1d, is an example of this class of force. This gravitational force keeps objects bound to the Earth. The plan- A body accelerates because of an external force Definition of equilibrium 112 CHAPTER 5 The Laws of Motion Contact forces Field forces m M (a) (d) q +Q (b) (e) Iron N S (c) (f) Figure 5.1 Some examples of applied forces. In each case a force is exerted on the object within the boxed area. Some agent in the environment external to the boxed area exerts a force on the object. ets of our Solar System are bound to the Sun by the action of gravitational forces. Another common example of a field force is the electric force that one electric charge exerts on another, as shown in Figure 5.1e. These charges might be those of the electron and proton that form a hydrogen atom. A third example of a field force is the force a bar magnet exerts on a piece of iron, as shown in Figure 5.1f. The forces holding an atomic nucleus together also are field forces but are very short in range. They are the dominating interaction for particle separations of the order of 10 15 m. Early scientists, including Newton, were uneasy with the idea that a force can act between two disconnected objects. To overcome this conceptual problem, Michael Faraday (1791 1867) introduced the concept of a field. According to this approach, when object 1 is placed at some point P near object 2, we say that object 1 interacts with object 2 by virtue of the gravitational field that exists at P. The gravitational field at P is created by object 2. Likewise, a gravitational field created by object 1 exists at the position of object 2. In fact, all objects create a gravitational field in the space around themselves. The distinction between contact forces and field forces is not as sharp as you may have been led to believe by the previous discussion. When examined at the atomic level, all the forces we classify as contact forces turn out to be caused by 5.1 The Concept of Force 113 electric (field) forces of the type illustrated in Figure 5.1e. Nevertheless, in developing models for macroscopic phenomena, it is convenient to use both classifications of forces. The only known fundamental forces in nature are all field forces: (1) gravitational forces between objects, (2) electromagnetic forces between electric charges, (3) strong nuclear forces between subatomic particles, and (4) weak nuclear forces that arise in certain radioactive decay processes. In classical physics, we are concerned only with gravitational and electromagnetic forces. Measuring the Strength of a Force It is convenient to use the deformation of a spring to measure force. Suppose we apply a vertical force to a spring scale that has a fixed upper end, as shown in Figure 5.2a. The spring elongates when the force is applied, and a pointer on the scale reads the value of the applied force. We can calibrate the spring by defining the unit force F1 as the force that produces a pointer reading of 1.00 cm. (Because force is a vector quantity, we use the bold-faced symbol F.) If we now apply a different downward force F2 whose magnitude is 2 units, as seen in Figure 5.2b, the pointer moves to 2.00 cm. Figure 5.2c shows that the combined effect of the two collinear forces is the sum of the effects of the individual forces. Now suppose the two forces are applied simultaneously with F1 downward and F2 horizontal, as illustrated in Figure 5.2d. In this case, the pointer reads 5 cm2 2.24 cm. The single force F that would produce this same reading is the sum of the two vectors F1 and F2 , as described in Figure 5.2d. That is, F tan 1( 0.500) 26.6. F 12 F 22 2.24 units, and its direction is Because forces are vector quantities, you must use the rules of vector addition to obtain the net force acting on an object. QuickLab Find a tennis ball, two drinking straws, and a friend. Place the ball on a table. You and your friend can each apply a force to the ball by blowing through the straws (held horizontally a few centimeters above the table) so that the air rushing out strikes the ball. Try a variety of configurations: Blow in opposite directions against the ball, blow in the same direction, blow at right angles to each other, and so forth. Can you verify the vector nature of the forces? 0 1 2 3 4 0 1 2 3 4 0 1 2 3 4 0 1 2 3 4 F2 F1 F1 F1 F F2 (a) (b) (c) F2 (d) The vector nature of a force is tested with a spring scale. (a) A downward force F1 elongates the spring 1 cm. (b) A downward force F2 elongates the spring 2 cm. (c) When F1 and F2 are applied simultaneously, the spring elongates by 3 cm. (d) When F1 is downward and F2 is 2 2 cm horizontal, the combination of the two forces elongates the spring 1 2 5 cm. Figure 5.2 114 CHAPTER 5 The Laws of Motion 5.2 4.2 NEWTON'S FIRST LAW AND INERTIAL FRAMES QuickLab Use a drinking straw to impart a strong, short-duration burst of air against a tennis ball as it rolls along a tabletop. Make the force perpendicular to the ball's path. What happens to the ball's motion? What is different if you apply a continuous force (constant magnitude and direction) that is directed along the direction of motion? Before we state Newton's first law, consider the following simple experiment. Suppose a book is lying on a table. Obviously, the book remains at rest. Now imagine that you push the book with a horizontal force great enough to overcome the force of friction between book and table. (This force you exert, the force of friction, and any other forces exerted on the book by other objects are referred to as external forces.) You can keep the book in motion with constant velocity by applying a force that is just equal in magnitude to the force of friction and acts in the opposite direction. If you then push harder so that the magnitude of your applied force exceeds the magnitude of the force of friction, the book accelerates. If you stop pushing, the book stops after moving a short distance because the force of friction retards its motion. Suppose you now push the book across a smooth, highly waxed floor. The book again comes to rest after you stop pushing but not as quickly as before. Now imagine a floor so highly polished that friction is absent; in this case, the book, once set in motion, moves until it hits a wall. Before about 1600, scientists felt that the natural state of matter was the state of rest. Galileo was the first to take a different approach to motion and the natural state of matter. He devised thought experiments, such as the one we just discussed for a book on a frictionless surface, and concluded that it is not the nature of an object to stop once set in motion: rather, it is its nature to resist changes in its motion. In his words, "Any velocity once imparted to a moving body will be rigidly maintained as long as the external causes of retardation are removed." This new approach to motion was later formalized by Newton in a form that has come to be known as Newton's first law of motion: In the absence of external forces, an object at rest remains at rest and an object in motion continues in motion with a constant velocity (that is, with a constant speed in a straight line). In simpler terms, we can say that when no force acts on an object, the acceleration of the object is zero. If nothing acts to change the object's motion, then its velocity does not change. From the first law, we conclude that any isolated object (one that does not interact with its environment) is either at rest or moving with constant velocity. The tendency of an object to resist any attempt to change its velocity is called the inertia of the object. Figure 5.3 shows one dramatic example of a consequence of Newton's first law. Another example of uniform (constant-velocity) motion on a nearly frictionless surface is the motion of a light disk on a film of air (the lubricant), as shown in Figure 5.4. If the disk is given an initial velocity, it coasts a great distance before stopping. Finally, consider a spaceship traveling in space and far removed from any planets or other matter. The spaceship requires some propulsion system to change its velocity. However, if the propulsion system is turned off when the spaceship reaches a velocity v, the ship coasts at that constant velocity and the astronauts get a free ride (that is, no propulsion system is required to keep them moving at the velocity v). Newton's first law Definition of inertia Inertial Frames As we saw in Section 4.6, a moving object can be observed from any number of reference frames. Newton's first law, sometimes called the law of inertia, defines a special set of reference frames called inertial frames. An inertial frame of reference Definition of inertial frame 5.2 Newton's First Law and Inertial Frames 115 Figure 5.3 Unless a net external force acts on it, an object at rest remains at rest and an object in motion continues in motion with constant velocity. In this case, the wall of the building did not exert a force on the moving train that was large enough to stop it. is one that is not accelerating. Because Newton's first law deals only with objects that are not accelerating, it holds only in inertial frames. Any reference frame that moves with constant velocity relative to an inertial frame is itself an inertial frame. (The Galilean transformations given by Equations 4.20 and 4.21 relate positions and velocities between two inertial frames.) A reference frame that moves with constant velocity relative to the distant stars is the best approximation of an inertial frame, and for our purposes we can consider planet Earth as being such a frame. The Earth is not really an inertial frame because of its orbital motion around the Sun and its rotational motion about its own axis. As the Earth travels in its nearly circular orbit around the Sun, it experiences an acceleration of about 4.4 10 3 m/s2 directed toward the Sun. In addition, because the Earth rotates about its own axis once every 24 h, a point on the equator experiences an additional acceleration of 3.37 10 2 m/s2 directed toward the center of the Earth. However, these accelerations are small compared with g and can often be neglected. For this reason, we assume that the Earth is an inertial frame, as is any other frame attached to it. If an object is moving with constant velocity, an observer in one inertial frame (say, one at rest relative to the object) claims that the acceleration of the object and the resultant force acting on it are zero. An observer in any other inertial frame also finds that a 0 and F 0 for the object. According to the first law, a body at rest and one moving with constant velocity are equivalent. A passenger in a car moving along a straight road at a constant speed of 100 km/h can easily pour coffee into a cup. But if the driver steps on the gas or brake pedal or turns the steering wheel while the coffee is being poured, the car accelerates and it is no longer an inertial frame. The laws of motion do not work as expected, and the coffee ends up in the passenger's lap! English physicist and mathematician (1642 1727) Isaac Newton was one of the most brilliant scientists in history. Before the age of 30, he formulated the basic concepts and laws of mechanics, discovered the law of universal gravitation, and invented the mathematical methods of calculus. As a consequence of his theories, Newton was able to explain the motions of the planets, the ebb and flow of the tides, and many special features of the motions of the Moon and the Earth. He also interpreted many fundamental observations concerning the nature of light. His contributions to physical theories dominated scientific thought for two centuries and remain important today. (Giraudon/Art Resource) Isaac Newton v = constant Air flow Electric blower Figure 5.4 Air hockey takes advantage of Newton's first law to make the game more exciting. 116 CHAPTER 5 The Laws of Motion Quick Quiz 5.1 True or false: (a) It is possible to have motion in the absence of a force. (b) It is possible to have force in the absence of motion. 5.3 4.3 MASS Definition of mass Imagine playing catch with either a basketball or a bowling ball. Which ball is more likely to keep moving when you try to catch it? Which ball has the greater tendency to remain motionless when you try to throw it? Because the bowling ball is more resistant to changes in its velocity, we say it has greater inertia than the basketball. As noted in the preceding section, inertia is a measure of how an object responds to an external force. Mass is that property of an object that specifies how much inertia the object has, and as we learned in Section 1.1, the SI unit of mass is the kilogram. The greater the mass of an object, the less that object accelerates under the action of an applied force. For example, if a given force acting on a 3-kg mass produces an acceleration of 4 m/s2, then the same force applied to a 6-kg mass produces an acceleration of 2 m/s2. To describe mass quantitatively, we begin by comparing the accelerations a given force produces on different objects. Suppose a force acting on an object of mass m1 produces an acceleration a1 , and the same force acting on an object of mass m 2 produces an acceleration a2 . The ratio of the two masses is defined as the inverse ratio of the magnitudes of the accelerations produced by the force: m1 m2 a2 a1 (5.1) Mass and weight are different quantities If one object has a known mass, the mass of the other object can be obtained from acceleration measurements. Mass is an inherent property of an object and is independent of the object's surroundings and of the method used to measure it. Also, mass is a scalar quantity and thus obeys the rules of ordinary arithmetic. That is, several masses can be combined in simple numerical fashion. For example, if you combine a 3-kg mass with a 5-kg mass, their total mass is 8 kg. We can verify this result experimentally by comparing the acceleration that a known force gives to several objects separately with the acceleration that the same force gives to the same objects combined as one unit. Mass should not be confused with weight. Mass and weight are two different quantities. As we see later in this chapter, the weight of an object is equal to the magnitude of the gravitational force exerted on the object and varies with location. For example, a person who weighs 180 lb on the Earth weighs only about 30 lb on the Moon. On the other hand, the mass of a body is the same everywhere: an object having a mass of 2 kg on the Earth also has a mass of 2 kg on the Moon. 5.4 4.4 NEWTON'S SECOND LAW Newton's first law explains what happens to an object when no forces act on it. It either remains at rest or moves in a straight line with constant speed. Newton's second law answers the question of what happens to an object that has a nonzero resultant force acting on it. 5.4 Newton's Second Law 117 Imagine pushing a block of ice across a frictionless horizontal surface. When you exert some horizontal force F, the block moves with some acceleration a. If you apply a force twice as great, the acceleration doubles. If you increase the applied force to 3F, the acceleration triples, and so on. From such observations, we conclude that the acceleration of an object is directly proportional to the resultant force acting on it. The acceleration of an object also depends on its mass, as stated in the preceding section. We can understand this by considering the following experiment. If you apply a force F to a block of ice on a frictionless surface, then the block undergoes some acceleration a. If the mass of the block is doubled, then the same applied force produces an acceleration a/2. If the mass is tripled, then the same applied force produces an acceleration a/3, and so on. According to this observation, we conclude that the magnitude of the acceleration of an object is inversely proportional to its mass. These observations are summarized in Newton's second law: The acceleration of an object is directly proportional to the net force acting on it and inversely proportional to its mass. Thus, we can relate mass and force through the following mathematical statement of Newton's second law:1 F ma (5.2) Newton's second law Note that this equation is a vector expression and hence is equivalent to three component equations: Fx ma x Fy ma y Fz ma z (5.3) Newton's second law -- component form Quick Quiz 5.2 Is there any relationship between the net force acting on an object and the direction in which the object moves? Unit of Force The SI unit of force is the newton, which is defined as the force that, when acting on a 1-kg mass, produces an acceleration of 1 m/s2. From this definition and Newton's second law, we see that the newton can be expressed in terms of the following fundamental units of mass, length, and time: 1N 1 kg m/s2 (5.4) Definition of newton In the British engineering system, the unit of force is the pound, which is defined as the force that, when acting on a 1-slug mass,2 produces an acceleration of 1 ft/s2: 1 lb 1 slug ft/s2 1 4 (5.5) A convenient approximation is that 1 N 1 lb. Equation 5.2 is valid only when the speed of the object is much less than the speed of light. We treat the relativistic situation in Chapter 39. The slug is the unit of mass in the British engineering system and is that system's counterpart of the SI unit the kilogram. Because most of the calculations in our study of classical mechanics are in SI units, the slug is seldom used in this text. 2 118 CHAPTER 5 The Laws of Motion TABLE 5.1 Units of Force, Mass, and Accelerationa System of Units SI British engineering a Mass kg slug Acceleration m/s2 ft/s2 Force N lb kg m/s2 slug ft/s2 1N 0.225 lb. The units of force, mass, and acceleration are summarized in Table 5.1. We can now understand how a single person can hold up an airship but is not able to change its motion abruptly, as stated at the beginning of the chapter. The mass of the blimp is greater than 6 800 kg. In order to make this large mass accelerate appreciably, a very large force is required -- certainly one much greater than a human can provide. EXAMPLE 5.1 An Accelerating Hockey Puck The resultant force in the y direction is Fy F 1y F 2y F 1 sin( 20) F 2 sin 60 5.2 N (5.0 N)( 0.342) (8.0 N)(0.866) A hockey puck having a mass of 0.30 kg slides on the horizontal, frictionless surface of an ice rink. Two forces act on the puck, as shown in Figure 5.5. The force F1 has a magnitude of 5.0 N, and the force F2 has a magnitude of 8.0 N. Determine both the magnitude and the direction of the puck's acceleration. Now we use Newton's second law in component form to find the x and y components of acceleration: ax ay Fx m Fy m 8.7 N 0.30 kg 5.2 N 0.30 kg 29 m/s2 17 m/s2 Solution Fx The resultant force in the x direction is F 1x F 2x F 1 cos( 20) F 2 cos 60 8.7 N (5.0 N)(0.940) (8.0 N)(0.500) The acceleration has a magnitude of a y F2 F1 = 5.0 N F2 = 8.0 N 60 x 20 F1 (29)2 ay ax (17)2 m/s2 34 m/s2 and its direction relative to the positive x axis is tan 1 tan 1 17 29 30 We can graphically add the vectors in Figure 5.5 to check the reasonableness of our answer. Because the acceleration vector is along the direction of the resultant force, a drawing showing the resultant force helps us check the validity of the answer. Exercise Answer Determine the components of a third force that, when applied to the puck, causes it to have zero acceleration. F 3x 8.7 N, F 3y 5.2 N. Figure 5.5 A hockey puck moving on a frictionless surface accelerates in the direction of the resultant force F1 F2 . 5.5 The Force of Gravity and Weight 119 5.5 THE FORCE OF GRAVITY AND WEIGHT Definition of weight We are well aware that all objects are attracted to the Earth. The attractive force exerted by the Earth on an object is called the force of gravity Fg . This force is directed toward the center of the Earth,3 and its magnitude is called the weight of the object. We saw in Section 2.6 that a freely falling object experiences an acceleration g acting toward the center of the Earth. Applying Newton's second law F ma to a freely falling object of mass m, with a g and F Fg , we obtain Fg mg (5.6) Thus, the weight of an object, being defined as the magnitude of Fg , is mg. (You should not confuse the italicized symbol g for gravitational acceleration with the nonitalicized symbol g used as the abbreviation for "gram.") Because it depends on g, weight varies with geographic location. Hence, weight, unlike mass, is not an inherent property of an object. Because g decreases with increasing distance from the center of the Earth, bodies weigh less at higher altitudes than at sea level. For example, a 1 000-kg palette of bricks used in the construction of the Empire State Building in New York City weighed about 1 N less by the time it was lifted from sidewalk level to the top of the building. As another example, suppose an object has a mass of 70.0 kg. Its weight in a location where g 9.80 m/s2 is Fg mg 686 N (about 150 lb). At the top of a mountain, however, where g 9.77 m/s2, its weight is only 684 N. Therefore, if you want to lose weight without going on a diet, climb a mountain or weigh yourself at 30 000 ft during an airplane flight! Because weight Fg mg, we can compare the masses of two objects by measuring their weights on a spring scale. At a given location, the ratio of the weights of two objects equals the ratio of their masses. QuickLab Drop a pen and your textbook simultaneously from the same height and watch as they fall. How can they have the same acceleration when their weights are so different? The life-support unit strapped to the back of astronaut Edwin Aldrin weighed 300 lb on the Earth. During his training, a 50-lb mock-up was used. Although this effectively simulated the reduced weight the unit would have on the Moon, it did not correctly mimic the unchanging mass. It was just as difficult to accelerate the unit (perhaps by jumping or twisting suddenly) on the Moon as on the Earth. 3 This statement ignores the fact that the mass distribution of the Earth is not perfectly spherical. 120 CHAPTER 5 The Laws of Motion CONCEPTUAL EXAMPLE 5.2 How Much Do You Weigh in an Elevator? You have most likely had the experience of standing in an elevator that accelerates upward as it moves toward a higher floor. In this case, you feel heavier. In fact, if you are standing on a bathroom scale at the time, the scale measures a force magnitude that is greater than your weight. Thus, you have tactile and measured evidence that leads you to believe you are heavier in this situation. Are you heavier? Solution No, your weight is unchanged. To provide the acceleration upward, the floor or scale must exert on your feet an upward force that is greater in magnitude than your weight. It is this greater force that you feel, which you interpret as feeling heavier. The scale reads this upward force, not your weight, and so its reading increases. Quick Quiz 5.3 A baseball of mass m is thrown upward with some initial speed. If air resistance is neglected, what forces are acting on the ball when it reaches (a) half its maximum height and (b) its maximum height? 5.6 4.5 NEWTON'S THIRD LAW If you press against a corner of this textbook with your fingertip, the book pushes back and makes a small dent in your skin. If you push harder, the book does the same and the dent in your skin gets a little larger. This simple experiment illustrates a general principle of critical importance known as Newton's third law: If two objects interact, the force F12 exerted by object 1 on object 2 is equal in magnitude to and opposite in direction to the force F21 exerted by object 2 on object 1: F12 F21 (5.7) Newton's third law This law, which is illustrated in Figure 5.6a, states that a force that affects the motion of an object must come from a second, external, object. The external object, in turn, is subject to an equal-magnitude but oppositely directed force exerted on it. Fhn Fnh 2 F12 F12 = F21 F21 1 (a) (b) Figure 5.6 Newton's third law. (a) The force F12 exerted by object 1 on object 2 is equal in magnitude to and opposite in direction to the force F21 exerted by object 2 on object 1. (b) The force Fhn exerted by the hammer on the nail is equal to and opposite the force Fnh exerted by the nail on the hammer. 5.6 Newton's Third Law 121 This is equivalent to stating that a single isolated force cannot exist. The force that object 1 exerts on object 2 is sometimes called the action force, while the force object 2 exerts on object 1 is called the reaction force. In reality, either force can be labeled the action or the reaction force. The action force is equal in magnitude to the reaction force and opposite in direction. In all cases, the action and reaction forces act on different objects. For example, the force acting on a freely falling projectile is Fg mg, which is the force of gravity exerted by the Earth on the projectile. The reaction to this force is the force exerted by the projectile on the Earth, Fg Fg . The reaction force Fg accelerates the Earth toward the projectile just as the action force Fg accelerates the projectile toward the Earth. However, because the Earth has such a great mass, its acceleration due to this reaction force is negligibly small. Another example of Newton's third law is shown in Figure 5.6b. The force exerted by the hammer on the nail (the action force Fhn ) is equal in magnitude and opposite in direction to the force exerted by the nail on the hammer (the reaction force Fnh). It is this latter force that causes the hammer to stop its rapid forward motion when it strikes the nail. You experience Newton's third law directly whenever you slam your fist against a wall or kick a football. You should be able to identify the action and reaction forces in these cases. F Compression of a football as the force exerted by a player's foot sets the ball in motion. Quick Quiz 5.4 A person steps from a boat toward a dock. Unfortunately, he forgot to tie the boat to the dock, and the boat scoots away as he steps from it. Analyze this situation in terms of Newton's third law. The force of gravity Fg was defined as the attractive force the Earth exerts on an object. If the object is a TV at rest on a table, as shown in Figure 5.7a, why does the TV not accelerate in the direction of Fg ? The TV does not accelerate because the table holds it up. What is happening is that the table exerts on the TV an upward force n called the normal force.4 The normal force is a contact force that prevents the TV from falling through the table and can have any magnitude needed to balance the downward force Fg , up to the point of breaking the table. If someone stacks books on the TV, the normal force exerted by the table on the TV increases. If someone lifts up on the TV, the normal force exerted by the table on the TV decreases. (The normal force becomes zero if the TV is raised off the table.) The two forces in an action reaction pair always act on different objects. For the hammer-and-nail situation shown in Figure 5.6b, one force of the pair acts on the hammer and the other acts on the nail. For the unfortunate person stepping out of the boat in Quick Quiz 5.4, one force of the pair acts on the person, and the other acts on the boat. For the TV in Figure 5.7, the force of gravity Fg and the normal force n are not an action reaction pair because they act on the same body -- the TV. The two reaction forces in this situation -- Fg and n -- are exerted on objects other than the TV. Because the reaction to Fg is the force Fg exerted by the TV on the Earth and the reaction to n is the force n exerted by the TV on the table, we conclude that Fg 4 Definition of normal force Fg and n n Normal in this context means perpendicular. 122 CHAPTER 5 The Laws of Motion n n Fg Fg n F g (a) (b) When a TV is at rest on a table, the forces acting on the TV are the normal force n and the force of gravity Fg , as illustrated in part (b). The reaction to n is the force n exerted by the TV on the table. The reaction to Fg is the force Fg exerted by the TV on the Earth. Figure 5.7 The forces n and n have the same magnitude, which is the same as that of Fg until the table breaks. From the second law, we see that, because the TV is in equilibrium (a 0), it follows5 that F g n mg. Quick Quiz 5.5 If a fly collides with the windshield of a fast-moving bus, (a) which experiences the greater impact force: the fly or the bus, or is the same force experienced by both? (b) Which experiences the greater acceleration: the fly or the bus, or is the same acceleration experienced by both? CONCEPTUAL EXAMPLE 5.3 You Push Me and I'll Push You Therefore, the boy, having the lesser mass, experiences the greater acceleration. Both individuals accelerate for the same amount of time, but the greater acceleration of the boy over this time interval results in his moving away from the interaction with the higher speed. (b) Who moves farther while their hands are in contact? A large man and a small boy stand facing each other on frictionless ice. They put their hands together and push against each other so that they move apart. (a) Who moves away with the higher speed? Solution This situation is similar to what we saw in Quick Quiz 5.5. According to Newton's third law, the force exerted by the man on the boy and the force exerted by the boy on the man are an action reaction pair, and so they must be equal in magnitude. (A bathroom scale placed between their hands would read the same, regardless of which way it faced.) 5 Solution Because the boy has the greater acceleration, he moves farther during the interval in which the hands are in contact. Technically, we should write this equation in the component form Fgy ny mgy . This component notation is cumbersome, however, and so in situations in which a vector is parallel to a coordinate axis, we usually do not include the subscript for that axis because there is no other component. 5.7 Some Applications of Newton's Laws 123 5.7 4.6 SOME APPLICATIONS OF NEWTON'S LAWS In this section we apply Newton's laws to objects that are either in equilibrium (a 0) or accelerating along a straight line under the action of constant external forces. We assume that the objects behave as particles so that we need not worry about rotational motion. We also neglect the effects of friction in those problems involving motion; this is equivalent to stating that the surfaces are frictionless. Finally, we usually neglect the mass of any ropes involved. In this approximation, the magnitude of the force exerted at any point along a rope is the same at all points along the rope. In problem statements, the synonymous terms light, lightweight, and of negligible mass are used to indicate that a mass is to be ignored when you work the problems. When we apply Newton's laws to an object, we are interested only in external forces that act on the object. For example, in Figure 5.7 the only external forces acting on the TV are n and Fg . The reactions to these forces, n and Fg , act on the table and on the Earth, respectively, and therefore do not appear in Newton's second law applied to the TV. When a rope attached to an object is pulling on the object, the rope exerts a force T on the object, and the magnitude of that force is called the tension in the rope. Because it is the magnitude of a vector quantity, tension is a scalar quantity. Consider a crate being pulled to the right on a frictionless, horizontal surface, as shown in Figure 5.8a. Suppose you are asked to find the acceleration of the crate and the force the floor exerts on it. First, note that the horizontal force being applied to the crate acts through the rope. Use the symbol T to denote the force exerted by the rope on the crate. The magnitude of T is equal to the tension in the rope. A dotted circle is drawn around the crate in Figure 5.8a to remind you that you are interested only in the forces acting on the crate. These are illustrated in Figure 5.8b. In addition to the force T, this force diagram for the crate includes the force of gravity Fg and the normal force n exerted by the floor on the crate. Such a force diagram, referred to as a free-body diagram, shows all external forces acting on the object. The construction of a correct free-body diagram is an important step in applying Newton's laws. The reactions to the forces we have listed -- namely, the force exerted by the crate on the rope, the force exerted by the crate on the Earth, and the force exerted by the crate on the floor -- are not included in the free-body diagram because they act on other bodies and not on the crate. We can now apply Newton's second law in component form to the crate. The only force acting in the x direction is T. Applying Fx max to the horizontal motion gives Fx T ma x or ax T m Fy may with ay 0 Tension (a) n y x T No acceleration occurs in the y direction. Applying yields n ( F g) 0 or n Fg Fg (b) That is, the normal force has the same magnitude as the force of gravity but is in the opposite direction. If T is a constant force, then the acceleration ax T/m also is constant. Hence, the constant-acceleration equations of kinematics from Chapter 2 can be used to obtain the crate's displacement x and velocity vx as functions of time. Be- Figure 5.8 (a) A crate being pulled to the right on a frictionless surface. (b) The free-body diagram representing the external forces acting on the crate. 124 F CHAPTER 5 The Laws of Motion cause ax T/m constant, Equations 2.8 and 2.11 can be written as v xf x v xi v xi t 1 2 T t m T 2 t m Fg n Figure 5.9 When one object pushes downward on another object with a force F, the normal force n is greater than the force of gravity: n Fg F. In the situation just described, the magnitude of the normal force n is equal to the magnitude of Fg , but this is not always the case. For example, suppose a book is lying on a table and you push down on the book with a force F, as shown in Figure 5.9. Because the book is at rest and therefore not accelerating, Fy 0, which gives n F g F 0, or n F g F. Other examples in which n F g are presented later. Consider a lamp suspended from a light chain fastened to the ceiling, as in Figure 5.10a. The free-body diagram for the lamp (Figure 5.10b) shows that the forces acting on the lamp are the downward force of gravity Fg and the upward force T exerted by the chain. If we apply the second law to the lamp, noting that a 0, we see that because there are no forces in the x direction, Fx 0 provides no helpful information. The condition Fy may 0 gives Fy T Fg 0 or T Fg T = T T Again, note that T and Fg are not an action reaction pair because they act on the same object -- the lamp. The reaction force to T is T , the downward force exerted by the lamp on the chain, as shown in Figure 5.10c. The ceiling exerts on the chain a force T that is equal in magnitude to the magnitude of T and points in the opposite direction. T (c) Fg (b) (a) (a) A lamp suspended from a ceiling by a chain of negligible mass. (b) The forces acting on the lamp are the force of gravity Fg and the force exerted by the chain T. (c) The forces acting on the chain are the force exerted by the lamp T and the force exerted by the ceiling T . Figure 5.10 Problem-Solving Hints Applying Newton's Laws The following procedure is recommended when dealing with problems involving Newton's laws: Draw a simple, neat diagram of the system. Isolate the object whose motion is being analyzed. Draw a free-body diagram for this object. For systems containing more than one object, draw separate free-body diagrams for each object. Do not include in the free-body diagram forces exerted by the object on its surroundings. Establish convenient coordinate axes for each object and find the components of the forces along these axes. Apply Newton's second law, F ma, in component form. Check your dimensions to make sure that all terms have units of force. Solve the component equations for the unknowns. Remember that you must have as many independent equations as you have unknowns to obtain a complete solution. Make sure your results are consistent with the free-body diagram. Also check the predictions of your solutions for extreme values of the variables. By doing so, you can often detect errors in your results. 5.7 Some Applications of Newton's Laws 125 EXAMPLE 5.4 A Traffic Light at Rest (1) (2) Fx Fy T1 cos 37.0 T1 sin 37.0 ( 125 N) 0 T2 cos 53.0 T2 sin 53.0 0 A traffic light weighing 125 N hangs from a cable tied to two other cables fastened to a support. The upper cables make angles of 37.0 and 53.0 with the horizontal. Find the tension in the three cables. Solution Figure 5.11a shows the type of drawing we might make of this situation. We then construct two free-body diagrams -- one for the traffic light, shown in Figure 5.11b, and one for the knot that holds the three cables together, as seen in Figure 5.11c. This knot is a convenient object to choose because all the forces we are interested in act through it. Because the acceleration of the system is zero, we know that the net force on the light and the net force on the knot are both zero. In Figure 5.11b the force T3 exerted by the vertical cable supports the light, and so T3 Fg 125 N. Next, we choose the coordinate axes shown in Figure 5.11c and resolve the forces acting on the knot into their components: From (1) we see that the horizontal components of T1 and T2 must be equal in magnitude, and from (2) we see that the sum of the vertical components of T1 and T2 must balance the weight of the light. We solve (1) for T2 in terms of T1 to obtain T2 T1 cos 37.0 cos 53.0 1.33T1 This value for T2 is substituted into (2) to yield T1 sin 37.0 T1 T2 (1.33T1)(sin 53.0) 75.1 N 1.33T1 99.9 N 125 N 0 Force x Component y Component T1 T2 T3 T1 cos 37.0 T2 cos 53.0 0 T1 sin 37.0 T2 sin 53.0 125 N This problem is important because it combines what we have learned about vectors with the new topic of forces. The general approach taken here is very powerful, and we will repeat it many times. Exercise Knowing that the knot is in equilibrium (a write 0) allows us to In what situation does T1 T2 ? Answer When the two cables attached to the support make equal angles with the horizontal. T3 37.0 T1 53.0 T2 37.0 T3 T1 y T2 53.0 x Fg (a) (b) (c) T3 Figure 5.11 (a) A traffic light suspended by cables. (b) Free-body diagram for the traffic light. (c) Free-body diagram for the knot where the three cables are joined. 126 CHAPTER 5 The Laws of Motion CONCEPTUAL EXAMPLE 5.5 Forces Between Cars in a Train the locomotive and the first car must apply enough force to accelerate all of the remaining cars. As you move back along the train, each coupler is accelerating less mass behind it. The last coupler has to accelerate only the caboose, and so it is under the least tension. When the brakes are applied, the force again decreases from front to back. The coupler connecting the locomotive to the first car must apply a large force to slow down all the remaining cars. The final coupler must apply a force large enough to slow down only the caboose. In a train, the cars are connected by couplers, which are under tension as the locomotive pulls the train. As you move down the train from locomotive to caboose, does the tension in the couplers increase, decrease, or stay the same as the train speeds up? When the engineer applies the brakes, the couplers are under compression. How does this compression force vary from locomotive to caboose? (Assume that only the brakes on the wheels of the engine are applied.) Solution As the train speeds up, the tension decreases from the front of the train to the back. The coupler between EXAMPLE 5.6 Crate on a Frictionless Incline place the force of gravity by a component of magnitude mg sin along the positive x axis and by one of magnitude mg cos along the negative y axis. Now we apply Newton's second law in component form, noting that ay 0: (1) (2) Fx Fy mg sin n mg cos ma x 0 A crate of mass m is placed on a frictionless inclined plane of angle . (a) Determine the acceleration of the crate after it is released. Solution Because we know the forces acting on the crate, we can use Newton's second law to determine its acceleration. (In other words, we have classified the problem; this gives us a hint as to the approach to take.) We make a sketch as in Figure 5.12a and then construct the free-body diagram for the crate, as shown in Figure 5.12b. The only forces acting on the crate are the normal force n exerted by the inclined plane, which acts perpendicular to the plane, and the force of gravity Fg mg, which acts vertically downward. For problems involving inclined planes, it is convenient to choose the coordinate axes with x downward along the incline and y perpendicular to it, as shown in Figure 5.12b. (It is possible to solve the problem with "standard" horizontal and vertical axes. You may want to try this, just for practice.) Then, we rey a n Solving (1) for ax , we see that the acceleration along the incline is caused by the component of Fg directed down the incline: (3) ax g sin Note that this acceleration component is independent of the mass of the crate! It depends only on the angle of inclination and on g. From (2) we conclude that the component of Fg perpendicular to the incline is balanced by the normal force; that is, n mg cos . This is one example of a situation in which the normal force is not equal in magnitude to the weight of the object. mg sin d mg cos mg x Special Cases Looking over our results, we see that in the extreme case of 90, ax g and n 0. This condition corresponds to the crate's being in free fall. When 0, ax 0 and n mg (its maximum value); in this case, the crate is sitting on a horizontal surface. (b) Suppose the crate is released from rest at the top of the incline, and the distance from the front edge of the crate to the bottom is d. How long does it take the front edge to reach the bottom, and what is its speed just as it gets there? (a) (b) Figure 5.12 (a) A crate of mass m sliding down a frictionless incline. (b) The free-body diagram for the crate. Note that its acceleration along the incline is g sin . Solution 2.11, x f Because ax constant, we can apply Equation x i v xi t 1a x t 2, to analyze the crate's motion. 2 5.7 With the displacement xf d (4) t 1 2 2 a xt Some Applications of Newton's Laws 127 xi d and vxi 0, we obtain (5) vxf 2a x d 2gd sin 2d ax v xi2 2d g sin 2a x(x f x i), with vxi 0, Using Equation 2.12, v xf 2 we find that vxf 2 2a xd We see from equations (4) and (5) that the time t needed to reach the bottom and the speed vxf , like acceleration, are independent of the crate's mass. This suggests a simple method you can use to measure g, using an inclined air track: Measure the angle of inclination, some distance traveled by a cart along the incline, and the time needed to travel that distance. The value of g can then be calculated from (4). EXAMPLE 5.7 One Block Pushes Another Treating the two blocks together as a system simplifies the solution but does not provide information about internal forces. (b) Determine the magnitude of the contact force between the two blocks. Two blocks of masses m1 and m 2 are placed in contact with each other on a frictionless horizontal surface. A constant horizontal force F is applied to the block of mass m1 . (a) Determine the magnitude of the acceleration of the two-block system. Solution Common sense tells us that both blocks must experience the same acceleration because they remain in contact with each other. Just as in the preceding example, we make a labeled sketch and free-body diagrams, which are shown in Figure 5.13. In Figure 5.13a the dashed line indicates that we treat the two blocks together as a system. Because F is the only external horizontal force acting on the system (the two blocks), we have F x(system) (1) ax F (m 1 F m1 m2 m 2)a x Solution To solve this part of the problem, we must treat each block separately with its own free-body diagram, as in Figures 5.13b and 5.13c. We denote the contact force by P. From Figure 5.13c, we see that the only horizontal force acting on block 2 is the contact force P (the force exerted by block 1 on block 2), which is directed to the right. Applying Newton's second law to block 2 gives (2) Fx P m 2a x Substituting into (2) the value of ax given by (1), we obtain (3) P m 2a x m2 m1 m2 F F m1 (a) n1 m2 y F x P P m2 m1g n2 m1 m 2g (c) (b) From this result, we see that the contact force P exerted by block 1 on block 2 is less than the applied force F. This is consistent with the fact that the force required to accelerate block 2 alone must be less than the force required to produce the same acceleration for the two-block system. It is instructive to check this expression for P by considering the forces acting on block 1, shown in Figure 5.13b. The horizontal forces acting on this block are the applied force F to the right and the contact force P to the left (the force exerted by block 2 on block 1). From Newton's third law, P is the reaction to P, so that P P . Applying Newton's second law to block 1 produces (4) Fx F P F P m 1a x Figure 5.13 128 CHAPTER 5 The Laws of Motion Substituting into (4) the value of ax from (1), we obtain P F m 1a x F m 1F m1 m 2 m2 m1 m2 F Exercise If m1 4.00 kg, m 2 3.00 kg, and F 9.00 N, find the magnitude of the acceleration of the system and the magnitude of the contact force. ax 1.29 m/s2; P 3.86 N. This agrees with (3), as it must. Answer EXAMPLE 5.8 Weighing a Fish in an Elevator If the elevator moves upward with an acceleration a relative to an observer standing outside the elevator in an inertial frame (see Fig. 5.14a), Newton's second law applied to the fish gives the net force on the fish: (1) Fy T mg ma y A person weighs a fish of mass m on a spring scale attached to the ceiling of an elevator, as illustrated in Figure 5.14. Show that if the elevator accelerates either upward or downward, the spring scale gives a reading that is different from the weight of the fish. Solution The external forces acting on the fish are the downward force of gravity Fg mg and the force T exerted by the scale. By Newton's third law, the tension T is also the reading of the scale. If the elevator is either at rest or moving at constant velocity, the fish is not accelerating, and so F y T mg 0 or T mg (remember that the scalar mg is the weight of the fish). a where we have chosen upward as the positive direction. Thus, we conclude from (1) that the scale reading T is greater than the weight mg if a is upward, so that ay is positive, and that the reading is less than mg if a is downward, so that ay is negative. For example, if the weight of the fish is 40.0 N and a is upward, so that ay 2.00 m/s2, the scale reading from (1) is a T T mg (a) (b) mg Observer in inertial frame Figure 5.14 Apparent weight versus true weight. (a) When the elevator accelerates upward, the spring scale reads a value greater than the weight of the fish. (b) When the elevator accelerates downward, the spring scale reads a value less than the weight of the fish. 5.7 ay g Some Applications of Newton's Laws 129 (2) T ma y mg mg 1 1 (40.0 N) 48.2 N If a is downward so that ay T mg ay g 1 2.00 m/s2 9.80 m/s2 Hence, if you buy a fish by weight in an elevator, make sure the fish is weighed while the elevator is either at rest or accelerating downward! Furthermore, note that from the information given here one cannot determine the direction of motion of the elevator. 2.00 m/s2, then (2) gives us (40.0 N) 2.00 m/s2 9.80 m/s2 1 31.8 N Special Cases If the elevator cable breaks, the elevator falls freely and ay g. We see from (2) that the scale reading T is zero in this case; that is, the fish appears to be weightless. If the elevator accelerates downward with an acceleration greater than g, the fish (along with the person in the elevator) eventually hits the ceiling because the acceleration of fish and person is still that of a freely falling object relative to an outside observer. EXAMPLE 5.9 Atwood's Machine vice is sometimes used in the laboratory to measure the freefall acceleration. Determine the magnitude of the acceleration of the two objects and the tension in the lightweight cord. When two objects of unequal mass are hung vertically over a frictionless pulley of negligible mass, as shown in Figure 5.15a, the arrangement is called an Atwood machine. The de- a m1 m2 a (a) T T m1 m2 m1g m2g (b) Solution If we were to define our system as being made up of both objects, as we did in Example 5.7, we would have to determine an internal force (tension in the cord). We must define two systems here -- one for each object -- and apply Newton's second law to each. The free-body diagrams for the two objects are shown in Figure 5.15b. Two forces act on each object: the upward force T exerted by the cord and the downward force of gravity. We need to be very careful with signs in problems such as this, in which a string or rope passes over a pulley or some other structure that causes the string or rope to bend. In Figure 5.15a, notice that if object 1 accelerates upward, then object 2 accelerates downward. Thus, for consistency with signs, if we define the upward direction as positive for object 1, we must define the downward direction as positive for object 2. With this sign convention, both objects accelerate in the same direction as defined by the choice of sign. With this sign convention applied to the forces, the y component of the net force exerted on object 1 is T m1g, and the y component of the net force exerted on object 2 is m 2g T. Because the objects are connected by a cord, their accelerations must be equal in magnitude. (Otherwise the cord would stretch or break as the distance between the objects increased.) If we assume m 2 m1 , then object 1 must accelerate upward and object 2 downward. When Newton's second law is applied to object 1, we obtain (1) Fy T m 1g m 1a y Similarly, for object 2 we find (2) Fy m 2g T m 2a y Figure 5.15 Atwood's machine. (a) Two objects (m 2 m1 ) connected by a cord of negligible mass strung over a frictionless pulley. (b) Free-body diagrams for the two objects. 130 CHAPTER 5 The Laws of Motion the ratio of the unbalanced force on the system (m 2g m 1g) to the total mass of the system (m 1 m 2), as expected from Newton's second law. When (2) is added to (1), T drops out and we get m 1g (3) m 2g ay m 1a y m2 m1 m 2a y m1 g m2 When (3) is substituted into (1), we obtain (4) T 2m 1m 2 g m1 m2 Special Cases When m 1 m 2 , then ay 0 and T m1 g, as we would expect for this balanced case. If m 2 m1 , then ay g (a freely falling body) and T 2m1 g. Exercise Find the magnitude of the acceleration and the string tension for an Atwood machine in which m1 2.00 kg and m 2 4.00 kg. ay 3.27 m/s2, T 26.1 N. The result for the acceleration in (3) can be interpreted as Answer EXAMPLE 5.10 Acceleration of Two Objects Connected by a Cord rection. Applying Newton's second law in component form to the block gives (3) (4) Fx Fy m 2g sin n m 2g cos T m 2a x 0 m 2a A ball of mass m1 and a block of mass m 2 are attached by a lightweight cord that passes over a frictionless pulley of negligible mass, as shown in Figure 5.16a. The block lies on a frictionless incline of angle . Find the magnitude of the acceleration of the two objects and the tension in the cord. Solution Because the objects are connected by a cord (which we assume does not stretch), their accelerations have the same magnitude. The free-body diagrams are shown in Figures 5.16b and 5.16c. Applying Newton's second law in component form to the ball, with the choice of the upward direction as positive, yields (1) (2) Fx Fy 0 T m 1g m 1a y m 1a In (3) we have replaced ax with a because that is the acceleration's only component. In other words, the two objects have accelerations of the same magnitude a, which is what we are trying to find. Equations (1) and (4) provide no information regarding the acceleration. However, if we solve (2) for T and then substitute this value for T into (3) and solve for a, we obtain m 2g sin m1 m 1g m2 (5) a Note that in order for the ball to accelerate upward, it is necessary that T m1 g. In (2) we have replaced ay with a because the acceleration has only a y component. For the block it is convenient to choose the positive x axis along the incline, as shown in Figure 5.16c. Here we choose the positive direction to be down the incline, in the x di- When this value for a is substituted into (2), we find 1) m 1m 2g(sin m1 m2 (6) T y y a m2 T T m1 x m 2g cos m 1g (b) m 2g (c) m2g sin n Figure 5.16 (a) Two objects connected by a lightweight cord strung over a frictionless pulley. (b) Free-body diagram for the ball. (c) Free-body diagram for the block. (The incline is frictionless.) a m1 x (a) 5.8 Note that the block accelerates down the incline only if m 2 sin m1 (that is, if a is in the direction we assumed). If m1 m 2 sin , then the acceleration is up the incline for the block and downward for the ball. Also note that the result for the acceleration (5) can be interpreted as the resultant force acting on the system divided by the total mass of the system; this is consistent with Newton's second law. Finally, if 90, then the results for a and T are identical to those of Example 5.9. Forces of Friction 5.00 kg, and 131 45.0, find Exercise If m1 10.0 kg, m 2 the acceleration of each object. a 4.22 m/s2, where the negative sign indicates that the block accelerates up the incline and the ball accelerates downward. Answer 5.8 FORCES OF FRICTION When a body is in motion either on a surface or in a viscous medium such as air or water, there is resistance to the motion because the body interacts with its surroundings. We call such resistance a force of friction. Forces of friction are very important in our everyday lives. They allow us to walk or run and are necessary for the motion of wheeled vehicles. Have you ever tried to move a heavy desk across a rough floor? You push harder and harder until all of a sudden the desk seems to "break free" and subsequently moves relatively easily. It takes a greater force to start the desk moving than it does to keep it going once it has started sliding. To understand why this happens, consider a book on a table, as shown in Figure 5.17a. If we apply an external horizontal force F to the book, acting to the right, the book remains stationary if F is not too great. The force that counteracts F and keeps the book from moving acts to the left and is called the frictional force f. As long as the book is not moving, f F. Because the book is stationary, we call this frictional force the force of static friction fs . Experiments show that this force arises from contacting points that protrude beyond the general level of the surfaces in contact, even for surfaces that are apparently very smooth, as shown in the magnified view in Figure 5.17a. (If the surfaces are clean and smooth at the atomic level, they are likely to weld together when contact is made.) The frictional force arises in part from one peak's physically blocking the motion of a peak from the opposing surface, and in part from chemical bonding of opposing points as they come into contact. If the surfaces are rough, bouncing is likely to occur, further complicating the analysis. Although the details of friction are quite complex at the atomic level, this force ultimately involves an electrical interaction between atoms or molecules. If we increase the magnitude of F, as shown in Figure 5.17b, the magnitude of fs increases along with it, keeping the book in place. The force fs cannot increase indefinitely, however. Eventually the surfaces in contact can no longer supply sufficient frictional force to counteract F, and the book accelerates. When it is on the verge of moving, fs is a maximum, as shown in Figure 5.17c. When F exceeds fs,max , the book accelerates to the right. Once the book is in motion, the retarding frictional force becomes less than fs,max (see Fig. 5.17c). When the book is in motion, we call the retarding force the force of kinetic friction fk . If F fk , then the book moves to the right with constant speed. If F fk , then there is an unbalanced force F fk in the positive x direction, and this force accelerates the book to the right. If the applied force F is removed, then the frictional force fk acting to the left accelerates the book in the negative x direction and eventually brings it to rest. Experimentally, we find that, to a good approximation, both fs,max and fk are proportional to the normal force acting on the book. The following empirical laws of friction summarize the experimental observations: Force of static friction Force of kinetic friction 132 CHAPTER 5 The Laws of Motion n n Motion fs F F fk mg (a) mg (b) |f| fs,max fs =F fk = kn 0 F Static region Kinetic region (c) Figure 5.17 The direction of the force of friction f between a book and a rough surface is opposite the direction of the applied force F. Because the two surfaces are both rough, contact is made only at a few points, as illustrated in the "magnified" view. (a) The magnitude of the force of static friction equals the magnitude of the applied force. (b) When the magnitude of the applied force exceeds the magnitude of the force of kinetic friction, the book accelerates to the right. (c) A graph of frictional force versus applied force. Note that fs,max fk . The direction of the force of static friction between any two surfaces in contact with each other is opposite the direction of relative motion and can have values fs sn (5.8) where the dimensionless constant s is called the coefficient of static friction and n is the magnitude of the normal force. The equality in Equation 5.8 holds when one object is on the verge of moving, that is, when fs fs,max s n. The inequality holds when the applied force is less than s n. The direction of the force of kinetic friction acting on an object is opposite the direction of the object's sliding motion relative to the surface applying the frictional force and is given by (5.9) fk kn The values of is the coefficient of kinetic friction. k and s depend on the nature of the surfaces, but k is generally less than s . Typical values range from around 0.03 to 1.0. Table 5.2 lists some reported values. where k 5.8 Forces of Friction 133 TABLE 5.2 Coefficients of Frictiona s k Steel on steel Aluminum on steel Copper on steel Rubber on concrete Wood on wood Glass on glass Waxed wood on wet snow Waxed wood on dry snow Metal on metal (lubricated) Ice on ice Teflon on Teflon Synovial joints in humans a 0.74 0.61 0.53 1.0 0.25 0.5 0.94 0.14 -- 0.15 0.1 0.04 0.01 0.57 0.47 0.36 0.8 0.2 0.4 0.1 0.04 0.06 0.03 0.04 0.003 All values are approximate. In some cases, the coefficient of friction can exceed 1.0. The coefficients of friction are nearly independent of the area of contact be- tween the surfaces. To understand why, we must examine the difference between the apparent contact area, which is the area we see with our eyes, and the real contact area, represented by two irregular surfaces touching, as shown in the magnified view in Figure 5.17a. It seems that increasing the apparent contact area does not increase the real contact area. When we increase the apparent area (without changing anything else), there is less force per unit area driving the jagged points together. This decrease in force counteracts the effect of having more points involved. Although the coefficient of kinetic friction can vary with speed, we shall usually neglect any such variations in this text. We can easily demonstrate the approximate nature of the equations by trying to get a block to slip down an incline at constant speed. Especially at low speeds, the motion is likely to be characterized by alternate episodes of sticking and movement. If you would like to learn more about this subject, read the article "Friction at the Atomic Scale" by J. Krim in the October 1996 issue of Scientific American. QuickLab Can you apply the ideas of Example 5.12 to determine the coefficients of static and kinetic friction between the cover of your book and a quarter? What should happen to those coefficients if you make the measurements between your book and two quarters taped one on top of the other? Quick Quiz 5.6 A crate is sitting in the center of a flatbed truck. The truck accelerates to the right, and the crate moves with it, not sliding at all. What is the direction of the frictional force exerted by the truck on the crate? (a) To the left. (b) To the right. (c) No frictional force because the crate is not sliding. CONCEPTUAL EXAMPLE 5.11 Why Does the Sled Accelerate? A horse pulls a sled along a level, snow-covered road, causing the sled to accelerate, as shown in Figure 5.18a. Newton's third law states that the sled exerts an equal and opposite force on the horse. In view of this, how can the sled accelerate? Under what condition does the system (horse plus sled) move with constant velocity? Solution It is important to remember that the forces described in Newton's third law act on different objects -- the horse exerts a force on the sled, and the sled exerts an equalmagnitude and oppositely directed force on the horse. Because we are interested only in the motion of the sled, we do not consider the forces it exerts on the horse. When deter- 134 CHAPTER 5 The Laws of Motion T T fsled (a) fhorse (b) (c) Figure 5.18 mining the motion of an object, you must add only the forces on that object. The horizontal forces exerted on the sled are the forward force T exerted by the horse and the backward force of friction fsled between sled and snow (see Fig. 5.18b). When the forward force exceeds the backward force, the sled accelerates to the right. The force that accelerates the system (horse plus sled) is the frictional force fhorse exerted by the Earth on the horse's feet. The horizontal forces exerted on the horse are the forward force fhorse exerted by the Earth and the backward tension force T exerted by the sled (Fig. 5.18c). The resultant of these two forces causes the horse to accelerate. When fhorse balances fsled , the system moves with constant velocity. Exercise Are the normal force exerted by the snow on the horse and the gravitational force exerted by the Earth on the horse a third-law pair? Answer No, because they act on the same object. Third-law force pairs are equal in magnitude and opposite in direction, and the forces act on different objects. EXAMPLE 5.12 Experimental Determination of s and k The following is a simple method of measuring coefficients of friction: Suppose a block is placed on a rough surface inclined relative to the horizontal, as shown in Figure 5.19. The incline angle is increased until the block starts to move. Let us show that by measuring the critical angle c at which this slipping just occurs, we can obtain s . The only forces acting on the block are the force of gravity mg, the normal force n, and the force of static friction fs . These forces balance when the block is on the verge of slipping but has not yet moved. When we take x to be parallel to the plane and y perpendicular to it, Newton's second law applied to the block for this balanced situation gives Static case: (1) (2) Fx Fy mg sin n mg cos fs ma x ma y n/cos 0 0 from Solution We can eliminate mg by substituting mg (2) into (1) to get (3) fs mg sin n cos sin n tan y n f x When the incline is at the critical angle c , we know that fs fs,max s n, and so at this angle, (3) becomes sn n tan s c c Static case: mg sin mg cos tan mg Figure 5.19 The external forces exerted on a block lying on a rough incline are the force of gravity mg, the normal force n, and the force of friction f. For convenience, the force of gravity is resolved into a component along the incline mg sin and a component perpendicular to the incline mg cos . For example, if the block just slips at c 20, then we find that s tan 20 0.364. Once the block starts to move at c , it accelerates down the incline and the force of friction is fk k n. However, if is reduced to a value less than c , it may be possible to find an angle c such that the block moves down the incline with constant speed (ax 0). In this case, using (1) and (2) with fs replaced by fk gives Kinetic case: where c c. k tan c 5.8 Forces of Friction 135 EXAMPLE 5.13 The Sliding Hockey Puck Defining rightward and upward as our positive directions, we apply Newton's second law in component form to the puck and obtain (1) (2) Fx Fy n fk mg ma x 0 (a y 0) mg. Therefore, A hockey puck on a frozen pond is given an initial speed of 20.0 m/s. If the puck always remains on the ice and slides 115 m before coming to rest, determine the coefficient of kinetic friction between the puck and ice. Solution The forces acting on the puck after it is in motion are shown in Figure 5.20. If we assume that the force of kinetic friction fk remains constant, then this force produces a uniform acceleration of the puck in the direction opposite its velocity, causing the puck to slow down. First, we find this acceleration in terms of the coefficient of kinetic friction, using Newton's second law. Knowing the acceleration of the puck and the distance it travels, we can then use the equations of kinematics to find the coefficient of kinetic friction. n Motion But fk k n, and from (2) we see that n (1) becomes kn kmg kg ma x ax The negative sign means the acceleration is to the left; this means that the puck is slowing down. The acceleration is independent of the mass of the puck and is constant because we assume that k remains constant. Because the acceleration is constant, we can use Equation 2.12, v xf 2 v xi2 2a x(x f x i), with xi 0 and vxf 0: v xi2 2ax f k v xi2 v xi 2gx f 2 2 k gx f 0 fk mg k (20.0 m/s)2 2(9.80 m/s2)(115 m) 0.177 Figure 5.20 After the puck is given an initial velocity to the right, the only external forces acting on it are the force of gravity mg, the normal force n, and the force of kinetic friction fk . Note that k is dimensionless. EXAMPLE 5.14 Acceleration of Two Connected Objects When Friction Is Present Motion of block: (1) (2) Motion of ball: (3) Fx Fy Fx Fy F cos m 1a n m 1a y m 2a x T F sin 0 0 m 2g m 2a y m 2a m 1g fk T m 1a x A block of mass m1 on a rough, horizontal surface is connected to a ball of mass m 2 by a lightweight cord over a lightweight, frictionless pulley, as shown in Figure 5.21a. A force of magnitude F at an angle with the horizontal is applied to the block as shown. The coefficient of kinetic friction between the block and surface is k . Determine the magnitude of the acceleration of the two objects. We start by drawing free-body diagrams for the two objects, as shown in Figures 5.21b and 5.21c. (Are you beginning to see the similarities in all these examples?) Next, we apply Newton's second law in component form to each object and use Equation 5.9, f k kn. Then we can solve for the acceleration in terms of the parameters given. The applied force F has x and y components F cos and F sin , respectively. Applying Newton's second law to both objects and assuming the motion of the block is to the right, we obtain Solution Note that because the two objects are connected, we can equate the magnitudes of the x component of the acceleration of the block and the y component of the acceleration of the ball. From Equation 5.9 we know that fk k n, and from (2) we know that n m1 g F sin (note that in this case n is not equal to m1 g); therefore, (4) fk k(m 1g F sin ) That is, the frictional force is reduced because of the positive 136 CHAPTER 5 The Laws of Motion Note that the acceleration of the block can be either to the right or to the left,6 depending on the sign of the numerator in (5). If the motion is to the left, then we must reverse the sign of fk in (1) because the force of kinetic friction must oppose the motion. In this case, the value of a is the same as in (5), with k replaced by k. y component of F. Substituting (4) and the value of T from (3) into (1) gives F cos k(m 1g F sin ) m 2(a g) m 1a Solving for a, we obtain F(cos sin ) g(m 2 m1 m2 km 1) (5) a k y a m1 n F x T T fk F sin F F cos m2 m 1g (c) a m2 (a) m 2g (b) Figure 5.21 (a) The external force F applied as shown can cause the block to accelerate to the right. (b) and (c) The free-body diagrams, under the assumption that the block accelerates to the right and the ball accelerates upward. The magnitude of the force of kinetic friction in this case is given by fk F sin ). kn k(m1g APPLICATION Automobile Antilock Braking Systems (ABS) have developed antilock braking systems (ABS) that very briefly release the brakes when a wheel is just about to stop turning. This maintains rolling contact between the tire and the pavement. When the brakes are released momentarily, the stopping distance is greater than it would be if the brakes were being applied continuously. However, through the use of computer control, the "brake-off " time is kept to a minimum. As a result, the stopping distance is much less than what it would be if the wheels were to skid. Let us model the stopping of a car by examining real data. In a recent issue of AutoWeek,7 the braking performance for a Toyota Corolla was measured. These data correspond to the braking force acquired by a highly trained, professional driver. We begin by assuming constant acceleration. (Why do we need to make this assumption?) The magazine provided the initial speed and stopping distance in non-SI units. After converting these values to SI we use v xf 2 v xi2 2a x x to deterkm 1 If an automobile tire is rolling and not slipping on a road surface, then the maximum frictional force that the road can exert on the tire is the force of static friction s n. One must use static friction in this situation because at the point of contact between the tire and the road, no sliding of one surface over the other occurs if the tire is not skidding. However, if the tire starts to skid, the frictional force exerted on it is reduced to the force of kinetic friction k n. Thus, to maximize the frictional force and minimize stopping distance, the wheels must maintain pure rolling motion and not skid. An additional benefit of maintaining wheel rotation is that directional control is not lost as it is in skidding. Unfortunately, in emergency situations drivers typically press down as hard as they can on the brake pedal, "locking the brakes." This stops the wheels from rotating, ensuring a skid and reducing the frictional force from the static to the kinetic case. To address this problem, automotive engineers 6 Equation 5 shows that when a given angle . 7 m 2 , there is a range of values of F for which no motion occurs at AutoWeek magazine, 48:22 23, 1998. Summary mine the acceleration at different speeds. These do not vary greatly, and so our assumption of constant acceleration is reasonable. Initial Speed (mi/h) Stopping Distance no skid (m) 137 Stopping distance skidding (m) Initial Speed (mi/h) (m/s) Stopping Distance (ft) (m) Acceleration (m/s2) 30 60 80 10.4 43.6 76.5 13.9 55.5 98.9 30 60 80 13.4 26.8 35.8 34 143 251 10.4 43.6 76.5 8.67 8.25 8.36 We take an average value of acceleration of 8.4 m/s2, which is approximately 0.86g. We then calculate the coefficient of friction from F ma; this gives s 0.86 for s mg the Toyota. This is lower than the rubber-to-concrete value given in Table 5.2. Can you think of any reasons for this? Let us now estimate the stopping distance of the car if the wheels were skidding. Examining Table 5.2 again, we see that the difference between the coefficients of static and kinetic friction for rubber against concrete is about 0.2. Let us therefore assume that our coefficients differ by the same amount, so that k 0.66. This allows us to calculate estimated stopping distances for the case in which the wheels are locked and the car skids across the pavement. The results illustrate the advantage of not allowing the wheels to skid. An ABS keeps the wheels rotating, with the result that the higher coefficient of static friction is maintained between the tires and road. This approximates the technique of a professional driver who is able to maintain the wheels at the point of maximum frictional force. Let us estimate the ABS performance by assuming that the magnitude of the acceleration is not quite as good as that achieved by the professional driver but instead is reduced by 5%. We now plot in Figure 5.22 vehicle speed versus distance from where the brakes were applied (at an initial speed of 80 mi/h 37.5 m/s) for the three cases of amateur driver, professional driver, and estimated ABS performance (amateur driver). We find that a markedly shorter distance is necessary for stopping without locking the wheels and skidding and a satisfactory value of stopping distance when the ABS computer maintains tire rotation. The purpose of the ABS is to help typical drivers (whose tendency is to lock the wheels in an emergency) to better maintain control of their automobiles and minimize stopping distance. Speed (m/s) 40 20 Amateur driver Professional driver ABS, amateur driver 0 0 50 100 Distance from point of application of brakes (m) Figure 5.22 This plot of vehicle speed versus distance from where the brakes were applied shows that an antilock braking system (ABS) approaches the performance of a trained professional driver. SUMMARY Newton's first law states that, in the absence of an external force, a body at rest remains at rest and a body in uniform motion in a straight line maintains that motion. An inertial frame is one that is not accelerating. Newton's second law states that the acceleration of an object is directly proportional to the net force acting on it and inversely proportional to its mass. The net force acting on an object equals the product of its mass and its acceleration: F ma. You should be able to apply the x and y component forms of this equation to describe the acceleration of any object acting under the influence of speci- 138 CHAPTER 5 The Laws of Motion n m f F A block pulled to the right on a rough horizontal surface Fg n m F A block pulled up a rough incline f Fg n1 F F m1 m2 Fg 1 Two blocks in contact, pushed to the right on a frictionless surface m1 P P n2 m2 Fg 2 Note: P = P because they are an actionreaction pair . T n m1 m1 f m2 T m2 Fg 1 Fg 2 Two masses connected by a light cord. The surface is rough, and the pulley is frictionless. Figure 5.23 Various systems (left) and the corresponding free-body diagrams (right). Questions 139 fied forces. If the object is either stationary or moving with constant velocity, then the forces must vectorially cancel each other. The force of gravity exerted on an object is equal to the product of its mass (a scalar quantity) and the free-fall acceleration: Fg mg. The weight of an object is the magnitude of the force of gravity acting on the object. Newton's third law states that if two objects interact, then the force exerted by object 1 on object 2 is equal in magnitude and opposite in direction to the force exerted by object 2 on object 1. Thus, an isolated force cannot exist in nature. Make sure you can identify third-law pairs and the two objects upon which they act. The maximum force of static friction fs,max between an object and a surface is proportional to the normal force acting on the object. In general, fs s n, where s is the coefficient of static friction and n is the magnitude of the normal force. When an object slides over a surface, the direction of the force of kinetic friction fk is opposite the direction of sliding motion and is also proportional to the magnitude of the normal force. The magnitude of this force is given by fk k n, where k is the coefficient of kinetic friction. More on Free-Body Diagrams To be successful in applying Newton's second law to a system, you must be able to recognize all the forces acting on the system. That is, you must be able to construct the correct free-body diagram. The importance of constructing the free-body diagram cannot be overemphasized. In Figure 5.23 a number of systems are presented together with their free-body diagrams. You should examine these carefully and then construct free-body diagrams for other systems described in the end-ofchapter problems. When a system contains more than one element, it is important that you construct a separate free-body diagram for each element. As usual, F denotes some applied force, Fg mg is the force of gravity, n denotes a normal force, f is the force of friction, and T is the force whose magnitude is the tension exerted on an object. QUESTIONS 1. A passenger sitting in the rear of a bus claims that he was injured when the driver slammed on the brakes, causing a suitcase to come flying toward the passenger from the front of the bus. If you were the judge in this case, what disposition would you make? Why? 2. A space explorer is in a spaceship moving through space far from any planet or star. She notices a large rock, taken as a specimen from an alien planet, floating around the cabin of the spaceship. Should she push it gently toward a storage compartment or kick it toward the compartment? Why? 3. A massive metal object on a rough metal surface may undergo contact welding to that surface. Discuss how this affects the frictional force between object and surface. 4. The observer in the elevator of Example 5.8 would claim that the weight of the fish is T, the scale reading. This claim is obviously wrong. Why does this observation differ from that of a person in an inertial frame outside the elevator? 5. Identify the action reaction pairs in the following situations: a man takes a step; a snowball hits a woman in the back; a baseball player catches a ball; a gust of wind strikes a window. A ball is held in a person's hand. (a) Identify all the external forces acting on the ball and the reaction to each. (b) If the ball is dropped, what force is exerted on it while it is falling? Identify the reaction force in this case. (Neglect air resistance.) If a car is traveling westward with a constant speed of 20 m/s, what is the resultant force acting on it? "When the locomotive in Figure 5.3 broke through the wall of the train station, the force exerted by the locomotive on the wall was greater than the force the wall could exert on the locomotive." Is this statement true or in need of correction? Explain your answer. A rubber ball is dropped onto the floor. What force causes the ball to bounce? What is wrong with the statement, "Because the car is at rest, no forces are acting on it"? How would you correct this statement? 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 140 CHAPTER 5 The Laws of Motion rope being tugged is gradually accelerating toward the Freshman team. State the relationship between the strengths of these two forces: First, the force the Freshmen exert on the Sophomores; and second, the force the Sophomores exert on the Freshmen. If you push on a heavy box that is at rest, you must exert some force to start its motion. However, once the box is sliding, you can apply a smaller force to maintain that motion. Why? A weight lifter stands on a bathroom scale. He pumps a barbell up and down. What happens to the reading on the scale as this is done? Suppose he is strong enough to actually throw the barbell upward. How does the reading on the scale vary now? As a rocket is fired from a launching pad, its speed and acceleration increase with time as its engines continue to operate. Explain why this occurs even though the force of the engines exerted on the rocket remains constant. In the motion picture It Happened One Night (Columbia Pictures, 1934), Clark Gable is standing inside a stationary bus in front of Claudette Colbert, who is seated. The bus suddenly starts moving forward, and Clark falls into Claudette's lap. Why did this happen? 11. Suppose you are driving a car along a highway at a high speed. Why should you avoid slamming on your brakes if you want to stop in the shortest distance? That is, why should you keep the wheels turning as you brake? 12. If you have ever taken a ride in an elevator of a high-rise building, you may have experienced a nauseating sensation of "heaviness" and "lightness" depending on the direction of the acceleration. Explain these sensations. Are we truly weightless in free-fall? 13. The driver of a speeding empty truck slams on the brakes and skids to a stop through a distance d. (a) If the truck carried a heavy load such that its mass were doubled, what would be its skidding distance? (b) If the initial speed of the truck is halved, what would be its skidding distance? 14. In an attempt to define Newton's third law, a student states that the action and reaction forces are equal in magnitude and opposite in direction to each other. If this is the case, how can there ever be a net force on an object? 15. What force causes (a) a propeller-driven airplane to move? (b) a rocket? (c) a person walking? 16. Suppose a large and spirited Freshman team is beating the Sophomores in a tug-of-war contest. The center of the 17. 18. 19. 20. PROBLEMS 1, 2, 3 = straightforward, intermediate, challenging = full solution available in the Student Solutions Manual and Study Guide WEB = solution posted at http://www.saunderscollege.com/physics/ = Computer useful in solving problem = Interactive Physics = paired numerical/symbolic problems Sections 5.1 through 5.6 1. A force F applied to an object of mass m1 produces an acceleration of 3.00 m/s2. The same force applied to a second object of mass m 2 produces an acceleration of 1.00 m/s2. (a) What is the value of the ratio m1 /m 2 ? (b) If m1 and m 2 are combined, find their acceleration under the action of the force F. 2. A force of 10.0 N acts on a body of mass 2.00 kg. What are (a) the body's acceleration, (b) its weight in newtons, and (c) its acceleration if the force is doubled? 3. A 3.00-kg mass undergoes an acceleration given by a (2.00i 5.00j) m/s2. Find the resultant force F and its magnitude. 4. A heavy freight train has a mass of 15 000 metric tons. If the locomotive can pull with a force of 750 000 N, how long does it take to increase the speed from 0 to 80.0 km/h? 5. A 5.00-g bullet leaves the muzzle of a rifle with a speed of 320 m/s. The expanding gases behind it exert what force on the bullet while it is traveling down the barrel of the rifle, 0.820 m long? Assume constant acceleration and negligible friction. 6. After uniformly accelerating his arm for 0.090 0 s, a pitcher releases a baseball of weight 1.40 N with a veloc- ity of 32.0 m/s horizontally forward. If the ball starts from rest, (a) through what distance does the ball accelerate before its release? (b) What force does the pitcher exert on the ball? 7. After uniformly accelerating his arm for a time t, a pitcher releases a baseball of weight Fg j with a velocity vi. If the ball starts from rest, (a) through what distance does the ball accelerate before its release? (b) What force does the pitcher exert on the ball? 8. Define one pound as the weight of an object of mass 0.453 592 37 kg at a location where the acceleration due to gravity is 32.174 0 ft/s2. Express the pound as one quantity with one SI unit. WEB 9. A 4.00-kg object has a velocity of 3.00i m/s at one instant. Eight seconds later, its velocity has increased to (8.00i 10.0j) m/s. Assuming the object was subject to a constant total force, find (a) the components of the force and (b) its magnitude. 10. The average speed of a nitrogen molecule in air is about 6.70 102 m/s, and its mass is 4.68 10 26 kg. (a) If it takes 3.00 10 13 s for a nitrogen molecule to hit a wall and rebound with the same speed but moving in the opposite direction, what is the average acceleration of the molecule during this time interval? (b) What average force does the molecule exert on the wall? Problems 11. An electron of mass 9.11 10 31 kg has an initial speed of 3.00 105 m/s. It travels in a straight line, and its speed increases to 7.00 105 m/s in a distance of 5.00 cm. Assuming its acceleration is constant, (a) determine the force exerted on the electron and (b) compare this force with the weight of the electron, which we neglected. 12. A woman weighs 120 lb. Determine (a) her weight in newtons and (b) her mass in kilograms. 13. If a man weighs 900 N on the Earth, what would he weigh on Jupiter, where the acceleration due to gravity is 25.9 m/s2? 14. The distinction between mass and weight was discovered after Jean Richer transported pendulum clocks from Paris to French Guiana in 1671. He found that they ran slower there quite systematically. The effect was reversed when the clocks returned to Paris. How much weight would you personally lose in traveling from Paris, where g 9.809 5 m/s2, to Cayenne, where g 9.780 8 m/s2 ? (We shall consider how the free-fall acceleration influences the period of a pendulum in Section 13.4.) 15. Two forces F1 and F2 act on a 5.00-kg mass. If F1 20.0 N and F2 15.0 N, find the accelerations in (a) and (b) of Figure P5.15. F2 F2 141 ation of the 1 000-kg boat? (b) If it starts from rest, how far will it move in 10.0 s? (c) What will be its speed at the end of this time? 20. Three forces, given by F1 ( 2.00i 2.00j) N, F2 (5.00i 3.00j) N, and F3 ( 45.0i) N, act on an object to give it an acceleration of magnitude 3.75 m/s2. (a) What is the direction of the acceleration? (b) What is the mass of the object? (c) If the object is initially at rest, what is its speed after 10.0 s? (d) What are the velocity components of the object after 10.0 s? 21. A 15.0-lb block rests on the floor. (a) What force does the floor exert on the block? (b) If a rope is tied to the block and run vertically over a pulley, and the other end is attached to a free-hanging 10.0-lb weight, what is the force exerted by the floor on the 15.0-lb block? (c) If we replace the 10.0-lb weight in part (b) with a 20.0-lb weight, what is the force exerted by the floor on the 15.0-lb block? Section 5.7 Some Applications of Newton's Laws 22. A 3.00-kg mass is moving in a plane, with its x and y coordinates given by x 5t 2 1 and y 3t 3 2, where x and y are in meters and t is in seconds. Find the magnitude of the net force acting on this mass at t 2.00 s. 23. The distance between two telephone poles is 50.0 m. When a 1.00-kg bird lands on the telephone wire midway between the poles, the wire sags 0.200 m. Draw a free-body diagram of the bird. How much tension does the bird produce in the wire? Ignore the weight of the wire. 24. A bag of cement of weight 325 N hangs from three wires as shown in Figure P5.24. Two of the wires make angles 1 60.0 and 2 25.0 with the horizontal. If the system is in equilibrium, find the tensions T1 , T2 , and T3 in the wires. 90.0 m (a) F1 m 60.0 F1 (b) Figure P5.15 16. Besides its weight, a 2.80-kg object is subjected to one other constant force. The object starts from rest and in 1.20 s experiences a displacement of (4.20 m)i (3.30 m)j, where the direction of j is the upward vertical direction. Determine the other force. 17. You stand on the seat of a chair and then hop off. (a) During the time you are in flight down to the floor, the Earth is lurching up toward you with an acceleration of what order of magnitude? In your solution explain your logic. Visualize the Earth as a perfectly solid object. (b) The Earth moves up through a distance of what order of magnitude? 18. Forces of 10.0 N north, 20.0 N east, and 15.0 N south are simultaneously applied to a 4.00-kg mass as it rests on an air table. Obtain the object's acceleration. 19. A boat moves through the water with two horizontal forces acting on it. One is a 2000-N forward push caused by the motor; the other is a constant 1800-N resistive force caused by the water. (a) What is the acceler- 1 T1 2 T2 T3 Figure P5.24 Problems 24 and 25. 142 CHAPTER 5 The Laws of Motion 25. A bag of cement of weight Fg hangs from three wires as shown in Figure P5.24. Two of the wires make angles 1 and 2 with the horizontal. If the system is in equilibrium, show that the tension in the left-hand wire is T1 Fg cos 2/sin( 1 2) 26. You are a judge in a children's kite-flying contest, and two children will win prizes for the kites that pull most strongly and least strongly on their strings. To measure string tensions, you borrow a weight hanger, some slotted weights, and a protractor from your physics teacher and use the following protocol, illustrated in Figure P5.26: Wait for a child to get her kite well-controlled, hook the hanger onto the kite string about 30 cm from her hand, pile on weights until that section of string is horizontal, record the mass required, and record the angle between the horizontal and the string running up to the kite. (a) Explain how this method works. As you construct your explanation, imagine that the children's parents ask you about your method, that they might make false assumptions about your ability without concrete evidence, and that your explanation is an opportunity to give them confidence in your evaluation technique. (b) Find the string tension if the mass required to make the string horizontal is 132 g and the angle of the kite string is 46.3. 5.00 kg (a) 5.00 kg 5.00 kg 30.0 5.00 kg (b) 5.00 kg (c) Figure P5.27 turns to the fire at the same speed with the bucket now making an angle of 7.00 with the vertical. What is the mass of the water in the bucket? 29. A 1.00-kg mass is observed to accelerate at 10.0 m/s2 in a direction 30.0 north of east (Fig. P5.29). The force F2 acting on the mass has a magnitude of 5.00 N and is directed north. Determine the magnitude and direction of the force F1 acting on the mass. WEB F2 a= 10 . / 0m s2 30.0 Figure P5.26 27. The systems shown in Figure P5.27 are in equilibrium. If the spring scales are calibrated in newtons, what do they read? (Neglect the masses of the pulleys and strings, and assume the incline is frictionless.) 28. A fire helicopter carries a 620-kg bucket of water at the end of a cable 20.0 m long. As the aircraft flies back from a fire at a constant speed of 40.0 m/s, the cable makes an angle of 40.0 with respect to the vertical. (a) Determine the force of air resistance on the bucket. (b) After filling the bucket with sea water, the pilot re- 1.00 kg F1 Figure P5.29 30. A simple accelerometer is constructed by suspending a mass m from a string of length L that is tied to the top of a cart. As the cart is accelerated the string-mass system makes a constant angle with the vertical. (a) Assuming that the string mass is negligible compared with m, derive an expression for the cart's acceleration in terms of and show that it is independent of Problems the mass m and the length L. (b) Determine the acceleration of the cart when 23.0. 31. Two people pull as hard as they can on ropes attached to a boat that has a mass of 200 kg. If they pull in the same direction, the boat has an acceleration of 1.52 m/s2 to the right. If they pull in opposite directions, the boat has an acceleration of 0.518 m/s2 to the left. What is the force exerted by each person on the boat? (Disregard any other forces on the boat.) 32. Draw a free-body diagram for a block that slides down a frictionless plane having an inclination of 15.0 (Fig. P5.32). If the block starts from rest at the top and the length of the incline is 2.00 m, find (a) the acceleration of the block and (b) its speed when it reaches the bottom of the incline. 143 35. Two masses m1 and m 2 situated on a frictionless, horizontal surface are connected by a light string. A force F is exerted on one of the masses to the right (Fig. P5.35). Determine the acceleration of the system and the tension T in the string. T m2 m1 F Figure P5.35 Problems 35 and 51. Figure P5.32 36. Two masses of 3.00 kg and 5.00 kg are connected by a light string that passes over a frictionless pulley, as was shown in Figure 5.15a. Determine (a) the tension in the string, (b) the acceleration of each mass, and (c) the distance each mass will move in the first second of motion if they start from rest. 37. In the system shown in Figure P5.37, a horizontal force Fx acts on the 8.00-kg mass. The horizontal surface is frictionless.(a) For what values of Fx does the 2.00-kg mass accelerate upward? (b) For what values of Fx is the tension in the cord zero? (c) Plot the acceleration of the 8.00-kg mass versus Fx . Include values of Fx from 100 N to 100 N. ax WEB 33. A block is given an initial velocity of 5.00 m/s up a frictionless 20.0 incline. How far up the incline does the block slide before coming to rest? 34. Two masses are connected by a light string that passes over a frictionless pulley, as in Figure P5.34. If the incline is frictionless and if m1 2.00 kg, m 2 6.00 kg, and 55.0, find (a) the accelerations of the masses, (b) the tension in the string, and (c) the speed of each mass 2.00 s after being released from rest. 8.00 kg Fx 2.00 kg Figure P5.37 38. Mass m1 on a frictionless horizontal table is connected to mass m 2 by means of a very light pulley P1 and a light fixed pulley P2 as shown in Figure P5.38. (a) If a1 and a2 P1 m1 m2 P2 m1 m2 Figure P5.34 Figure P5.38 144 CHAPTER 5 The Laws of Motion are the accelerations of m1 and m 2 , respectively, what is the relationship between these accelerations? Express (b) the tensions in the strings and (c) the accelerations a1 and a2 in terms of the masses m1 and m 2 and g. 39. A 72.0-kg man stands on a spring scale in an elevator. Starting from rest, the elevator ascends, attaining its maximum speed of 1.20 m/s in 0.800 s. It travels with this constant speed for the next 5.00 s. The elevator then undergoes a uniform acceleration in the negative y direction for 1.50 s and comes to rest. What does the spring scale register (a) before the elevator starts to move? (b) during the first 0.800 s? (c) while the elevator is traveling at constant speed? (d) during the time it is slowing down? Section 5.8 Forces of Friction Figure P5.44 WEB 40. The coefficient of static friction is 0.800 between the soles of a sprinter's running shoes and the level track surface on which she is running. Determine the maximum acceleration she can achieve. Do you need to know that her mass is 60.0 kg? 41. A 25.0-kg block is initially at rest on a horizontal surface. A horizontal force of 75.0 N is required to set the block in motion. After it is in motion, a horizontal force of 60.0 N is required to keep the block moving with constant speed. Find the coefficients of static and kinetic friction from this information. 42. A racing car accelerates uniformly from 0 to 80.0 mi/h in 8.00 s. The external force that accelerates the car is the frictional force between the tires and the road. If the tires do not slip, determine the minimum coefficient of friction between the tires and the road. 43. A car is traveling at 50.0 mi/h on a horizontal highway. (a) If the coefficient of friction between road and tires on a rainy day is 0.100, what is the minimum distance in which the car will stop? (b) What is the stopping distance when the surface is dry and s 0.600? 44. A woman at an airport is towing her 20.0-kg suitcase at constant speed by pulling on a strap at an angle of above the horizontal (Fig. P5.44). She pulls on the strap with a 35.0-N force, and the frictional force on the suitcase is 20.0 N. Draw a free-body diagram for the suitcase. (a) What angle does the strap make with the horizontal? (b) What normal force does the ground exert on the suitcase? 45. A 3.00-kg block starts from rest at the top of a 30.0 incline and slides a distance of 2.00 m down the incline in 1.50 s. Find (a) the magnitude of the acceleration of the block, (b) the coefficient of kinetic friction between block and plane, (c) the frictional force acting on the block, and (d) the speed of the block after it has slid 2.00 m. 46. To determine the coefficients of friction between rubber and various surfaces, a student uses a rubber eraser and an incline. In one experiment the eraser begins to slip down the incline when the angle of inclination is 36.0 and then moves down the incline with constant speed when the angle is reduced to 30.0. From these data, determine the coefficients of static and kinetic friction for this experiment. 47. A boy drags his 60.0-N sled at constant speed up a 15.0 hill. He does so by pulling with a 25.0-N force on a rope attached to the sled. If the rope is inclined at 35.0 to the horizontal, (a) what is the coefficient of kinetic friction between sled and snow? (b) At the top of the hill, he jumps on the sled and slides down the hill. What is the magnitude of his acceleration down the slope? 48. Determine the stopping distance for a skier moving down a slope with friction with an initial speed of 20.0 m/s (Fig. P5.48). Assume k 0.180 and 5.00. n f x mg Figure P5.48 49. A 9.00-kg hanging weight is connected by a string over a pulley to a 5.00-kg block that is sliding on a flat table (Fig. P5.49). If the coefficient of kinetic friction is 0.200, find the tension in the string. 50. Three blocks are connected on a table as shown in Figure P5.50. The table is rough and has a coefficient of ki- Problems 5.00 kg 145 T 9.00 kg Figure P5.49 M x 1.00 kg Figure P5.52 4.00 kg 2.00 kg 50.0 P Figure P5.53 Figure P5.50 ADDITIONAL PROBLEMS 54. A time-dependent force F (8.00i 4.00t j) N (where t is in seconds) is applied to a 2.00-kg object initially at rest. (a) At what time will the object be moving with a speed of 15.0 m/s? (b) How far is the object from its initial position when its speed is 15.0 m/s? (c) What is the object's displacement at the time calculated in (a)? 55. An inventive child named Pat wants to reach an apple in a tree without climbing the tree. Sitting in a chair connected to a rope that passes over a frictionless pulley (Fig. P5.55), Pat pulls on the loose end of the rope with such a force that the spring scale reads 250 N. Pat's weight is 320 N, and the chair weighs 160 N. (a) Draw free-body diagrams for Pat and the chair considered as separate systems, and draw another diagram for Pat and the chair considered as one system. (b) Show that the acceleration of the system is upward and find its magnitude. (c) Find the force Pat exerts on the chair. 56. Three blocks are in contact with each other on a frictionless, horizontal surface, as in Figure P5.56. A horizontal force F is applied to m1 . If m1 2.00 kg, m 2 3.00 kg, m 3 4.00 kg, and F 18.0 N, draw a separate free-body diagram for each block and find (a) the acceleration of the blocks, (b) the resultant force on each block, and (c) the magnitudes of the contact forces between the blocks. netic friction of 0.350. The three masses are 4.00 kg, 1.00 kg, and 2.00 kg, and the pulleys are frictionless. Draw a free-body diagram for each block. (a) Determine the magnitude and direction of the acceleration of each block. (b) Determine the tensions in the two cords. 51. Two blocks connected by a rope of negligible mass are being dragged by a horizontal force F (see Fig. P5.35). Suppose that F 68.0 N, m1 12.0 kg, m 2 18.0 kg, and the coefficient of kinetic friction between each block and the surface is 0.100. (a) Draw a free-body diagram for each block. (b) Determine the tension T and the magnitude of the acceleration of the system. 52. A block of mass 2.20 kg is accelerated across a rough surface by a rope passing over a pulley, as shown in Figure P5.52. The tension in the rope is 10.0 N, and the pulley is 10.0 cm above the top of the block. The coefficient of kinetic friction is 0.400. (a) Determine the acceleration of the block when x 0.400 m. (b) Find the value of x at which the acceleration becomes zero. 53. A block of mass 3.00 kg is pushed up against a wall by a force P that makes a 50.0 angle with the horizontal as shown in Figure P5.53. The coefficient of static friction between the block and the wall is 0.250. Determine the possible values for the magnitude of P that allow the block to remain stationary. 146 CHAPTER 5 The Laws of Motion the system is in equilibrium, find (e) the minimum value of M and (f) the maximum value of M. (g) Compare the values of T2 when M has its minimum and maximum values. 59. A mass M is held in place by an applied force F and a pulley system as shown in Figure P5.59. The pulleys are massless and frictionless. Find (a) the tension in each section of rope, T1 , T2 , T3 , T4 , and T5 and (b) the magnitude of F. (Hint: Draw a free-body diagram for each pulley.) WEB T4 Figure P5.55 T1 m1 m2 m3 T5 T2 T3 F Figure P5.56 M F 57. A high diver of mass 70.0 kg jumps off a board 10.0 m above the water. If his downward motion is stopped 2.00 s after he enters the water, what average upward force did the water exert on him? 58. Consider the three connected objects shown in Figure P5.58. If the inclined plane is frictionless and the system is in equilibrium, find (in terms of m, g, and ) (a) the mass M and (b) the tensions T1 and T2 . If the value of M is double the value found in part (a), find (c) the acceleration of each object, and (d) the tensions T1 and T2 . If the coefficient of static friction between m and 2m and the inclined plane is s , and Figure P5.59 60. Two forces, given by F1 ( 6.00i 4.00j) N and F2 ( 3.00i 7.00j) N, act on a particle of mass 2.00 kg that is initially at rest at coordinates ( 2.00 m, 4.00 m). (a) What are the components of the particle's velocity at t 10.0 s? (b) In what direction is the particle moving at t 10.0 s? (c) What displacement does the particle undergo during the first 10.0 s? (d) What are the coordinates of the particle at t 10.0 s? 61. A crate of weight Fg is pushed by a force P on a horizontal floor. (a) If the coefficient of static friction is s and P is directed at an angle below the horizontal, show that the minimum value of P that will move the crate is given by P s T2 m T1 2m M Fg sec (1 s tan ) 1 Figure P5.58 (b) Find the minimum value of P that can produce mo- Problems tion when s 0.400, Fg 100 N, and 0, 15.0, 30.0, 45.0, and 60.0. 62. Review Problem. A block of mass m 2.00 kg is released from rest h 0.500 m from the surface of a table, at the top of a 30.0 incline as shown in Figure P5.62. The frictionless incline is fixed on a table of height H 2.00 m. (a) Determine the acceleration of the block as it slides down the incline. (b) What is the velocity of the block as it leaves the incline? (c) How far from the table will the block hit the floor? (d) How much time has elapsed between when the block is released and when it hits the floor? (e) Does the mass of the block affect any of the above calculations? 147 65. A block of mass m 2.00 kg rests on the left edge of a block of larger mass M 8.00 kg. The coefficient of kinetic friction between the two blocks is 0.300, and the surface on which the 8.00-kg block rests is frictionless. A constant horizontal force of magnitude F 10.0 N is applied to the 2.00-kg block, setting it in motion as shown in Figure P5.65a. If the length L that the leading edge of the smaller block travels on the larger block is 3.00 m, (a) how long will it take before this block makes it to the right side of the 8.00-kg block, as shown in Figure P5.65b? (Note: Both blocks are set in motion when F is applied.) (b) How far does the 8.00-kg block move in the process? L m h F m M (a) H M F m R (b) Figure P5.62 63. A 1.30-kg toaster is not plugged in. The coefficient of static friction between the toaster and a horizontal countertop is 0.350. To make the toaster start moving, you carelessly pull on its electric cord. (a) For the cord tension to be as small as possible, you should pull at what angle above the horizontal? (b) With this angle, how large must the tension be? 64. A 2.00-kg aluminum block and a 6.00-kg copper block are connected by a light string over a frictionless pulley. They sit on a steel surface, as shown in Figure P5.64, and 30.0. Do they start to move once any holding mechanism is released? If so, determine (a) their acceleration and (b) the tension in the string. If not, determine the sum of the magnitudes of the forces of friction acting on the blocks. Figure P5.65 66. A student is asked to measure the acceleration of a cart on a "frictionless" inclined plane as seen in Figure P5.32, using an air track, a stopwatch, and a meter stick. The height of the incline is measured to be 1.774 cm, and the total length of the incline is measured to be d 127.1 cm. Hence, the angle of inclination is determined from the relation sin 1.774/127.1. The cart is released from rest at the top of the incline, and its displacement x along the incline is measured versus time, where x 0 refers to the initial position of the cart. For x values of 10.0 cm, 20.0 cm, 35.0 cm, 50.0 cm, 75.0 cm, and 100 cm, the measured times to undergo these displacements (averaged over five runs) are 1.02 s, 1.53 s, 2.01 s, 2.64 s, 3.30 s, and 3.75 s, respectively. Construct a graph of x versus t 2, and perform a linear least-squares fit to the data. Determine the acceleration of the cart from the slope of this graph, and compare it with the value you would get using a g sin , where g 9.80 m/s2. 67. A 2.00-kg block is placed on top of a 5.00-kg block as in Figure P5.67. The coefficient of kinetic friction between the 5.00-kg block and the surface is 0.200. A horizontal force F is applied to the 5.00-kg block. (a) Draw a freebody diagram for each block. What force accelerates the 2.00-kg block? (b) Calculate the magnitude of the force necessary to pull both blocks to the right with an Aluminum m1 Steel Copper m2 Figure P5.64 148 CHAPTER 5 The Laws of Motion 70. Initially the system of masses shown in Figure P5.69 is held motionless. All surfaces, pulley, and wheels are frictionless. Let the force F be zero and assume that m 2 can move only vertically. At the instant after the system of masses is released, find (a) the tension T in the string, (b) the acceleration of m 2 , (c) the acceleration of M, and (d) the acceleration of m1 . (Note: The pulley accelerates along with the cart.) 71. A block of mass 5.00 kg sits on top of a second block of mass 15.0 kg, which in turn sits on a horizontal table. The coefficients of friction between the two blocks are 0.300 and k 0.100. The coefficients of friction s between the lower block and the rough table are s 0.500 and k 0.400. You apply a constant horizontal force to the lower block, just large enough to make this block start sliding out from between the upper block and the table. (a) Draw a free-body diagram of each block, naming the forces acting on each. (b) Determine the magnitude of each force on each block at the instant when you have started pushing but motion has not yet started. (c) Determine the acceleration you measure for each block. 72. Two blocks of mass 3.50 kg and 8.00 kg are connected by a string of negligible mass that passes over a frictionless pulley (Fig. P5.72). The inclines are frictionless. Find (a) the magnitude of the acceleration of each block and (b) the tension in the string. 2.00 kg 5.00 kg F Figure P5.67 acceleration of 3.00 m/s2. (c) Find the minimum coefficient of static friction between the blocks such that the 2.00-kg block does not slip under an acceleration of 3.00 m/s2. 68. A 5.00-kg block is placed on top of a 10.0-kg block (Fig. P5.68). A horizontal force of 45.0 N is applied to the 10.0-kg block, and the 5.00-kg block is tied to the wall. The coefficient of kinetic friction between all surfaces is 0.200. (a) Draw a free-body diagram for each block and identify the action reaction forces between the blocks. (b) Determine the tension in the string and the magnitude of the acceleration of the 10.0-kg block. 5.00 kg 3.50 kg 35.0 8.00 kg 10.0 kg F = 45.0 N 35.0 Figure P5.72 Figure P5.68 69. What horizontal force must be applied to the cart shown in Figure P5.69 so that the blocks remain stationary relative to the cart? Assume all surfaces, wheels, and pulley are frictionless. (Hint: Note that the force exerted by the string accelerates m1 .) Problems 72 and 73. m1 m2 F M Figure P5.69 Problems 69 and 70. 73. The system shown in Figure P5.72 has an acceleration of magnitude 1.50 m/s2. Assume the coefficients of kinetic friction between block and incline are the same for both inclines. Find (a) the coefficient of kinetic friction and (b) the tension in the string. 74. In Figure P5.74, a 500-kg horse pulls a sledge of mass 100 kg. The system (horse plus sledge) has a forward acceleration of 1.00 m/s2 when the frictional force exerted on the sledge is 500 N. Find (a) the tension in the connecting rope and (b) the magnitude and direction of the force of friction exerted on the horse. (c) Verify that the total forces of friction the ground exerts on the system will give the system an acceleration of 1.00 m/s2. 75. A van accelerates down a hill (Fig. P5.75), going from rest to 30.0 m/s in 6.00 s. During the acceleration, a toy (m 0.100 kg) hangs by a string from the van's ceiling. The acceleration is such that the string remains perpendicular to the ceiling. Determine (a) the angle and (b) the tension in the string. Answers to Quick Quizzes 149 100 kg 500 kg terms of 1 , that the sections of string between the outside butterflies and the inside butterflies form with the horizontal. (c) Show that the distance D between the end points of the string is D L 5 2 cos 1 2 cos tan 1 1 tan 2 1 1 Figure P5.74 Figure P5.75 76. A mobile is formed by supporting four metal butterflies of equal mass m from a string of length L. The points of support are evenly spaced a distance apart as shown in Figure P5.76. The string forms an angle 1 with the ceiling at each end point. The center section of string is horizontal. (a) Find the tension in each section of string in terms of 1 , m, and g. (b) Find the angle 2 , in 77. Before 1960 it was believed that the maximum attainable coefficient of static friction for an automobile tire was less than 1. Then about 1962, three companies independently developed racing tires with coefficients of 1.6. Since then, tires have improved, as illustrated in this problem. According to the 1990 Guinness Book of Records, the fastest time in which a piston-engine car initially at rest has covered a distance of one-quarter mile is 4.96 s. This record was set by Shirley Muldowney in September 1989 (Fig. P5.77). (a) Assuming that the rear wheels nearly lifted the front wheels off the pavement, what minimum value of s is necessary to achieve the record time? (b) Suppose Muldowney were able to double her engine power, keeping other things equal. How would this change affect the elapsed time? D 1 2 2 1 Figure P5.77 78. An 8.40-kg mass slides down a fixed, frictionless inclined plane. Use a computer to determine and tabulate the normal force exerted on the mass and its acceleration for a series of incline angles (measured from the horizontal) ranging from 0 to 90 in 5 increments. Plot a graph of the normal force and the acceleration as functions of the incline angle. In the limiting cases of 0 and 90, are your results consistent with the known behavior? m m m m L=5 Figure P5.76 ANSWERS TO QUICK QUIZZES 5.1 (a) True. Newton's first law tells us that motion requires no force: An object in motion continues to move at constant velocity in the absence of external forces. (b) True. A stationary object can have several forces acting on it, but if the vector sum of all these external forces is zero, there is no net force and the object remains stationary. It also is possible to have a net force and no motion, but only for an instant. A ball tossed vertically upward stops at the peak of its path for an infinitesimally short time, but the force of gravity is still acting on it. Thus, al- 150 CHAPTER 5 The Laws of Motion ends up not being accelerated sufficiently to make it to the dock. Consequently, he falls into the water instead. If a small dog were to jump from the untied boat toward the dock, the force exerted by the boat on the dog would probably be enough to ensure the dog's successful landing because of the dog's small mass. 5.5 (a) The same force is experienced by both. The fly and bus experience forces that are equal in magnitude but opposite in direction. (b) The fly. Because the fly has such a small mass, it undergoes a very large acceleration. The huge mass of the bus means that it more effectively resists any change in its motion. 5.6 (b) The crate accelerates to the right. Because the only horizontal force acting on it is the force of static friction between its bottom surface and the truck bed, that force must also be directed to the right. though v 0 at the peak, the net force acting on the ball is not zero. 5.2 No. Direction of motion is part of an object's velocity, and force determines the direction of acceleration, not that of velocity. 5.3 (a) Force of gravity. (b) Force of gravity. The only external force acting on the ball at all points in its trajectory is the downward force of gravity. 5.4 As the person steps out of the boat, he pushes against it with his foot, expecting the boat to push back on him so that he accelerates toward the dock. However, because the boat is untied, the force exerted by the foot causes the boat to scoot away from the dock. As a result, the person is not able to exert a very large force on the boat before it moves out of reach. Therefore, the boat does not exert a very large reaction force on him, and he P U Z Z L E R This sky diver is falling at more than 50 m/s (120 mi/h), but once her parachute opens, her downward velocity will be greatly reduced. Why does she slow down rapidly when her chute opens, enabling her to fall safely to the ground? If the chute does not function properly, the sky diver will almost certainly be seriously injured. What force exerted on her limits her maximum speed? (Guy Savage/Photo Researchers, Inc.) c h a p t e r Circular Motion and Other Applications of Newton's Laws Chapter Outline 6.1 Newton's Second Law Applied to Uniform Circular Motion 6.4 (Optional) Motion in the Presence of Resistive Forces 6.2 Nonuniform Circular Motion 6.3 (Optional) Motion in Accelerated Frames 6.5 (Optional) Numerical Modeling in Particle Dynamics 151 152 CHAPTER 6 Circular Motion and Other Applications of Newton's Laws I n the preceding chapter we introduced Newton's laws of motion and applied them to situations involving linear motion. Now we discuss motion that is slightly more complicated. For example, we shall apply Newton's laws to objects traveling in circular paths. Also, we shall discuss motion observed from an accelerating frame of reference and motion in a viscous medium. For the most part, this chapter is a series of examples selected to illustrate the application of Newton's laws to a wide variety of circumstances. 6.1 NEWTON'S SECOND LAW APPLIED TO UNIFORM CIRCULAR MOTION In Section 4.4 we found that a particle moving with uniform speed v in a circular path of radius r experiences an acceleration ar that has a magnitude ar v2 r 4.7 The acceleration is called the centripetal acceleration because ar is directed toward the center of the circle. Furthermore, ar is always perpendicular to v. (If there were a component of acceleration parallel to v, the particle's speed would be changing.) Consider a ball of mass m that is tied to a string of length r and is being whirled at constant speed in a horizontal circular path, as illustrated in Figure 6.1. Its weight is supported by a low-friction table. Why does the ball move in a circle? Because of its inertia, the tendency of the ball is to move in a straight line; however, the string prevents motion along a straight line by exerting on the ball a force that makes it follow the circular path. This force is directed along the string toward the center of the circle, as shown in Figure 6.1. This force can be any one of our familiar forces causing an object to follow a circular path. If we apply Newton's second law along the radial direction, we find that the value of the net force causing the centripetal acceleration can be evaluated: Fr mar m v2 r (6.1) Force causing centripetal acceleration m Fr r Fr Figure 6.1 Overhead view of a ball moving in a circular path in a horizontal plane. A force Fr directed toward the center of the circle keeps the ball moving in its circular path. 6.1 Newton's Second Law Applied to Uniform Circular Motion 153 Figure 6.2 When the string breaks, the ball moves in the direction tangent to the circle. r A force causing a centripetal acceleration acts toward the center of the circular path and causes a change in the direction of the velocity vector. If that force should vanish, the object would no longer move in its circular path; instead, it would move along a straight-line path tangent to the circle. This idea is illustrated in Figure 6.2 for the ball whirling at the end of a string. If the string breaks at some instant, the ball moves along the straight-line path tangent to the circle at the point where the string broke. Quick Quiz 6.1 Is it possible for a car to move in a circular path in such a way that it has a tangential acceleration but no centripetal acceleration? An athlete in the process of throwing the hammer at the 1996 Olympic Games in Atlanta, Georgia. The force exerted by the chain is the force causing the circular motion. Only when the athlete releases the hammer will it move along a straight-line path tangent to the circle. CONCEPTUAL EXAMPLE 6.1 Forces That Cause Centripetal Acceleration Consider some examples. For the motion of the Earth around the Sun, the centripetal force is gravity. For an object sitting on a rotating turntable, the centripetal force is friction. For a rock whirled on the end of a string, the centripetal force is the force of tension in the string. For an amusementpark patron pressed against the inner wall of a rapidly rotating circular room, the centripetal force is the normal force exerted by the wall. What's more, the centripetal force could be a combination of two or more forces. For example, as a Ferris-wheel rider passes through the lowest point, the centripetal force on her is the difference between the normal force exerted by the seat and her weight. The force causing centripetal acceleration is sometimes called a centripetal force. We are familiar with a variety of forces in nature -- friction, gravity, normal forces, tension, and so forth. Should we add centripetal force to this list? Solution No; centripetal force should not be added to this list. This is a pitfall for many students. Giving the force causing circular motion a name -- centripetal force -- leads many students to consider it a new kind of force rather than a new role for force. A common mistake in force diagrams is to draw all the usual forces and then to add another vector for the centripetal force. But it is not a separate force -- it is simply one of our familiar forces acting in the role of a force that causes a circular motion. 154 CHAPTER 6 Circular Motion and Other Applications of Newton's Laws (a) (b) (c) (d) Figure 6.3 A ball that had been moving in a circular path is acted on by various external forces that change its path. Quick Quiz 6.2 QuickLab Tie a string to a tennis ball, swing it in a circle, and then, while it is swinging, let go of the string to verify your answer to the last part of Quick Quiz 6.2. A ball is following the dotted circular path shown in Figure 6.3 under the influence of a force. At a certain instant of time, the force on the ball changes abruptly to a new force, and the ball follows the paths indicated by the solid line with an arrowhead in each of the four parts of the figure. For each part of the figure, describe the magnitude and direction of the force required to make the ball move in the solid path. If the dotted line represents the path of a ball being whirled on the end of a string, which path does the ball follow if the string breaks? Let us consider some examples of uniform circular motion. In each case, be sure to recognize the external force (or forces) that causes the body to move in its circular path. EXAMPLE 6.2 How Fast Can It Spin? Solving for v, we have v A ball of mass 0.500 kg is attached to the end of a cord 1.50 m long. The ball is whirled in a horizontal circle as was shown in Figure 6.1. If the cord can withstand a maximum tension of 50.0 N, what is the maximum speed the ball can attain before the cord breaks? Assume that the string remains horizontal during the motion. Tr m Solution It is difficult to know what might be a reasonable value for the answer. Nonetheless, we know that it cannot be too large, say 100 m/s, because a person cannot make a ball move so quickly. It makes sense that the stronger the cord, the faster the ball can twirl before the cord breaks. Also, we expect a more massive ball to break the cord at a lower speed. (Imagine whirling a bowling ball!) Because the force causing the centripetal acceleration in this case is the force T exerted by the cord on the ball, Equation 6.1 yields for Fr mar v2 T m r This shows that v increases with T and decreases with larger m, as we expect to see -- for a given v, a large mass requires a large tension and a small mass needs only a small tension. The maximum speed the ball can have corresponds to the maximum tension. Hence, we find vmax Tmaxr m (50.0 N)(1.50 m) 0.500 kg 12.2 m/s Exercise Answer Calculate the tension in the cord if the speed of the ball is 5.00 m/s. 8.33 N. EXAMPLE 6.3 The Conical Pendulum Let us choose to represent the angle between string and vertical. In the free-body diagram shown in Figure 6.4, the force T exerted by the string is resolved into a vertical component T cos and a horizontal component T sin acting toward the center of revolution. Because the object does A small object of mass m is suspended from a string of length L. The object revolves with constant speed v in a horizontal circle of radius r, as shown in Figure 6.4. (Because the string sweeps out the surface of a cone, the system is known as a conical pendulum.) Find an expression for v. Solution 6.1 Newton's Second Law Applied to Uniform Circular Motion 155 not accelerate in the vertical direction, Fy may 0, and the upward vertical component of T must balance the downward force of gravity. Therefore, (1) T cos mg Because the force providing the centripetal acceleration in this example is the component T sin , we can use Newton's second law and Equation 6.1 to obtain (2) Fr T sin ma r mv 2 r /cos Dividing (2) by (1) and remembering that sin tan , we eliminate T and find that L T cos tan v T sin T r v2 rg rg tan L sin ; From the geometry in Figure 6.4, we note that r therefore, v mg mg The conical pendulum and its free-body diagram. Lg sin tan Figure 6.4 Note that the speed is independent of the mass of the object. EXAMPLE 6.4 What Is the Maximum Speed of the Car? and dry pavement is 0.500, find the maximum speed the car can have and still make the turn successfully. A 1 500-kg car moving on a flat, horizontal road negotiates a curve, as illustrated in Figure 6.5. If the radius of the curve is 35.0 m and the coefficient of static friction between the tires fs Solution From experience, we should expect a maximum speed less than 50 m/s. (A convenient mental conversion is that 1 m/s is roughly 2 mi/h.) In this case, the force that enables the car to remain in its circular path is the force of static friction. (Because no slipping occurs at the point of contact between road and tires, the acting force is a force of static friction directed toward the center of the curve. If this force of static friction were zero -- for example, if the car were on an icy road -- the car would continue in a straight line and slide off the road.) Hence, from Equation 6.1 we have (a) (1) fs m v2 r n fs mg (b) The maximum speed the car can have around the curve is the speed at which it is on the verge of skidding outward. At this point, the friction force has its maximum value fs,max sn. Because the car is on a horizontal road, the magnitude of the normal force equals the weight (n mg) and thus fs,max smg. Substituting this value for fs into (1), we find that the maximum speed is vmax Figure 6.5 (a) The force of static friction directed toward the center of the curve keeps the car moving in a circular path. (b) The freebody diagram for the car. fs,maxr m smgr m s gr (0.500)(9.80 m/s2)(35.0 m) 13.1 m/s 156 CHAPTER 6 Circular Motion and Other Applications of Newton's Laws Note that the maximum speed does not depend on the mass of the car. That is why curved highways do not need multiple speed limit signs to cover the various masses of vehicles using the road. Exercise Answer On a wet day, the car begins to skid on the curve when its speed reaches 8.00 m/s. What is the coefficient of static friction in this case? 0.187. EXAMPLE 6.5 The Banked Exit Ramp n sin pointing toward the center of the curve. Because the ramp is to be designed so that the force of static friction is zero, only the component n sin causes the centripetal acceleration. Hence, Newton's second law written for the radial direction gives (1) Fr n sin mv2 r A civil engineer wishes to design a curved exit ramp for a highway in such a way that a car will not have to rely on friction to round the curve without skidding. In other words, a car moving at the designated speed can negotiate the curve even when the road is covered with ice. Such a ramp is usually banked; this means the roadway is tilted toward the inside of the curve. Suppose the designated speed for the ramp is to be 13.4 m/s (30.0 mi/h) and the radius of the curve is 50.0 m. At what angle should the curve be banked? Solution On a level (unbanked) road, the force that causes the centripetal acceleration is the force of static friction between car and road, as we saw in the previous example. However, if the road is banked at an angle , as shown in Figure 6.6, the normal force n has a horizontal component The car is in equilibrium in the vertical direction. Thus, from Fy 0, we have (2) n cos mg Dividing (1) by (2) gives tan v2 rg tan 1 n n cos (13.4 m/s)2 (50.0 m)(9.80 m/s2) 20.1 n sin mg mg If a car rounds the curve at a speed less than 13.4 m/s, friction is needed to keep it from sliding down the bank (to the left in Fig. 6.6). A driver who attempts to negotiate the curve at a speed greater than 13.4 m/s has to depend on friction to keep from sliding up the bank (to the right in Fig. 6.6). The banking angle is independent of the mass of the vehicle negotiating the curve. Figure 6.6 Car rounding a curve on a road banked at an angle to the horizontal. When friction is neglected, the force that causes the centripetal acceleration and keeps the car moving in its circular path is the horizontal component of the normal force. Note that n is the sum of the forces exerted by the road on the wheels. Exercise Write Newton's second law applied to the radial direction when a frictional force fs is directed down the bank, toward the center of the curve. Answer n sin fs cos mv 2 r EXAMPLE 6.6 Satellite Motion masses m1 and m 2 and separated by a distance r is attractive and has a magnitude m1m2 Fg G r2 This example treats a satellite moving in a circular orbit around the Earth. To understand this situation, you must know that the gravitational force between spherical objects and small objects that can be modeled as particles having 6.1 Newton's Second Law Applied to Uniform Circular Motion and keeps the satellite in its circular orbit. Therefore, Fr Fg G MEm r2 157 where G 6.673 10 11 N m2/kg2. This is Newton's law of gravitation, which we study in Chapter 14. Consider a satellite of mass m moving in a circular orbit around the Earth at a constant speed v and at an altitude h above the Earth's surface, as illustrated in Figure 6.7. Determine the speed of the satellite in terms of G, h, RE (the radius of the Earth), and ME (the mass of the Earth). From Newton's second law and Equation 6.1 we obtain G MEm r2 m v2 r Solution The only external force acting on the satellite is the force of gravity, which acts toward the center of the Earth Solving for v and remembering that the distance r from the center of the Earth to the satellite is r RE h, we obtain (1) v GME r GME RE h r h RE Fg If the satellite were orbiting a different planet, its velocity would increase with the mass of the planet and decrease as the satellite's distance from the center of the planet increased. Exercise v m Figure 6.7 A satellite of mass m moving around the Earth at a constant speed v in a circular orbit of radius r RE h. The force Fg acting on the satellite that causes the centripetal acceleration is the gravitational force exerted by the Earth on the satellite. A satellite is in a circular orbit around the Earth at an altitude of 1 000 km. The radius of the Earth is equal to 6.37 106 m, and its mass is 5.98 1024 kg. Find the speed of the satellite, and then find the period, which is the time it needs to make one complete revolution. 7.36 103 m/s; 6.29 103 s = 105 min. Answer EXAMPLE 6.7 Let's Go Loop-the-Loop! celeration has a magnitude n bot mg, Newton's second law for the radial direction combined with Equation 6.1 gives Fr nbot nbot mg mg m v2 r m v2 r mg 1 v2 rg A pilot of mass m in a jet aircraft executes a loop-the-loop, as shown in Figure 6.8a. In this maneuver, the aircraft moves in a vertical circle of radius 2.70 km at a constant speed of 225 m/s. Determine the force exerted by the seat on the pilot (a) at the bottom of the loop and (b) at the top of the loop. Express your answers in terms of the weight of the pilot mg. Solution We expect the answer for (a) to be greater than that for (b) because at the bottom of the loop the normal and gravitational forces act in opposite directions, whereas at the top of the loop these two forces act in the same direction. It is the vector sum of these two forces that gives the force of constant magnitude that keeps the pilot moving in a circular path. To yield net force vectors with the same magnitude, the normal force at the bottom (where the normal and gravitational forces are in opposite directions) must be greater than that at the top (where the normal and gravitational forces are in the same direction). (a) The free-body diagram for the pilot at the bottom of the loop is shown in Figure 6.8b. The only forces acting on him are the downward force of gravity Fg mg and the upward force n bot exerted by the seat. Because the net upward force that provides the centripetal ac- Substituting the values given for the speed and radius gives nbot mg 1 (2.70 (225 m/s)2 103 m)(9.80 m/s2) 2.91mg Hence, the magnitude of the force n bot exerted by the seat on the pilot is greater than the weight of the pilot by a factor of 2.91. This means that the pilot experiences an apparent weight that is greater than his true weight by a factor of 2.91. (b) The free-body diagram for the pilot at the top of the loop is shown in Figure 6.8c. As we noted earlier, both the gravitational force exerted by the Earth and the force n top exerted by the seat on the pilot act downward, and so the net downward force that provides the centripetal acceleration has 158 CHAPTER 6 Circular Motion and Other Applications of Newton's Laws n bot Top Figure 6.8 (a) An aircraft executes a loop-the-loop maneuver as it moves in a vertical circle at constant speed. (b) Free-body diagram for the pilot at the bottom of the loop. In this position the pilot experiences an apparent weight greater than his true weight. (c) Free-body diagram for the pilot at the top of the loop. A ntop mg (b) mg (c) Bottom (a) a magnitude n top Fr ntop ntop ntop m mg v2 r mg mg mg. Applying Newton's second law yields m v2 r v2 rg 1 1 0.913mg In this case, the magnitude of the force exerted by the seat on the pilot is less than his true weight by a factor of 0.913, and the pilot feels lighter. Exercise mg Determine the magnitude of the radially directed force exerted on the pilot by the seat when the aircraft is at point A in Figure 6.8a, midway up the loop. nA 1.913mg directed to the right. (2.70 (225 m/s)2 103 m)(9.80 m/s2) Answer Quick Quiz 6.3 A bead slides freely along a curved wire at constant speed, as shown in the overhead view of Figure 6.9. At each of the points , , and , draw the vector representing the force that the wire exerts on the bead in order to cause it to follow the path of the wire at that point. QuickLab Hold a shoe by the end of its lace and spin it in a vertical circle. Can you feel the difference in the tension in the lace when the shoe is at top of the circle compared with when the shoe is at the bottom? Figure 6.9 6.2 NONUNIFORM CIRCULAR MOTION In Chapter 4 we found that if a particle moves with varying speed in a circular path, there is, in addition to the centripetal (radial) component of acceleration, a tangential component having magnitude dv/dt. Therefore, the force acting on the 6.2 Nonuniform Circular Motion 159 Some examples of forces acting during circular motion. (Left) As these speed skaters round a curve, the force exerted by the ice on their skates provides the centripetal acceleration. (Right) Passengers on a "corkscrew" roller coaster. What are the origins of the forces in this example? Figure 6.10 When the force acting on a particle moving in a circular path has a tangential component Ft , the particle's speed changes. The total force exerted on the particle in this case is the vector sum of the radial force and the tangential force. That is, F Fr Ft . F Fr Ft particle must also have a tangential and a radial component. Because the total acceleration is a ar at , the total force exerted on the particle is F Fr Ft , as shown in Figure 6.10. The vector Fr is directed toward the center of the circle and is responsible for the centripetal acceleration. The vector Ft tangent to the circle is responsible for the tangential acceleration, which represents a change in the speed of the particle with time. The following example demonstrates this type of motion. EXAMPLE 6.8 Keep Your Eye on the Ball A small sphere of mass m is attached to the end of a cord of length R and whirls in a vertical circle about a fixed point O, as illustrated in Figure 6.11a. Determine the tension in the cord at any instant when the speed of the sphere is v and the cord makes an angle with the vertical. Solution Unlike the situation in Example 6.7, the speed is not uniform in this example because, at most points along the path, a tangential component of acceleration arises from the gravitational force exerted on the sphere. From the free-body diagram in Figure 6.11b, we see that the only forces acting on 160 CHAPTER 6 Circular Motion and Other Applications of Newton's Laws vtop mg R O T O Ttop T bot mg cos mg sin mg mg (a) (b) v bot Figure 6.11 (a) Forces acting on a sphere of mass m connected to a cord of length R and rotating in a vertical circle centered at O. (b) Forces acting on the sphere at the top and bottom of the circle. The tension is a maximum at the bottom and a minimum at the top. the sphere are the gravitational force Fg m g exerted by the Earth and the force T exerted by the cord. Now we resolve Fg into a tangential component mg sin and a radial component mg cos . Applying Newton's second law to the forces acting on the sphere in the tangential direction yields Ft at mg sin g sin mat Special Cases At the top of the path, where have cos 180 v2 top R 180, we 1, and the tension equation becomes Ttop m g This tangential component of the acceleration causes v to change in time because at dv/dt. Applying Newton's second law to the forces acting on the sphere in the radial direction and noting that both T and ar are directed toward O, we obtain Fr T mg cos v2 R mv2 R g cos This is the minimum value of T. Note that at this point at 0 and therefore the acceleration is purely radial and directed downward. At the bottom of the path, where 0, we see that, because cos 0 1, v2 bot Tbot m g R This is the maximum value of T. At this point, at is again 0 and the acceleration is now purely radial and directed upward. Exercise Answer T m At what position of the sphere would the cord most likely break if the average speed were to increase? At the bottom, where T has its maximum value. Optional Section 6.3 MOTION IN ACCELERATED FRAMES When Newton's laws of motion were introduced in Chapter 5, we emphasized that they are valid only when observations are made in an inertial frame of reference. In this section, we analyze how an observer in a noninertial frame of reference (one that is accelerating) applies Newton's second law. 6.3 Motion in Accelerated Frames 161 4.8 To understand the motion of a system that is noninertial because an object is moving along a curved path, consider a car traveling along a highway at a high speed and approaching a curved exit ramp, as shown in Figure 6.12a. As the car takes the sharp left turn onto the ramp, a person sitting in the passenger seat slides to the right and hits the door. At that point, the force exerted on her by the door keeps her from being ejected from the car. What causes her to move toward the door? A popular, but improper, explanation is that some mysterious force acting from left to right pushes her outward. (This is often called the "centrifugal" force, but we shall not use this term because it often creates confusion.) The passenger invents this fictitious force to explain what is going on in her accelerated frame of reference, as shown in Figure 6.12b. (The driver also experiences this effect but holds on to the steering wheel to keep from sliding to the right.) The phenomenon is correctly explained as follows. Before the car enters the ramp, the passenger is moving in a straight-line path. As the car enters the ramp and travels a curved path, the passenger tends to move along the original straightline path. This is in accordance with Newton's first law: The natural tendency of a body is to continue moving in a straight line. However, if a sufficiently large force (toward the center of curvature) acts on the passenger, as in Figure 6.12c, she will move in a curved path along with the car. The origin of this force is the force of friction between her and the car seat. If this frictional force is not large enough, she will slide to the right as the car turns to the left under her. Eventually, she encounters the door, which provides a force large enough to enable her to follow the same curved path as the car. She slides toward the door not because of some mysterious outward force but because the force of friction is not sufficiently great to allow her to travel along the circular path followed by the car. In general, if a particle moves with an acceleration a relative to an observer in an inertial frame, that observer may use Newton's second law and correctly claim that F ma. If another observer in an accelerated frame tries to apply Newton's second law to the motion of the particle, the person must introduce fictitious forces to make Newton's second law work. These forces "invented" by the observer in the accelerating frame appear to be real. However, we emphasize that these fictitious forces do not exist when the motion is observed in an inertial frame. Fictitious forces are used only in an accelerating frame and do not represent "real" forces acting on the particle. (By real forces, we mean the interaction of the particle with its environment.) If the fictitious forces are properly defined in the accelerating frame, the description of motion in this frame is equivalent to the description given by an inertial observer who considers only real forces. Usually, we analyze motions using inertial reference frames, but there are cases in which it is more convenient to use an accelerating frame. QuickLab Use a string, a small weight, and a protractor to measure your acceleration as you start sprinting from a standing position. Fictitious forces (a) (b) Figure 6.12 (a) A car approaching a curved exit ramp. What causes a front-seat passenger to move toward the right-hand door? (b) From the frame of reference of the passenger, a (fictitious) force pushes her toward the right door. (c) Relative to the reference frame of the Earth, the car seat applies a leftward force to the passenger, causing her to change direction along with the rest of the car. (c) 162 CHAPTER 6 Circular Motion and Other Applications of Newton's Laws EXAMPLE 6.9 Fictitious Forces in Linear Motion Because the deflection of the cord from the vertical serves as a measure of acceleration, a simple pendulum can be used as an accelerometer. According to the noninertial observer riding in the car (Fig. 6.13b), the cord still makes an angle with the vertical; however, to her the sphere is at rest and so its acceleration is zero. Therefore, she introduces a fictitious force to balance the horizontal component of T and claims that the net force on the sphere is zero! In this noninertial frame of reference, Newton's second law in component form yields Noninertial observer 0 Fx Fy T sin T cos Ffictitious mg 0 0 A small sphere of mass m is hung by a cord from the ceiling of a boxcar that is accelerating to the right, as shown in Figure 6.13. According to the inertial observer at rest (Fig. 6.13a), the forces on the sphere are the force T exerted by the cord and the force of gravity. The inertial observer concludes that the acceleration of the sphere is the same as that of the boxcar and that this acceleration is provided by the horizontal component of T. Also, the vertical component of T balances the force of gravity. Therefore, she writes Newton's second law as F T m g ma, which in component form becomes Inertial observer (1) (2) Fx Fy T sin T cos ma mg Thus, by solving (1) and (2) simultaneously for a, the inertial observer can determine the magnitude of the car's acceleration through the relationship a g tan If we recognize that Ffictitious ma inertial ma, then these expressions are equivalent to (1) and (2); therefore, the noninertial observer obtains the same mathematical results as the inertial observer does. However, the physical interpretation of the deflection of the cord differs in the two frames of reference. a T mg Inertial observer (a) Noninertial observer Ffictitious T mg (b) Figure 6.13 A small sphere suspended from the ceiling of a boxcar accelerating to the right is deflected as shown. (a) An inertial observer at rest outside the car claims that the acceleration of the sphere is provided by the horizontal component of T. (b) A noninertial observer riding in the car says that the net force on the sphere is zero and that the deflection of the cord from the vertical is due to a fictitious force Ffictitious that balances the horizontal component of T. 6.4 Motion in the Presence of Resistive Forces 163 EXAMPLE 6.10 Fictitious Force in a Rotating System According to a noninertial observer attached to the turntable, the block is at rest and its acceleration is zero. Therefore, she must introduce a fictitious outward force of magnitude mv 2/r to balance the inward force exerted by the string. According to her, the net force on the block is zero, and she writes Newton's second law as T mv 2/r 0. Suppose a block of mass m lying on a horizontal, frictionless turntable is connected to a string attached to the center of the turntable, as shown in Figure 6.14. According to an inertial observer, if the block rotates uniformly, it undergoes an acceleration of magnitude v 2/r, where v is its linear speed. The inertial observer concludes that this centripetal acceleration is provided by the force T exerted by the string and writes Newton's second law as T mv 2/r. n n Noninertial observer T Ffictitious = mv 2 r T mg mg (a) Inertial observer (b) Figure 6.14 A block of mass m connected to a string tied to the center of a rotating turntable. (a) The inertial observer claims that the force causing the circular motion is provided by the force T exerted by the string on the block. (b) The noninertial observer claims that the block is not accelerating, and therefore she introduces a fictitious force of magnitude mv 2/r that acts outward and balances the force T. Optional Section 6.4 4.9 MOTION IN THE PRESENCE OF RESISTIVE FORCES In the preceding chapter we described the force of kinetic friction exerted on an object moving on some surface. We completely ignored any interaction between the object and the medium through which it moves. Now let us consider the effect of that medium, which can be either a liquid or a gas. The medium exerts a resistive force R on the object moving through it. Some examples are the air resistance associated with moving vehicles (sometimes called air drag) and the viscous forces that act on objects moving through a liquid. The magnitude of R depends on such factors as the speed of the object, and the direction of R is always opposite the direction of motion of the object relative to the medium. The magnitude of R nearly always increases with increasing speed. The magnitude of the resistive force can depend on speed in a complex way, and here we consider only two situations. In the first situation, we assume the resistive force is proportional to the speed of the moving object; this assumption is valid for objects falling slowly through a liquid and for very small objects, such as dust particles, moving through air. In the second situation, we assume a resistive force that is proportional to the square of the speed of the moving object; large objects, such as a skydiver moving through air in free fall, experience such a force. 164 CHAPTER 6 Circular Motion and Other Applications of Newton's Laws v=0 a=g v R v mg vt 0.63vt (a) v = vt a=0 (b) (c) t (a) A small sphere falling through a liquid. (b) Motion diagram of the sphere as it falls. (c) Speed time graph for the sphere. The sphere reaches a maximum, or terminal, speed vt , and the time constant is the time it takes to reach 0.63vt . Figure 6.15 Resistive Force Proportional to Object Speed If we assume that the resistive force acting on an object moving through a liquid or gas is proportional to the object's speed, then the magnitude of the resistive force can be expressed as R bv (6.2) where v is the speed of the object and b is a constant whose value depends on the properties of the medium and on the shape and dimensions of the object. If the object is a sphere of radius r, then b is proportional to r. Consider a small sphere of mass m released from rest in a liquid, as in Figure 6.15a. Assuming that the only forces acting on the sphere are the resistive force bv and the force of gravity Fg , let us describe its motion.1 Applying Newton's second law to the vertical motion, choosing the downward direction to be positive, and noting that Fy mg bv, we obtain mg bv ma m dv dt (6.3) where the acceleration dv/dt is downward. Solving this expression for the acceleration gives dv dt g b v m (6.4) Terminal speed This equation is called a differential equation, and the methods of solving it may not be familiar to you as yet. However, note that initially, when v 0, the resistive force bv is also zero and the acceleration dv/dt is simply g. As t increases, the resistive force increases and the acceleration decreases. Eventually, the acceleration becomes zero when the magnitude of the resistive force equals the sphere's weight. At this point, the sphere reaches its terminal speed vt , and from then on There is also a buoyant force acting on the submerged object. This force is constant, and its magnitude is equal to the weight of the displaced liquid. This force changes the apparent weight of the sphere by a constant factor, so we will ignore the force here. We discuss buoyant forces in Chapter 15. 1 6.4 Motion in the Presence of Resistive Forces 165 it continues to move at this speed with zero acceleration, as shown in Figure 6.15b. We can obtain the terminal speed from Equation 6.3 by setting a dv/dt 0. This gives mg bvt 0 or vt mg/b The expression for v that satisfies Equation 6.4 with v v mg (1 b e bt/m) 0 at t ) 0 is (6.5) vt (1 e t/ This function is plotted in Figure 6.15c. The time constant m/b (Greek letter tau) is the time it takes the sphere to reach 63.2% ( 1 1/e) of its terminal speed. This can be seen by noting that when t , Equation 6.5 yields v 0.632vt . We can check that Equation 6.5 is a solution to Equation 6.4 by direct differentiation: mg d mg bt/m dv d mg e e bt/m ge bt/m dt dt b b b dt (See Appendix Table B.4 for the derivative of e raised to some power.) Substituting into Equation 6.4 both this expression for dv/dt and the expression for v given by Equation 6.5 shows that our solution satisfies the differential equation. Aerodynamic car. A streamlined body reduces air drag and increases fuel efficiency. EXAMPLE 6.11 Sphere Falling in Oil 0.900vt 1 e e t/ t/ A small sphere of mass 2.00 g is released from rest in a large vessel filled with oil, where it experiences a resistive force proportional to its speed. The sphere reaches a terminal speed of 5.00 cm/s. Determine the time constant and the time it takes the sphere to reach 90% of its terminal speed. vt(1 0.900 0.100 e t/ ) t t ln(0.100) 2.30 2.30 10 3 Solution vt b Because the terminal mg/b, the coefficient b is mg vt speed is given by 2.30(5.10 s) 11.7 10 3 s (2.00 g)(980 cm/s2) 5.00 cm/s 392 g/s 11.7 ms Thus, the sphere reaches 90% of its terminal (maximum) speed in a very short time. Therefore, the time constant is m b 2.00 g 392 g/s 5.10 10 3 s The speed of the sphere as a function of time is given by Equation 6.5. To find the time t it takes the sphere to reach a speed of 0.900vt , we set v 0.900vt in Equation 6.5 and solve for t: Exercise What is the sphere's speed through the oil at t 11.7 ms? Compare this value with the speed the sphere would have if it were falling in a vacuum and so were influenced only by gravity. Answer 4.50 cm/s in oil versus 11.5 cm/s in free fall. Air Drag at High Speeds For objects moving at high speeds through air, such as airplanes, sky divers, cars, and baseballs, the resistive force is approximately proportional to the square of the speed. In these situations, the magnitude of the resistive force can be expressed as R 1 2D Av2 (6.6) 166 CHAPTER 6 Circular Motion and Other Applications of Newton's Laws R v R mg vt where is the density of air, A is the cross-sectional area of the falling object measured in a plane perpendicular to its motion, and D is a dimensionless empirical quantity called the drag coefficient. The drag coefficient has a value of about 0.5 for spherical objects but can have a value as great as 2 for irregularly shaped objects. Let us analyze the motion of an object in free fall subject to an upward air resistive force of magnitude R 1 D Av2. Suppose an object of mass m is re2 leased from rest. As Figure 6.16 shows, the object experiences two external forces: the downward force of gravity Fg mg and the upward resistive force R. (There is also an upward buoyant force that we neglect.) Hence, the magnitude of the net force is F mg 1 2D Av2 (6.7) mg where we have taken downward to be the positive vertical direction. Substituting F ma into Equation 6.7, we find that the object has a downward acceleration of magnitude D A a g v2 (6.8) 2m We can calculate the terminal speed vt by using the fact that when the force of gravity is balanced by the resistive force, the net force on the object is zero and therefore its acceleration is zero. Setting a 0 in Equation 6.8 gives g D A 2m vt2 vt 0 Figure 6.16 An object falling through air experiences a resistive force R and a gravitational force Fg mg. The object reaches terminal speed (on the right) when the net force acting on it is zero, that is, when R Fg or R mg. Before this occurs, the acceleration varies with speed according to Equation 6.8. 2mg D A (6.9) Using this expression, we can determine how the terminal speed depends on the dimensions of the object. Suppose the object is a sphere of radius r. In this case, A r2 (from A r 2 ) and m r3 (because the mass is proportional to the volume of the sphere, which is V 4 r3). Therefore, vt r. 3 Table 6.1 lists the terminal speeds for several objects falling through air. The high cost of fuel has prompted many truck owners to install wind deflectors on their cabs to reduce drag. 6.4 Motion in the Presence of Resistive Forces 167 TABLE 6.1 Terminal Speed for Various Objects Falling Through Air Object Sky diver Baseball (radius 3.7 cm) Golf ball (radius 2.1 cm) Hailstone (radius 0.50 cm) Raindrop (radius 0.20 cm) Mass (kg) 75 0.145 0.046 4.8 10 3.4 10 Cross-Sectional Area (m2) 4.2 1.4 7.9 1.3 0.70 10 10 10 10 3 3 5 5 vt (m/s) 60 43 44 14 9.0 4 5 CONCEPTUAL EXAMPLE 6.12 Consider a sky surfer who jumps from a plane with her feet attached firmly to her surfboard, does some tricks, and then opens her parachute. Describe the forces acting on her during these maneuvers. Solution When the surfer first steps out of the plane, she has no vertical velocity. The downward force of gravity causes her to accelerate toward the ground. As her downward speed increases, so does the upward resistive force exerted by the air on her body and the board. This upward force reduces their acceleration, and so their speed increases more slowly. Eventually, they are going so fast that the upward resistive force matches the downward force of gravity. Now the net force is zero and they no longer accelerate, but reach their terminal speed. At some point after reaching terminal speed, she opens her parachute, resulting in a drastic increase in the upward resistive force. The net force (and thus the acceleration) is now upward, in the direction opposite the direction of the velocity. This causes the downward velocity to decrease rapidly; this means the resistive force on the chute also decreases. Eventually the upward resistive force and the downward force of gravity balance each other and a much smaller terminal speed is reached, permitting a safe landing. (Contrary to popular belief, the velocity vector of a sky diver never points upward. You may have seen a videotape in which a sky diver appeared to "rocket" upward once the chute opened. In fact, what happened is that the diver slowed down while the person holding the camera continued falling at high speed.) A sky surfer takes advantage of the upward force of the air on her board. ( EXAMPLE 6.13 Falling Coffee Filters presents data for these coffee filters as they fall through the air. The time constant is small, so that a dropped filter quickly reaches terminal speed. Each filter has a mass of 1.64 g. When the filters are nested together, they stack in The dependence of resistive force on speed is an empirical relationship. In other words, it is based on observation rather than on a theoretical model. A series of stacked filters is dropped, and the terminal speeds are measured. Table 6.2 168 CHAPTER 6 Circular Motion and Other Applications of Newton's Laws Two filters nested together experience 0.032 2 N of resistive force, and so forth. A graph of the resistive force on the filters as a function of terminal speed is shown in Figure 6.17a. A straight line would not be a good fit, indicating that the resistive force is not proportional to the speed. The curved line is for a second-order polynomial, indicating a proportionality of the resistive force to the square of the speed. This proportionality is more clearly seen in Figure 6.17b, in which the resistive force is plotted as a function of the square of the terminal speed. such a way that the front-facing surface area does not increase. Determine the relationship between the resistive force exerted by the air and the speed of the falling filters. Solution At terminal speed, the upward resistive force balances the downward force of gravity. So, a single filter falling at its terminal speed experiences a resistive force of R mg 1.64 g 1000 g/kg (9.80 m/s2) 0.016 1 N TABLE 6.2 Terminal Speed for Stacked Coffee Filters Number of Filters 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 a vt (m/s)a 1.01 1.40 1.63 2.00 2.25 2.40 2.57 2.80 3.05 3.22 Pleated coffee filters can be nested together so that the force of air resistance can be studied. ( All values of vt are approximate. 0.18 0.16 0.14 0.12 0.10 0.08 0.06 0.04 0.02 0.00 0.18 0.16 0.14 0.12 0.10 0.08 0.06 0.04 0.02 0.00 Resistive force (N) Resistive force (N) 0 1 2 Terminal speed (m/s) (a) 3 4 0 2 4 6 (b) 8 10 12 Terminal speed squared (m/s)2 Figure 6.17 (a) Relationship between the resistive force acting on falling coffee filters and their terminal speed. The curved line is a second-order polynomial fit. (b) Graph relating the resistive force to the square of the terminal speed. The fit of the straight line to the data points indicates that the resistive force is proportional to the terminal speed squared. Can you find the proportionality constant? 6.5 Numerical Modeling in Particle Dynamics 169 EXAMPLE 6.14 Resistive Force Exerted on a Baseball D 2 mg vt2 A 0.284 2(0.145 kg)(9.80 m/s2) (43 m/s)2 (1.29 kg/m3)(4.2 10 3 A pitcher hurls a 0.145-kg baseball past a batter at 40.2 m/s ( 90 mi/h). Find the resistive force acting on the ball at this speed. m2) We do not expect the air to exert a huge force on the ball, and so the resistive force we calculate from Equation 6.6 should not be more than a few newtons. First, we must determine the drag coefficient D. We do this by imagining that we drop the baseball and allow it to reach terminal speed. We solve Equation 6.9 for D and substitute the appropriate values for m, vt , and A from Table 6.1. Taking the density of air as 1.29 kg/m3, we obtain Solution This number has no dimensions. We have kept an extra digit beyond the two that are significant and will drop it at the end of our calculation. We can now use this value for D in Equation 6.6 to find the magnitude of the resistive force: R 1 2 2 D Av 1 2 (0.284)(1.29 kg/m3)(4.2 10 3 m2)(40.2 m/s)2 1.2 N Optional Section 6.5 NUMERICAL MODELING IN PARTICLE DYNAMICS 2 As we have seen in this and the preceding chapter, the study of the dynamics of a particle focuses on describing the position, velocity, and acceleration as functions of time. Cause-and-effect relationships exist among these quantities: Velocity causes position to change, and acceleration causes velocity to change. Because acceleration is the direct result of applied forces, any analysis of the dynamics of a particle usually begins with an evaluation of the net force being exerted on the particle. Up till now, we have used what is called the analytical method to investigate the position, velocity, and acceleration of a moving particle. Let us review this method briefly before learning about a second way of approaching problems in dynamics. (Because we confine our discussion to one-dimensional motion in this section, boldface notation will not be used for vector quantities.) If a particle of mass m moves under the influence of a net force F, Newton's second law tells us that the acceleration of the particle is a F/m. In general, we apply the analytical method to a dynamics problem using the following procedure: 1. 2. 3. 4. Sum all the forces acting on the particle to get the net force F. Use this net force to determine the acceleration from the relationship a F/m. Use this acceleration to determine the velocity from the relationship dv/dt a. Use this velocity to determine the position from the relationship dx/dt v. The following straightforward example illustrates this method. EXAMPLE 6.15 An Object Falling in a Vacuum -- Analytical Method Consider a particle falling in a vacuum under the influence of the force of gravity, as shown in Figure 6.18. Use the analytical method to find the acceleration, velocity, and position of the particle. 2 Solution The only force acting on the particle is the downward force of gravity of magnitude Fg , which is also the net force. Applying Newton's second law, we set the net force acting on the particle equal to the mass of the particle times The authors are most grateful to Colonel James Head of the U.S. Air Force Academy for preparing this section. See the Student Tools CD-ROM for some assistance with numerical modeling. 170 CHAPTER 6 Circular Motion and Other Applications of Newton's Laws In these expressions, yi and vyi represent the position and speed of the particle at t i 0. its acceleration (taking upward to be the positive y direction): Fg ma y mg g, which means the acceleration is constant. BeThus, a y g, which may be incause dv y /dt a y, we see that dv y /dt tegrated to yield v y(t) v yi gt Then, because v y dy/dt, the position of the particle is obtained from another integration, which yields the well-known result y(t) yi v yi t 1 2 2 gt mg Figure 6.18 of gravity. An object falling in vacuum under the influence The analytical method is straightforward for many physical situations. In the "real world," however, complications often arise that make analytical solutions difficult and perhaps beyond the mathematical abilities of most students taking introductory physics. For example, the net force acting on a particle may depend on the particle's position, as in cases where the gravitational acceleration varies with height. Or the force may vary with velocity, as in cases of resistive forces caused by motion through a liquid or gas. Another complication arises because the expressions relating acceleration, velocity, position, and time are differential equations rather than algebraic ones. Differential equations are usually solved using integral calculus and other special techniques that introductory students may not have mastered. When such situations arise, scientists often use a procedure called numerical modeling to study motion. The simplest numerical model is called the Euler method, after the Swiss mathematician Leonhard Euler (1707 1783). The Euler Method In the Euler method for solving differential equations, derivatives are approximated as ratios of finite differences. Considering a small increment of time t, we can approximate the relationship between a particle's speed and the magnitude of its acceleration as a(t) v t v(t t) t v(t) t) of the particle at the end of the time interval t is apThen the speed v(t proximately equal to the speed v(t) at the beginning of the time interval plus the magnitude of the acceleration during the interval multiplied by t: v(t t) v(t) a(t) t (6.10) Because the acceleration is a function of time, this estimate of v(t t) is accurate only if the time interval t is short enough that the change in acceleration during it is very small (as is discussed later). Of course, Equation 6.10 is exact if the acceleration is constant. 6.5 Numerical Modeling in Particle Dynamics 171 The position x(t t) of the particle at the end of the interval found in the same manner: v(t) x(t x t t) x(t x(t) 1 2 t can be t) t v(t) t t)2 x(t) (6.11) You may be tempted to add the term a( to this result to make it look like the familiar kinematics equation, but this term is not included in the Euler method because t is assumed to be so small that t 2 is nearly zero. If the acceleration at any instant t is known, the particle's velocity and position at a time t t can be calculated from Equations 6.10 and 6.11. The calculation then proceeds in a series of finite steps to determine the velocity and position at any later time. The acceleration is determined from the net force acting on the particle, and this force may depend on position, velocity, or time: a(x, v, t) F(x, v, t) m (6.12) It is convenient to set up the numerical solution to this kind of problem by numbering the steps and entering the calculations in a table, a procedure that is illustrated in Table 6.3. The equations in the table can be entered into a spreadsheet and the calculations performed row by row to determine the velocity, position, and acceleration as functions of time. The calculations can also be carried out by using a program written in either BASIC, C , or FORTRAN or by using commercially available mathematics packages for personal computers. Many small increments can be taken, and accurate results can usually be obtained with the help of a computer. Graphs of velocity versus time or position versus time can be displayed to help you visualize the motion. One advantage of the Euler method is that the dynamics is not obscured -- the fundamental relationships between acceleration and force, velocity and acceleration, and position and velocity are clearly evident. Indeed, these relationships form the heart of the calculations. There is no need to use advanced mathematics, and the basic physics governs the dynamics. The Euler method is completely reliable for infinitesimally small time increments, but for practical reasons a finite increment size must be chosen. For the finite difference approximation of Equation 6.10 to be valid, the time increment must be small enough that the acceleration can be approximated as being constant during the increment. We can determine an appropriate size for the time in- See the spreadsheet file "Baseball with Drag" on the Student Web site (address below) for an example of how this technique can be applied to find the initial speed of the baseball described in Example 6.14. We cannot use our regular approach because our kinematics equations assume constant acceleration. Euler's method provides a way to circumvent this difficulty. A detailed solution to Problem 41 involving iterative integration appears in the Student Solutions Manual and Study Guide and is posted on the Web at http:/ www.saunderscollege.com/physics TABLE 6.3 The Euler Method for Solving Dynamics Problems Step 0 1 2 3 n Time t0 t1 t2 t3 tn t0 t1 t2 t t t Position x0 x1 x2 x3 xn x0 x1 x2 v0 t v1 t v2 t Velocity v0 v1 v2 v3 vn v0 v1 v2 a0 t a1 t a2 t Acceleration a0 a1 a2 a3 an F(x 0 , v0 , t 0)/m F(x 1 , v 1 , t 1)/m F(x 2 , v 2 , t 2)/m F(x 3 , v 3 , t 3)/m 172 CHAPTER 6 Circular Motion and Other Applications of Newton's Laws crement by examining the particular problem being investigated. The criterion for the size of the time increment may need to be changed during the course of the motion. In practice, however, we usually choose a time increment appropriate to the initial conditions and use the same value throughout the calculations. The size of the time increment influences the accuracy of the result, but unfortunately it is not easy to determine the accuracy of an Euler-method solution without a knowledge of the correct analytical solution. One method of determining the accuracy of the numerical solution is to repeat the calculations with a smaller time increment and compare results. If the two calculations agree to a certain number of significant figures, you can assume that the results are correct to that precision. SUMMARY Newton's second law applied to a particle moving in uniform circular motion states that the net force causing the particle to undergo a centripetal acceleration is Fr mar mv2 r (6.1) You should be able to use this formula in situations where the force providing the centripetal acceleration could be the force of gravity, a force of friction, a force of string tension, or a normal force. A particle moving in nonuniform circular motion has both a centripetal component of acceleration and a nonzero tangential component of acceleration. In the case of a particle rotating in a vertical circle, the force of gravity provides the tangential component of acceleration and part or all of the centripetal component of acceleration. Be sure you understand the directions and magnitudes of the velocity and acceleration vectors for nonuniform circular motion. An observer in a noninertial (accelerating) frame of reference must introduce fictitious forces when applying Newton's second law in that frame. If these fictitious forces are properly defined, the description of motion in the noninertial frame is equivalent to that made by an observer in an inertial frame. However, the observers in the two frames do not agree on the causes of the motion. You should be able to distinguish between inertial and noninertial frames and identify the fictitious forces acting in a noninertial frame. A body moving through a liquid or gas experiences a resistive force that is speed-dependent. This resistive force, which opposes the motion, generally increases with speed. The magnitude of the resistive force depends on the shape of the body and on the properties of the medium through which the body is moving. In the limiting case for a falling body, when the magnitude of the resistive force equals the body's weight, the body reaches its terminal speed. You should be able to apply Newton's laws to analyze the motion of objects moving under the influence of resistive forces. You may need to apply Euler's method if the force depends on velocity, as it does for air drag. QUESTIONS 1. Because the Earth rotates about its axis and revolves around the Sun, it is a noninertial frame of reference. Assuming the Earth is a uniform sphere, why would the apparent weight of an object be greater at the poles than at the equator? 2. Explain why the Earth bulges at the equator. Problems 3. Why is it that an astronaut in a space capsule orbiting the Earth experiences a feeling of weightlessness? 4. Why does mud fly off a rapidly turning automobile tire? 5. Imagine that you attach a heavy object to one end of a spring and then whirl the spring and object in a horizontal circle (by holding the free end of the spring). Does the spring stretch? If so, why? Discuss this in terms of the force causing the circular motion. 6. It has been suggested that rotating cylinders about 10 mi in length and 5 mi in diameter be placed in space and used as colonies. The purpose of the rotation is to simulate gravity for the inhabitants. Explain this concept for producing an effective gravity. 7. Why does a pilot tend to black out when pulling out of a steep dive? 173 8. Describe a situation in which a car driver can have a centripetal acceleration but no tangential acceleration. 9. Describe the path of a moving object if its acceleration is constant in magnitude at all times and (a) perpendicular to the velocity; (b) parallel to the velocity. 10. Analyze the motion of a rock falling through water in terms of its speed and acceleration as it falls. Assume that the resistive force acting on the rock increases as the speed increases. 11. Consider a small raindrop and a large raindrop falling through the atmosphere. Compare their terminal speeds. What are their accelerations when they reach terminal speed? PROBLEMS 1, 2, 3 = straightforward, intermediate, challenging = full solution available in the Student Solutions Manual and Study Guide WEB = solution posted at http://www.saunderscollege.com/physics/ = Computer useful in solving problem = Interactive Physics = paired numerical/symbolic problems Section 6.1 Newton's Second Law Applied to Uniform Circular Motion 1. A toy car moving at constant speed completes one lap around a circular track (a distance of 200 m) in 25.0 s. (a) What is its average speed? (b) If the mass of the car is 1.50 kg, what is the magnitude of the force that keeps it in a circle? 2. A 55.0-kg ice skater is moving at 4.00 m/s when she grabs the loose end of a rope, the opposite end of which is tied to a pole. She then moves in a circle of radius 0.800 m around the pole. (a) Determine the force exerted by the rope on her arms. (b) Compare this force with her weight. 3. A light string can support a stationary hanging load of 25.0 kg before breaking. A 3.00-kg mass attached to the string rotates on a horizontal, frictionless table in a circle of radius 0.800 m. What range of speeds can the mass have before the string breaks? 4. In the Bohr model of the hydrogen atom, the speed of the electron is approximately 2.20 106 m/s. Find (a) the force acting on the electron as it revolves in a circular orbit of radius 0.530 10 10 m and (b) the centripetal acceleration of the electron. 5. In a cyclotron (one type of particle accelerator), a deuteron (of atomic mass 2.00 u) reaches a final speed of 10.0% of the speed of light while moving in a circular path of radius 0.480 m. The deuteron is maintained in the circular path by a magnetic force. What magnitude of force is required? 6. A satellite of mass 300 kg is in a circular orbit around the Earth at an altitude equal to the Earth's mean radius (see Example 6.6). Find (a) the satellite's orbital 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. speed, (b) the period of its revolution, and (c) the gravitational force acting on it. Whenever two Apollo astronauts were on the surface of the Moon, a third astronaut orbited the Moon. Assume the orbit to be circular and 100 km above the surface of the Moon. If the mass of the Moon is 7.40 1022 kg and its radius is 1.70 106 m, determine (a) the orbiting astronaut's acceleration, (b) his orbital speed, and (c) the period of the orbit. The speed of the tip of the minute hand on a town clock is 1.75 10 3 m/s. (a) What is the speed of the tip of the second hand of the same length? (b) What is the centripetal acceleration of the tip of the second hand? A coin placed 30.0 cm from the center of a rotating, horizontal turntable slips when its speed is 50.0 cm/s. (a) What provides the force in the radial direction when the coin is stationary relative to the turntable? (b) What is the coefficient of static friction between coin and turntable? The cornering performance of an automobile is evaluated on a skid pad, where the maximum speed that a car can maintain around a circular path on a dry, flat surface is measured. The centripetal acceleration, also called the lateral acceleration, is then calculated as a multiple of the free-fall acceleration g. The main factors affecting the performance are the tire characteristics and the suspension system of the car. A Dodge Viper GTS can negotiate a skid pad of radius 61.0 m at 86.5 km/h. Calculate its maximum lateral acceleration. A crate of eggs is located in the middle of the flatbed of a pickup truck as the truck negotiates an unbanked 174 CHAPTER 6 Circular Motion and Other Applications of Newton's Laws hump? (b) What must be the speed of the car over the hump if she is to experience weightlessness? (That is, if her apparent weight is zero.) 15. Tarzan (m 85.0 kg) tries to cross a river by swinging from a vine. The vine is 10.0 m long, and his speed at the bottom of the swing (as he just clears the water) is 8.00 m/s. Tarzan doesn't know that the vine has a breaking strength of 1 000 N. Does he make it safely across the river? 16. A hawk flies in a horizontal arc of radius 12.0 m at a constant speed of 4.00 m/s. (a) Find its centripetal acceleration. (b) It continues to fly along the same horizontal arc but steadily increases its speed at the rate of 1.20 m/s2. Find the acceleration (magnitude and direction) under these conditions. 17. A 40.0-kg child sits in a swing supported by two chains, each 3.00 m long. If the tension in each chain at the lowest point is 350 N, find (a) the child's speed at the lowest point and (b) the force exerted by the seat on the child at the lowest point. (Neglect the mass of the seat.) 18. A child of mass m sits in a swing supported by two chains, each of length R. If the tension in each chain at the lowest point is T, find (a) the child's speed at the lowest point and (b) the force exerted by the seat on the child at the lowest point. (Neglect the mass of the seat.) WEB curve in the road. The curve may be regarded as an arc of a circle of radius 35.0 m. If the coefficient of static friction between crate and truck is 0.600, how fast can WEB the truck be moving without the crate sliding? 12. A car initially traveling eastward turns north by traveling in a circular path at uniform speed as in Figure P6.12. The length of the arc ABC is 235 m, and the car completes the turn in 36.0 s. (a) What is the acceleration when the car is at B located at an angle of 35.0? Express your answer in terms of the unit vectors i and j. Determine (b) the car 's average speed and (c) its average acceleration during the 36.0-s interval. y O 35.0 B A C x Figure P6.12 13. Consider a conical pendulum with an 80.0-kg bob on a 10.0-m wire making an angle of 5.00 with the vertical (Fig. P6.13). Determine (a) the horizontal and vertical components of the force exerted by the wire on the pendulum and (b) the radial acceleration of the bob. 19. A pail of water is rotated in a vertical circle of radius 1.00 m. What must be the minimum speed of the pail at the top of the circle if no water is to spill out? 20. A 0.400-kg object is swung in a vertical circular path on a string 0.500 m long. If its speed is 4.00 m/s at the top of the circle, what is the tension in the string there? 21. A roller-coaster car has a mass of 500 kg when fully loaded with passengers (Fig. P6.21). (a) If the car has a speed of 20.0 m/s at point A, what is the force exerted by the track on the car at this point? (b) What is the maximum speed the car can have at B and still remain on the track? B 15.0 m Figure P6.13 Section 6.2 Nonuniform Circular Motion 10.0 m A 14. A car traveling on a straight road at 9.00 m/s goes over a hump in the road. The hump may be regarded as an arc of a circle of radius 11.0 m. (a) What is the apparent weight of a 600-N woman in the car as she rides over the Figure P6.21 Problems 22. A roller coaster at the Six Flags Great America amusement park in Gurnee, Illinois, incorporates some of the latest design technology and some basic physics. Each vertical loop, instead of being circular, is shaped like a teardrop (Fig. P6.22). The cars ride on the inside of the loop at the top, and the speeds are high enough to ensure that the cars remain on the track. The biggest loop is 40.0 m high, with a maximum speed of 31.0 m/s (nearly 70 mi/h) at the bottom. Suppose the speed at the top is 13.0 m/s and the corresponding centripetal acceleration is 2g. (a) What is the radius of the arc of the teardrop at the top? (b) If the total mass of the cars plus people is M, what force does the rail exert on this total mass at the top? (c) Suppose the roller coaster had a loop of radius 20.0 m. If the cars have the same speed, 13.0 m/s at the top, what is the centripetal acceleration at the top? Comment on the normal force at the top in this situation. 175 24. A 5.00-kg mass attached to a spring scale rests on a frictionless, horizontal surface as in Figure P6.24. The spring scale, attached to the front end of a boxcar, reads 18.0 N when the car is in motion. (a) If the spring scale reads zero when the car is at rest, determine the acceleration of the car. (b) What will the spring scale read if the car moves with constant velocity? (c) Describe the forces acting on the mass as observed by someone in the car and by someone at rest outside the car. 5.00 kg Figure P6.24 Figure P6.22 (Frank Cezus/FPG International) (Optional) Section 6.3 Motion in Accelerated Frames 23. A merry-go-round makes one complete revolution in 12.0 s. If a 45.0-kg child sits on the horizontal floor of the merry-go-round 3.00 m from the center, find (a) the child's acceleration and (b) the horizontal force of friction that acts on the child. (c) What minimum coefficient of static friction is necessary to keep the child from slipping? 25. A 0.500-kg object is suspended from the ceiling of an accelerating boxcar as was seen in Figure 6.13. If a 3.00 m/s2, find (a) the angle that the string makes with the vertical and (b) the tension in the string. 26. The Earth rotates about its axis with a period of 24.0 h. Imagine that the rotational speed can be increased. If an object at the equator is to have zero apparent weight, (a) what must the new period be? (b) By what factor would the speed of the object be increased when the planet is rotating at the higher speed? (Hint: See Problem 53 and note that the apparent weight of the object becomes zero when the normal force exerted on it is zero. Also, the distance traveled during one period is 2 R, where R is the Earth's radius.) 27. A person stands on a scale in an elevator. As the elevator starts, the scale has a constant reading of 591 N. As the elevator later stops, the scale reading is 391 N. Assume the magnitude of the acceleration is the same during starting and stopping, and determine (a) the weight of the person, (b) the person's mass, and (c) the acceleration of the elevator. 28. A child on vacation wakes up. She is lying on her back. The tension in the muscles on both sides of her neck is 55.0 N as she raises her head to look past her toes and out the motel window. Finally, it is not raining! Ten minutes later she is screaming and sliding feet first down a water slide at a constant speed of 5.70 m/s, riding high on the outside wall of a horizontal curve of radius 2.40 m (Fig. P6.28). She raises her head to look forward past her toes; find the tension in the muscles on both sides of her neck. 176 CHAPTER 6 Circular Motion and Other Applications of Newton's Laws 40.0 m/s 20.0 m 40.0 620 kg Figure P6.34 force is proportional to the square of the bucket's speed. A small, spherical bead of mass 3.00 g is released from rest at t 0 in a bottle of liquid shampoo. The terminal speed is observed to be vt 2.00 cm/s. Find (a) the value of the constant b in Equation 6.4, (b) the time the bead takes to reach 0.632vt , and (c) the value of the resistive force when the bead reaches terminal speed. The mass of a sports car is 1 200 kg. The shape of the car is such that the aerodynamic drag coefficient is 0.250 and the frontal area is 2.20 m2. Neglecting all other sources of friction, calculate the initial acceleration of the car if, after traveling at 100 km/h, it is shifted into neutral and is allowed to coast. A motorboat cuts its engine when its speed is 10.0 m/s and coasts to rest. The equation governing the motion of the motorboat during this period is v vi e ct, where v is the speed at time t, vi is the initial speed, and c is a constant. At t 20.0 s, the speed is 5.00 m/s. (a) Find the constant c. (b) What is the speed at t 40.0 s? (c) Differentiate the expression for v(t) and thus show that the acceleration of the boat is proportional to the speed at any time. Assume that the resistive force acting on a speed skater is f kmv 2, where k is a constant and m is the skater 's mass. The skater crosses the finish line of a straight-line race with speed vf and then slows down by coasting on his skates. Show that the skater 's speed at any time t after crossing the finish line is v(t) vf /(1 ktvf ). You can feel a force of air drag on your hand if you stretch your arm out of the open window of a speeding car. (Note: Do not get hurt.) What is the order of magnitude of this force? In your solution, state the quantities you measure or estimate and their values. Figure P6.28 35. 29. A plumb bob does not hang exactly along a line directed to the center of the Earth, because of the Earth's rotation. How much does the plumb bob deviate from a radial line at 35.0 north latitude? Assume that the Earth is spherical. (Optional) 36. Section 6.4 Motion in the Presence of Resistive Forces 30. A sky diver of mass 80.0 kg jumps from a slow-moving aircraft and reaches a terminal speed of 50.0 m/s. (a) What is the acceleration of the sky diver when her speed is 30.0 m/s? What is the drag force exerted on the diver when her speed is (b) 50.0 m/s? (c) 30.0 m/s? 31. A small piece of Styrofoam packing material is dropped from a height of 2.00 m above the ground. Until it reaches terminal speed, the magnitude of its acceleration is given by a g bv. After falling 0.500 m, the Styrofoam effectively reaches its terminal speed, and then takes 5.00 s more to reach the ground. (a) What is the value of the constant b? (b) What is the acceleration at t 0? (c) What is the acceleration when the speed is 0.150 m/s? 32. (a) Estimate the terminal speed of a wooden sphere (density 0.830 g/cm3) falling through the air if its radius is 8.00 cm. (b) From what height would a freely falling object reach this speed in the absence of air resistance? 33. Calculate the force required to pull a copper ball of radius 2.00 cm upward through a fluid at the constant speed 9.00 cm/s. Take the drag force to be proportional to the speed, with proportionality constant 0.950 kg/s. Ignore the buoyant force. 34. A fire helicopter carries a 620-kg bucket at the end of a cable 20.0 m long as in Figure P6.34. As the helicopter flies to a fire at a constant speed of 40.0 m/s, the cable makes an angle of 40.0 with respect to the vertical. The bucket presents a cross-sectional area of 3.80 m2 in a plane perpendicular to the air moving past it. Determine the drag coefficient assuming that the resistive WEB 37. 38. 39. (Optional) 6.5 Numerical Modeling in Particle Dynamics 40. A 3.00-g leaf is dropped from a height of 2.00 m above the ground. Assume the net downward force exerted on the leaf is F mg bv, where the drag factor is b 0.030 0 kg/s. (a) Calculate the terminal speed of the leaf. (b) Use Euler 's method of numerical analysis to find the speed and position of the leaf as functions of Problems time, from the instant it is released until 99% of terminal speed is reached. (Hint: Try t 0.005 s.) 41. A hailstone of mass 4.80 10 4 kg falls through the air and experiences a net force given by F mg Cv 2 177 ADDITIONAL PROBLEMS 46. An 1 800-kg car passes over a bump in a road that follows the arc of a circle of radius 42.0 m as in Figure P6.46. (a) What force does the road exert on the car as the car passes the highest point of the bump if the car travels at 16.0 m/s? (b) What is the maximum speed the car can have as it passes this highest point before losing contact with the road? 47. A car of mass m passes over a bump in a road that follows the arc of a circle of radius R as in Figure P6.46. (a) What force does the road exert on the car as the car passes the highest point of the bump if the car travels at a speed v? (b) What is the maximum speed the car can have as it passes this highest point before losing contact with the road? WEB 42. 43. 44. 45. where C 2.50 10 5 kg/m. (a) Calculate the terminal speed of the hailstone. (b) Use Euler 's method of numerical analysis to find the speed and position of the hailstone at 0.2-s intervals, taking the initial speed to be zero. Continue the calculation until the hailstone reaches 99% of terminal speed. A 0.142-kg baseball has a terminal speed of 42.5 m/s (95 mi/h). (a) If a baseball experiences a drag force of magnitude R Cv 2, what is the value of the constant C ? (b) What is the magnitude of the drag force when the speed of the baseball is 36.0 m/s? (c) Use a computer to determine the motion of a baseball thrown vertically upward at an initial speed of 36.0 m/s. What maximum height does the ball reach? How long is it in the air? What is its speed just before it hits the ground? A 50.0-kg parachutist jumps from an airplane and falls with a drag force proportional to the square of the speed R Cv 2. Take C 0.200 kg/m with the parachute closed and C 20.0 kg/m with the chute open. (a) Determine the terminal speed of the parachutist in both configurations, before and after the chute is opened. (b) Set up a numerical analysis of the motion and compute the speed and position as functions of time, assuming the jumper begins the descent at 1 000 m above the ground and is in free fall for 10.0 s before opening the parachute. (Hint: When the parachute opens, a sudden large acceleration takes place; a smaller time step may be necessary in this region.) Consider a 10.0-kg projectile launched with an initial speed of 100 m/s, at an angle of 35.0 elevation. The resistive force is R bv, where b 10.0 kg/s. (a) Use a numerical method to determine the horizontal and vertical positions of the projectile as functions of time. (b) What is the range of this projectile? (c) Determine the elevation angle that gives the maximum range for the projectile. (Hint: Adjust the elevation angle by trial and error to find the greatest range.) A professional golfer hits a golf ball of mass 46.0 g with her 5-iron, and the ball first strikes the ground 155 m (170 yards) away. The ball experiences a drag force of magnitude R Cv 2 and has a terminal speed of 44.0 m/s. (a) Calculate the drag constant C for the golf ball. (b) Use a numerical method to analyze the trajectory of this shot. If the initial velocity of the ball makes an angle of 31.0 (the loft angle) with the horizontal, what initial speed must the ball have to reach the 155-m distance? (c) If the same golfer hits the ball with her 9iron (47.0 loft) and it first strikes the ground 119 m away, what is the initial speed of the ball? Discuss the differences in trajectories between the two shots. v Figure P6.46 Problems 46 and 47. 48. In one model of a hydrogen atom, the electron in orbit around the proton experiences an attractive force of about 8.20 10 8 N. If the radius of the orbit is 5.30 10 11 m, how many revolutions does the electron make each second? (This number of revolutions per unit time is called the frequency of the motion.) See the inside front cover for additional data. 49. A student builds and calibrates an accelerometer, which she uses to determine the speed of her car around a certain unbanked highway curve. The accelerometer is a plumb bob with a protractor that she attaches to the roof of her car. A friend riding in the car with her observes that the plumb bob hangs at an angle of 15.0 from the vertical when the car has a speed of 23.0 m/s. (a) What is the centripetal acceleration of the car rounding the curve? (b) What is the radius of the curve? (c) What is the speed of the car if the plumb bob deflection is 9.00 while the car is rounding the same curve? 50. Suppose the boxcar shown in Figure 6.13 is moving with constant acceleration a up a hill that makes an angle with the horizontal. If the hanging pendulum makes a constant angle with the perpendicular to the ceiling, what is a? 51. An air puck of mass 0.250 kg is tied to a string and allowed to revolve in a circle of radius 1.00 m on a fric- 178 CHAPTER 6 Circular Motion and Other Applications of Newton's Laws that, when the mass sits a distance L up along the sloping side, the speed of the mass must be v (g L sin )1/2 tionless horizontal table. The other end of the string passes through a hole in the center of the table, and a mass of 1.00 kg is tied to it (Fig. P6.51). The suspended mass remains in equilibrium while the puck on the tabletop revolves. What are (a) the tension in the string, (b) the force exerted by the string on the puck, and (c) the speed of the puck? 52. An air puck of mass m1 is tied to a string and allowed to revolve in a circle of radius R on a frictionless horizontal table. The other end of the string passes through a hole in the center of the table, and a mass m 2 is tied to it (Fig. P6.51). The suspended mass remains in equilibrium while the puck on the tabletop revolves. What are (a) the tension in the string? (b) the central force exerted on the puck? (c) the speed of the puck? m L Figure P6.55 56. The pilot of an airplane executes a constant-speed loopthe-loop maneuver. His path is a vertical circle. The speed of the airplane is 300 mi/h, and the radius of the circle is 1 200 ft. (a) What is the pilot's apparent weight at the lowest point if his true weight is 160 lb? (b) What is his apparent weight at the highest point? (c) Describe how the pilot could experience apparent weightlessness if both the radius and the speed can be varied. (Note: His apparent weight is equal to the force that the seat exerts on his body.) 57. For a satellite to move in a stable circular orbit at a constant speed, its centripetal acceleration must be inversely proportional to the square of the radius r of the orbit. (a) Show that the tangential speed of a satellite is proportional to r 1/2. (b) Show that the time required to complete one orbit is proportional to r 3/2. 58. A penny of mass 3.10 g rests on a small 20.0-g block supported by a spinning disk (Fig. P6.58). If the coeffi- Figure P6.51 Problems 51 and 52. WEB 53. Because the Earth rotates about its axis, a point on the equator experiences a centripetal acceleration of 0.033 7 m/s2, while a point at one of the poles experiences no centripetal acceleration. (a) Show that at the equator the gravitational force acting on an object (the true weight) must exceed the object's apparent weight. (b) What is the apparent weight at the equator and at the poles of a person having a mass of 75.0 kg? (Assume the Earth is a uniform sphere and take g 9.800 m/s2.) 54. A string under a tension of 50.0 N is used to whirl a rock in a horizontal circle of radius 2.50 m at a speed of 20.4 m/s. The string is pulled in and the speed of the rock increases. When the string is 1.00 m long and the speed of the rock is 51.0 m/s, the string breaks. What is the breaking strength (in newtons) of the string? 55. A child's toy consists of a small wedge that has an acute angle (Fig. P6.55). The sloping side of the wedge is frictionless, and a mass m on it remains at constant height if the wedge is spun at a certain constant speed. The wedge is spun by rotating a vertical rod that is firmly attached to the wedge at the bottom end. Show Disk Penny 12.0 cm Block Figure P6.58 Problems cients of friction between block and disk are 0.750 (static) and 0.640 (kinetic) while those for the penny and block are 0.450 (kinetic) and 0.520 (static), what is the maximum rate of rotation (in revolutions per minute) that the disk can have before either the block or the penny starts to slip? 59. Figure P6.59 shows a Ferris wheel that rotates four times each minute and has a diameter of 18.0 m. (a) What is the centripetal acceleration of a rider? What force does the seat exert on a 40.0-kg rider (b) at the lowest point of the ride and (c) at the highest point of the ride? (d) What force (magnitude and direction) does the seat exert on a rider when the rider is halfway between top and bottom? 179 8.00 m 2.50 m Figure P6.61 63. An amusement park ride consists of a large vertical cylinder that spins about its axis fast enough that any person inside is held up against the wall when the floor drops away (Fig. P6.63). The coefficient of static friction between person and wall is s , and the radius of the cylinder is R. (a) Show that the maximum period of revolution necessary to keep the person from falling is T (4 2R s /g)1/2. (b) Obtain a numerical value for T Figure P6.59 (Color Box/FPG) 60. A space station, in the form of a large wheel 120 m in diameter, rotates to provide an "artificial gravity" of 3.00 m/s2 for persons situated at the outer rim. Find the rotational frequency of the wheel (in revolutions per minute) that will produce this effect. 61. An amusement park ride consists of a rotating circular platform 8.00 m in diameter from which 10.0-kg seats are suspended at the end of 2.50-m massless chains (Fig. P6.61). When the system rotates, the chains make an angle 28.0 with the vertical. (a) What is the speed of each seat? (b) Draw a free-body diagram of a 40.0-kg child riding in a seat and find the tension in the chain. 62. A piece of putty is initially located at point A on the rim of a grinding wheel rotating about a horizontal axis. The putty is dislodged from point A when the diameter through A is horizontal. The putty then rises vertically and returns to A the instant the wheel completes one revolution. (a) Find the speed of a point on the rim of the wheel in terms of the acceleration due to gravity and the radius R of the wheel. (b) If the mass of the putty is m, what is the magnitude of the force that held it to the wheel? Figure P6.63 180 CHAPTER 6 Circular Motion and Other Applications of Newton's Laws 66. A car rounds a banked curve as shown in Figure 6.6. The radius of curvature of the road is R, the banking angle is , and the coefficient of static friction is s . (a) Determine the range of speeds the car can have without slipping up or down the banked surface. (b) Find the minimum value for s such that the minimum speed is zero. (c) What is the range of speeds possible if R 100 m, 10.0, and s 0.100 (slippery conditions)? 67. A single bead can slide with negligible friction on a wire that is bent into a circle of radius 15.0 cm, as in Figure P6.67. The circle is always in a vertical plane and rotates steadily about its vertical diameter with a period of 0.450 s. The position of the bead is described by the angle that the radial line from the center of the loop to the bead makes with the vertical. (a) At what angle up from the lowest point can the bead stay motionless relative to the turning circle? (b) Repeat the problem if the period of the circle's rotation is 0.850 s. if R 4.00 m and s 0.400. How many revolutions per minute does the cylinder make? 64. An example of the Coriolis effect. Suppose air resistance is negligible for a golf ball. A golfer tees off from a location precisely at i 35.0 north latitude. He hits the ball due south, with range 285 m. The ball's initial velocity is at 48.0 above the horizontal. (a) For what length of time is the ball in flight? The cup is due south of the golfer 's location, and he would have a hole-inone if the Earth were not rotating. As shown in Figure P6.64, the Earth's rotation makes the tee move in a circle of radius RE cos i (6.37 106 m) cos 35.0, completing one revolution each day. (b) Find the eastward speed of the tee, relative to the stars. The hole is also moving eastward, but it is 285 m farther south and thus at a slightly lower latitude f . Because the hole moves eastward in a slightly larger circle, its speed must be greater than that of the tee. (c) By how much does the hole's speed exceed that of the tee? During the time the ball is in flight, it moves both upward and downward, as well as southward with the projectile motion you studied in Chapter 4, but it also moves eastward with the speed you found in part (b). The hole moves to the east at a faster speed, however, pulling ahead of the ball with the relative speed you found in part (c). (d) How far to the west of the hole does the ball land? Golf ball trajectory R E cos i i Figure P6.67 68. The expression F arv br 2v 2 gives the magnitude of the resistive force (in newtons) exerted on a sphere of radius r (in meters) by a stream of air moving at speed v (in meters per second), where a and b are constants with appropriate SI units. Their numerical values are a 3.10 10 4 and b 0.870. Using this formula, find the terminal speed for water droplets falling under their own weight in air, taking the following values for the drop radii: (a) 10.0 m, (b) 100 m, (c) 1.00 mm. Note that for (a) and (c) you can obtain accurate answers without solving a quadratic equation, by considering which of the two contributions to the air resistance is dominant and ignoring the lesser contribution. 69. A model airplane of mass 0.750 kg flies in a horizontal circle at the end of a 60.0-m control wire, with a speed of 35.0 m/s. Compute the tension in the wire if it makes a constant angle of 20.0 with the horizontal. The forces exerted on the airplane are the pull of the control wire, Figure P6.64 65. A curve in a road forms part of a horizontal circle. As a car goes around it at constant speed 14.0 m/s, the total force exerted on the driver has magnitude 130 N. What are the magnitude and direction of the total force exerted on the driver if the speed is 18.0 m/s instead? Answers to Quick Quizzes its own weight, and aerodynamic lift, which acts at 20.0 inward from the vertical as shown in Figure P6.69. Flift 181 20.0 stable spread position" versus the time of fall t. (a) Convert the distances in feet into meters. (b) Graph d (in meters) versus t. (c) Determine the value of the terminal speed vt by finding the slope of the straight portion of the curve. Use a least-squares fit to determine this slope. t (s) d (ft) 16 62 138 242 366 504 652 808 971 1 138 1 309 1 483 1 657 1 831 2 005 2 179 2 353 2 527 2 701 2 875 20.0 T mg Figure P6.69 70. A 9.00-kg object starting from rest falls through a viscous medium and experiences a resistive force R bv, where v is the velocity of the object. If the object's speed reaches one-half its terminal speed in 5.54 s, (a) determine the terminal speed. (b) At what time is the speed of the object three-fourths the terminal speed? (c) How far has the object traveled in the first 5.54 s of motion? 71. Members of a skydiving club were given the following data to use in planning their jumps. In the table, d is the distance fallen from rest by a sky diver in a "free-fall 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 ANSWERS TO QUICK QUIZZES 6.1 No. The tangential acceleration changes just the speed part of the velocity vector. For the car to move in a circle, the direction of its velocity vector must change, and the only way this can happen is for there to be a centripetal acceleration. 6.2 (a) The ball travels in a circular path that has a larger radius than the original circular path, and so there must be some external force causing the change in the velocity vector's direction. The external force must not be as strong as the original tension in the string because if it were, the ball would follow the original path. (b) The ball again travels in an arc, implying some kind of external force. As in part (a), the external force is directed toward the center of the new arc and not toward the center of the original circular path. (c) The ball undergoes an abrupt change in velocity -- from tangent to the circle to perpendicular to it -- and so must have experienced a large force that had one component opposite the ball's velocity (tangent to the circle) and another component radially outward. (d) The ball travels in a straight line tangent to the original path. If there is an external force, it cannot have a component perpendicular to this line because if it did, the path would curve. In fact, if the string breaks and there is no other force acting on the ball, Newton's first law says the ball will travel along such a tangent line at constant speed. 6.3 At the path is along the circumference of the larger circle. Therefore, the wire must be exerting a force on the bead directed toward the center of the circle. Because the speed is constant, there is no tangential force component. At the path is not curved, and so the wire exerts no force on the bead. At the path is again curved, and so the wire is again exerting a force on the bead. This time the force is directed toward the center of the smaller circle. Because the radius of this circle is smaller, the magnitude of the force exerted on the bead is larger here than at . P U Z Z L E R Chum salmon "climbing a ladder" in the McNeil River in Alaska. Why are fish ladders like this often built around dams? Do the ladders reduce the amount of work that the fish must do to get past the dam? (Daniel J. Cox/Tony Stone Images) c h a p t e r Work and Kinetic Energy Chapter Outline 7.1 7.2 7.3 7.4 Work Done by a Constant Force The Scalar Product of Two Vectors Work Done by a Varying Force Kinetic Energy and the Work Kinetic Energy Theorem 7.6 (Optional) Energy and the Automobile 7.7 (Optional) Kinetic Energy at High Speeds 7.5 Power 182 7.1 Work Done by a Constant Force 183 T he concept of energy is one of the most important topics in science and engineering. In everyday life, we think of energy in terms of fuel for transportation and heating, electricity for lights and appliances, and foods for consumption. However, these ideas do not really define energy. They merely tell us that fuels are needed to do a job and that those fuels provide us with something we call energy. In this chapter, we first introduce the concept of work. Work is done by a force acting on an object when the point of application of that force moves through some distance and the force has a component along the line of motion. Next, we define kinetic energy, which is energy an object possesses because of its motion. In general, we can think of energy as the capacity that an object has for performing work. We shall see that the concepts of work and kinetic energy can be applied to the dynamics of a mechanical system without resorting to Newton's laws. In a complex situation, in fact, the "energy approach" can often allow a much simpler analysis than the direct application of Newton's second law. However, it is important to note that the work energy concepts are based on Newton's laws and therefore allow us to make predictions that are always in agreement with these laws. This alternative method of describing motion is especially useful when the force acting on a particle varies with the position of the particle. In this case, the acceleration is not constant, and we cannot apply the kinematic equations developed in Chapter 2. Often, a particle in nature is subject to a force that varies with the position of the particle. Such forces include the gravitational force and the force exerted on an object attached to a spring. Although we could analyze situations like these by applying numerical methods such as those discussed in Section 6.5, utilizing the ideas of work and energy is often much simpler. We describe techniques for treating complicated systems with the help of an extremely important theorem called the work kinetic energy theorem, which is the central topic of this chapter. 7.1 5.1 WORK DONE BY A CONSTANT FORCE Almost all the terms we have used thus far -- velocity, acceleration, force, and so on -- convey nearly the same meaning in physics as they do in everyday life. Now, however, we encounter a term whose meaning in physics is distinctly different from its everyday meaning. That new term is work. To understand what work means to the physicist, consider the situation illustrated in Figure 7.1. A force is applied to a chalkboard eraser, and the eraser slides along the tray. If we are interested in how effective the force is in moving the (a) (b) (c) Figure 7.1 An eraser being pushed along a chalkboard tray. (Charles D. Winters) 184 F CHAPTER 7 Work and Kinetic Energy F cos d Figure 7.2 If an object undergoes a displacement d under the action of a constant force F, the work done by the force is (F cos )d. eraser, we need to consider not only the magnitude of the force but also its direction. If we assume that the magnitude of the applied force is the same in all three photographs, it is clear that the push applied in Figure 7.1b does more to move the eraser than the push in Figure 7.1a. On the other hand, Figure 7.1c shows a situation in which the applied force does not move the eraser at all, regardless of how hard it is pushed. (Unless, of course, we apply a force so great that we break something.) So, in analyzing forces to determine the work they do, we must consider the vector nature of forces. We also need to know how far the eraser moves along the tray if we want to determine the work required to cause that motion. Moving the eraser 3 m requires more work than moving it 2 cm. Let us examine the situation in Figure 7.2, where an object undergoes a displacement d along a straight line while acted on by a constant force F that makes an angle with d. Work done by a constant force The work W done on an object by an agent exerting a constant force on the object is the product of the component of the force in the direction of the displacement and the magnitude of the displacement: W Fd cos (7.1) n F mg Figure 7.3 When an object is displaced on a frictionless, horizontal, surface, the normal force n and the force of gravity mg do no work on the object. In the situation shown here, F is the only force doing work on the object. 5.3 As an example of the distinction between this definition of work and our everyday understanding of the word, consider holding a heavy chair at arm's length for 3 min. At the end of this time interval, your tired arms may lead you to think that you have done a considerable amount of work on the chair. According to our definition, however, you have done no work on it whatsoever.1 You exert a force to support the chair, but you do not move it. A force does no work on an object if the object does not move. This can be seen by noting that if d 0, Equation 7.1 gives W 0 -- the situation depicted in Figure 7.1c. Also note from Equation 7.1 that the work done by a force on a moving object is zero when the force applied is perpendicular to the object's displacement. That 90, then W 0 because cos 90 0. For example, in Figure 7.3, the is, if work done by the normal force on the object and the work done by the force of gravity on the object are both zero because both forces are perpendicular to the displacement and have zero components in the direction of d. The sign of the work also depends on the direction of F relative to d. The work done by the applied force is positive when the vector associated with the component F cos is in the same direction as the displacement. For example, when an object is lifted, the work done by the applied force is positive because the direction of that force is upward, that is, in the same direction as the displacement. When the vector associated with the component F cos is in the direction opposite the displacement, W is negative. For example, as an object is lifted, the work done by the gravitational force on the object is negative. The factor cos in the definition of W (Eq. 7.1) automatically takes care of the sign. It is important to note that work is an energy transfer; if energy is transferred to the system (object), W is positive; if energy is transferred from the system, W is negative. 1 Actually, you do work while holding the chair at arm's length because your muscles are continuously contracting and relaxing; this means that they are exerting internal forces on your arm. Thus, work is being done by your body -- but internally on itself rather than on the chair. 7.1 Work Done by a Constant Force 185 If an applied force F acts along the direction of the displacement, then and cos 0 1. In this case, Equation 7.1 gives W Fd 0 Work is a scalar quantity, and its units are force multiplied by length. Therefore, the SI unit of work is the newton meter (N m). This combination of units is used so frequently that it has been given a name of its own: the joule (J). Quick Quiz 7.1 Can the component of a force that gives an object a centripetal acceleration do any work on the object? (One such force is that exerted by the Sun on the Earth that holds the Earth in a circular orbit around the Sun.) In general, a particle may be moving with either a constant or a varying velocity under the influence of several forces. In these cases, because work is a scalar quantity, the total work done as the particle undergoes some displacement is the algebraic sum of the amounts of work done by all the forces. EXAMPLE 7.1 Mr. Clean 50.0 N A man cleaning a floor pulls a vacuum cleaner with a force of magnitude F 50.0 N at an angle of 30.0 with the horizontal (Fig. 7.4a). Calculate the work done by the force on the vacuum cleaner as the vacuum cleaner is displaced 3.00 m to the right. n Because they aid us in clarifying which forces are acting on the object being considered, drawings like Figure 7.4b are helpful when we are gathering information and organizing a solution. For our analysis, we use the definition of work (Eq. 7.1): W (F cos )d (50.0 N)(cos 30.0)(3.00 m) 130 J One thing we should learn from this problem is that the normal force n, the force of gravity Fg mg, and the upward component of the applied force (50.0 N) (sin 30.0) do no work on the vacuum cleaner because these forces are perpendicular to its displacement. 130 N m n Solution 30.0 mg (a) 50.0 N 30.0 y x mg (b) Exercise Answer Find the work done by the man on the vacuum cleaner if he pulls it 3.0 m with a horizontal force of 32 N. 96 J. Figure 7.4 (a) A vacuum cleaner being pulled at an angle of 30.0 with the horizontal. (b) Free-body diagram of the forces acting on the vacuum cleaner. 186 CHAPTER 7 Work and Kinetic Energy d F The weightlifter does no work on the weights as he holds them on his shoulders. (If he could rest the bar on his shoulders and lock his knees, he would be able to support the weights for quite some time.) Did he do any work when he raised the weights to this height? mg h Quick Quiz 7.2 A person lifts a box of mass m a vertical distance h and then walks horizontally a distance d. Figure 7.5 A person lifts a heavy box of mass m a vertical distance h and then walks horizontally a distance d while holding the box, as shown in Figure 7.5. Determine (a) the work he does on the box and (b) the work done on the box by the force of gravity. 7.2 2.6 THE SCALAR PRODUCT OF TWO VECTORS Because of the way the force and displacement vectors are combined in Equation 7.1, it is helpful to use a convenient mathematical tool called the scalar product. This tool allows us to indicate how F and d interact in a way that depends on how close to parallel they happen to be. We write this scalar product F d. (Because of the dot symbol, the scalar product is often called the dot product.) Thus, we can express Equation 7.1 as a scalar product: W Fd Fd cos (7.2) Work expressed as a dot product In other words, F d (read "F dot d") is a shorthand notation for Fd cos . Scalar product of any two vectors A and B In general, the scalar product of any two vectors A and B is a scalar quantity equal to the product of the magnitudes of the two vectors and the cosine of the angle between them: AB AB cos (7.3) This relationship is shown in Figure 7.6. Note that A and B need not have the same units. 7.2 The Scalar Product of Two Vectors 187 In Figure 7.6, B cos is the projection of B onto A. Therefore, Equation 7.3 says that A B is the product of the magnitude of A and the projection of B onto A.2 From the right-hand side of Equation 7.3 we also see that the scalar product is commutative.3 That is, AB that A (B C) AB AC B cos A B BA The order of the dot product can be reversed Finally, the scalar product obeys the distributive law of multiplication, so The dot product is simple to evaluate from Equation 7.3 when A is either perpendicular or parallel to B. If A is perpendicular to B ( 90), then A B 0. (The equality A B = 0 also holds in the more trivial case when either A or B is zero.) If vector A is parallel to vector B and the two point in the same direction 0), then A B AB. If vector A is parallel to vector B but the two point in op( posite directions ( 180), then A B AB. The scalar product is negative when 90 180. The unit vectors i, j, and k, which were defined in Chapter 3, lie in the positive x, y, and z directions, respectively, of a right-handed coordinate system. Therefore, it follows from the definition of A B that the scalar products of these unit vectors are ii ij jj ik kk jk 1 0 (7.4) (7.5) A . B = AB cos Figure 7.6 The scalar product A B equals the magnitude of A multiplied by B cos , which is the projection of B onto A. Dot products of unit vectors Equations 3.18 and 3.19 state that two vectors A and B can be expressed in component vector form as A B Ax i Bx i Ay j By j Az k Bz k Using the information given in Equations 7.4 and 7.5 shows that the scalar product of A and B reduces to AB Ax Bx Ay By Az Bz (7.6) (Details of the derivation are left for you in Problem 7.10.) In the special case in which A B, we see that AA Ax2 Ay2 Az2 A2 Quick Quiz 7.3 If the dot product of two vectors is positive, must the vectors have positive rectangular components? 2 This is equivalent to stating that A B equals the product of the magnitude of B and the projection of A onto B. 3 This may seem obvious, but in Chapter 11 you will see another way of combining vectors that proves useful in physics and is not commutative. 188 CHAPTER 7 Work and Kinetic Energy EXAMPLE 7.2 The Scalar Product i (b) Find the angle between A and B. The vectors A and B are given by A 2i 3j and B 2j. (a) Determine the scalar product A B. Solution Solution AB (2i 2i i 2(1) 2 6 3j) ( i 2i 2j 4(0) 4 2j) 3j i 3(0) 3j 2j 6(1) A B The magnitudes of A and B are Ax2 Bx2 Ay2 By2 (2)2 ( 1)2 4 (3)2 (2)2 13 5 Using Equation 7.3 and the result from part (a) we find that cos A B AB cos 1 4 where we have used the facts that i i j j 1 and i j j i 0. The same result is obtained when we use Equation 7.6 directly, where Ax 2, Ay 3, Bx 1, and By 2. 135 4 8.06 65 60.2 EXAMPLE 7.3 Work Done by a Constant Force A particle moving in the xy plane undergoes a displacement d (2.0i 3.0j) m as a constant force F (5.0i 2.0j) N acts on the particle. (a) Calculate the magnitude of the displacement and that of the force. Solution Substituting the expressions for F and d into Equations 7.4 and 7.5, we obtain W Fd 10 0 (5.0i 0 2.0j) (2.0i 5.0i 3.0j 6 16 N m 3.0j) N m 2.0j 3.0j 16 J 5.0i 2.0i 2.0j 2.0i Solution d F x2 y2 Fy2 (2.0)2 (3.0)2 (2.0)2 3.6 m Fx2 (5.0)2 Exercise 5.4 N Calculate the angle between F and d. 35. Answer (b) Calculate the work done by F. 7.3 5.2 WORK DONE BY A VARYING FORCE Consider a particle being displaced along the x axis under the action of a varying force. The particle is displaced in the direction of increasing x from x xi to x xf . In such a situation, we cannot use W (F cos )d to calculate the work done by the force because this relationship applies only when F is constant in magnitude and direction. However, if we imagine that the particle undergoes a very small displacement x, shown in Figure 7.7a, then the x component of the force Fx is approximately constant over this interval; for this small displacement, we can express the work done by the force as W Fx x This is just the area of the shaded rectangle in Figure 7.7a. If we imagine that the Fx versus x curve is divided into a large number of such intervals, then the total work done for the displacement from xi to xf is approximately equal to the sum of a large number of such terms: xf W xi Fx x 7.3 Area = A = Fx x Fx Work Done by a Varying Force 189 Fx x (a) The work done by the force component Fx for the small displacement x is Fx x, which equals the area of the shaded rectangle. The total work done for the displacement from x i to xf is approximately equal to the sum of the areas of all the rectangles. (b) The work done by the component Fx of the varying force as the particle moves from xi to xf is exactly equal to the area under this curve. Figure 7.7 xi x (a) Fx xf Work xi (b) xf x If the displacements are allowed to approach zero, then the number of terms in the sum increases without limit but the value of the sum approaches a definite value equal to the area bounded by the Fx curve and the x axis: xf xf lim x :0 x i Fx x xi Fx dx This definite integral is numerically equal to the area under the Fx -versus-x curve between xi and xf . Therefore, we can express the work done by Fx as the particle moves from xi to xf as xf W xi Fx dx (7.7) Work done by a varying force This equation reduces to Equation 7.1 when the component Fx F cos is constant. If more than one force acts on a particle, the total work done is just the work done by the resultant force. If we express the resultant force in the x direction as Fx , then the total work, or net work, done as the particle moves from xi to xf is xf W Wnet xi Fx dx (7.8) EXAMPLE 7.4 Calculating Total Work Done from a Graph A force acting on a particle varies with x, as shown in Figure 7.8. Calculate the work done by the force as the particle moves from x 0 to x 6.0 m. Solution The work done by the force is equal to the area under the curve from xA 0 to x C 6.0 m. This area is equal to the area of the rectangular section from to plus 190 Fx(N) 5 CHAPTER 7 Work and Kinetic Energy the area of the triangular section from to . The area of the rectangle is (4.0)(5.0) N m 20 J, and the area of the 1 triangle is 2(2.0)(5.0) N m 5.0 J. Therefore, the total work done is 25 J. 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 x(m) Figure 7.8 The force acting on a particle is constant for the first 4.0 m of motion and then decreases linearly with x from x B 4.0 m to x C 6.0 m. The net work done by this force is the area under the curve. EXAMPLE 7.5 Work Done by the Sun on a Probe work is done by the Sun on the probe as the probe Sun separation changes from 1.5 1011 m to 2.3 1011 m. The interplanetary probe shown in Figure 7.9a is attracted to the Sun by a force of magnitude F 1.3 1022/x 2 where x is the distance measured outward from the Sun to the probe. Graphically and analytically determine how much Mars's orbit Sun Earth's orbit Graphical Solution The minus sign in the formula for the force indicates that the probe is attracted to the Sun. Because the probe is moving away from the Sun, we expect to calculate a negative value for the work done on it. A spreadsheet or other numerical means can be used to generate a graph like that in Figure 7.9b. Each small square of the grid corresponds to an area (0.05 N)(0.1 1011 m) 5 108 N m. The work done is equal to the shaded area in Figure 7.9b. Because there are approximately 60 squares shaded, the total area (which is negative because it is below the x axis) is about 3 1010 N m. This is the work done by the Sun on the probe. (a) 0.0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.9 1.0 F(N) (b) 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 1011 x(m) Figure 7.9 (a) An interplanetary probe moves from a position near the Earth's orbit radially outward from the Sun, ending up near the orbit of Mars. (b) Attractive force versus distance for the interplanetary probe. 7.3 Work Done by a Varying Force 191 Analytical Solution We can use Equation 7.7 to calculate a more precise value for the work done on the probe by the Sun. To solve this integral, we use the first formula of Table B.5 in Appendix B with n 2: 2.3 1011 ( 1.3 3.0 1022) 1010 J 2.3 1 1011 1.5 1 1011 W 1.5 1.3 x2 1022 2.3 1011 1011 dx x 2 Exercise dx Does it matter whether the path of the probe is not directed along a radial line away from the Sun? No; the value of W depends only on the initial and final positions, not on the path taken between these points. ( 1.3 ( 1.3 1022) 1.5 1011 1) Answer 2.3 1011 1022)( x 1.5 1011 Work Done by a Spring 5.3 A common physical system for which the force varies with position is shown in Figure 7.10. A block on a horizontal, frictionless surface is connected to a spring. If the spring is either stretched or compressed a small distance from its unstretched (equilibrium) configuration, it exerts on the block a force of magnitude Fs kx (7.9) Spring force where x is the displacement of the block from its unstretched (x 0) position and k is a positive constant called the force constant of the spring. In other words, the force required to stretch or compress a spring is proportional to the amount of stretch or compression x. This force law for springs, known as Hooke's law, is valid only in the limiting case of small displacements. The value of k is a measure of the stiffness of the spring. Stiff springs have large k values, and soft springs have small k values. Quick Quiz 7.4 What are the units for k, the force constant in Hooke's law? The negative sign in Equation 7.9 signifies that the force exerted by the spring is always directed opposite the displacement. When x 0 as in Figure 7.10a, the spring force is directed to the left, in the negative x direction. When x 0 as in Figure 7.10c, the spring force is directed to the right, in the positive x direction. When x 0 as in Figure 7.10b, the spring is unstretched and Fs 0. Because the spring force always acts toward the equilibrium position (x 0), it sometimes is called a restoring force. If the spring is compressed until the block is at the point x max and is then released, the block moves from x max through zero to x max. If the spring is instead stretched until the block is at the point x max and is then released, the block moves from x max through zero to x max. It then reverses direction, returns to x max, and continues oscillating back and forth. Suppose the block has been pushed to the left a distance x max from equilibrium and is then released. Let us calculate the work Ws done by the spring force as the block moves from xi x max to xf 0. Applying Equation 7.7 and assuming the block may be treated as a particle, we obtain xf 0 Ws xi Fs dx ( kx)dx x max 1 2 2 kxmax (7.10) 192 CHAPTER 7 Work and Kinetic Energy Fs is negative. x is positive. x x x=0 (a) Fs = 0 x=0 x x=0 (b) Fs is positive. x is negative. x x x=0 (c) Fs 1 Area = kx 2max 2 kx max 0 xmax Fs = kx x (d) Figure 7.10 The force exerted by a spring on a block varies with the block's displacement x from the equilibrium position x 0. (a) When x is positive (stretched spring), the spring force is directed to the left. (b) When x is zero (natural length of the spring), the spring force is zero. (c) When x is negative (compressed spring), the spring force is directed to the right. (d) Graph of Fs versus x for the block spring system. The work done by the spring force as the block moves from x max to 0 is the area of the shaded triangle, 1 kx 2 . max 2 where we have used the indefinite integral x ndx x n 1/(n 1) with n 1. The work done by the spring force is positive because the force is in the same direction as the displacement (both are to the right). When we consider the work done by the spring force as the block moves from xi 0 to xf x max, we find that 7.3 Work Done by a Varying Force 193 1 2 Ws 2 kx max because for this part of the motion the displacement is to the right and the spring force is to the left. Therefore, the net work done by the spring force as the block moves from xi x max to xf x max is zero. Figure 7.10d is a plot of Fs versus x. The work calculated in Equation 7.10 is the area of the shaded triangle, corresponding to the displacement from x max to 0. Because the triangle has base x max and height kx max, its area is 1 kx2 , the work 2 max done by the spring as given by Equation 7.10. If the block undergoes an arbitrary displacement from x xi to x xf , the work done by the spring force is xf Ws ( kx)dx xi 1 2 2 kxi 1 2 2 kxf (7.11) Work done by a spring For example, if the spring has a force constant of 80 N/m and is compressed 3.0 cm from equilibrium, the work done by the spring force as the block moves from xi 3.0 cm to its unstretched position xf 0 is 3.6 10 2 J. From Equation 7.11 we also see that the work done by the spring force is zero for any motion that ends where it began (xi xf ). We shall make use of this important result in Chapter 8, in which we describe the motion of this system in greater detail. Equations 7.10 and 7.11 describe the work done by the spring on the block. Now let us consider the work done on the spring by an external agent that stretches the spring very slowly from xi 0 to xf x max, as in Figure 7.11. We can calculate this work by noting that at any value of the displacement, the applied force Fapp is equal to and opposite the spring force Fs , so that Fapp ( kx) kx. Therefore, the work done by this applied force (the external agent) is x max x max Fs Fapp xi = 0 xf = x max WFapp 0 Fapp dx kx dx 0 1 2 2 kx max Figure 7.11 A block being pulled from xi 0 to xf x max on a frictionless surface by a force Fapp . If the process is carried out very slowly, the applied force is equal to and opposite the spring force at all times. This work is equal to the negative of the work done by the spring force for this displacement. EXAMPLE 7.6 Measuring k for a Spring A common technique used to measure the force constant of a spring is described in Figure 7.12. The spring is hung vertically, and an object of mass m is attached to its lower end. Under the action of the "load" mg, the spring stretches a distance d from its equilibrium position. Because the spring force is upward (opposite the displacement), it must balance the downward force of gravity m g when the system is at rest. In this case, we can apply Hooke's law to give Fs kd mg, or k mg d Fs d For example, if a spring is stretched 2.0 cm by a suspended object having a mass of 0.55 kg, then the force constant is k mg d (0.55 kg)(9.80 m/s2) 2.0 10 2 m 2.7 102 N/m mg (a) (b) (c) Figure 7.12 Determining the force constant k of a spring. The elongation d is caused by the attached object, which has a weight mg. Because the spring force balances the force of gravity, it follows that k mg/d. 194 CHAPTER 7 Work and Kinetic Energy 7.4 KINETIC ENERGY AND THE WORK KINETIC ENERGY THEOREM 5.7 d F m vi vf It can be difficult to use Newton's second law to solve motion problems involving complex forces. An alternative approach is to relate the speed of a moving particle to its displacement under the influence of some net force. If the work done by the net force on a particle can be calculated for a given displacement, then the change in the particle's speed can be easily evaluated. Figure 7.13 shows a particle of mass m moving to the right under the action of a constant net force F. Because the force is constant, we know from Newton's second law that the particle moves with a constant acceleration a. If the particle is displaced a distance d, the net work done by the total force F is W F d (ma)d (7.12) Figure 7.13 A particle undergoing a displacement d and a change in velocity under the action of a constant net force F. In Chapter 2 we found that the following relationships are valid when a particle undergoes constant acceleration: d 1 2 (vi vf )t a vf t vi where vi is the speed at t 0 and vf is the speed at time t. Substituting these expressions into Equation 7.12 gives W W 1 2 2 mv m vf t vi 1 2 (vi vf)t (7.13) 1 2 2 mvf 1 2 2 mvi The quantity represents the energy associated with the motion of the particle. This quantity is so important that it has been given a special name -- kinetic energy. The net work done on a particle by a constant net force F acting on it equals the change in kinetic energy of the particle. In general, the kinetic energy K of a particle of mass m moving with a speed v is defined as Kinetic energy is energy associated with the motion of a body K 1 2 2 mv (7.14) TABLE 7.1 Kinetic Energies for Various Objects Object Earth orbiting the Sun Moon orbiting the Earth Rocket moving at escape speeda Automobile at 55 mi/h Running athlete Stone dropped from 10 m Golf ball at terminal speed Raindrop at terminal speed Oxygen molecule in air a Mass (kg) 5.98 1024 7.35 1022 500 2 000 70 1.0 0.046 3.5 10 5 5.3 10 26 Speed (m/s) Kinetic Energy ( J) 2.98 104 1.02 103 1.12 104 25 10 14 44 9.0 500 2.65 3.82 3.14 6.3 3.5 9.8 4.5 1.4 6.6 1033 1028 1010 105 103 101 101 10 3 10 21 Escape speed is the minimum speed an object must attain near the Earth's surface if it is to escape the Earth's gravitational force. 7.4 Kinetic Energy and the Work -- Kinetic Energy Theorem 195 5.4 Kinetic energy is a scalar quantity and has the same units as work. For example, a 2.0-kg object moving with a speed of 4.0 m/s has a kinetic energy of 16 J. Table 7.1 lists the kinetic energies for various objects. It is often convenient to write Equation 7.13 in the form W Kf Ki K (7.15) Work kinetic energy theorem That is, Ki W Kf . Equation 7.15 is an important result known as the work kinetic energy theorem. It is important to note that when we use this theorem, we must include all of the forces that do work on the particle in the calculation of the net work done. From this theorem, we see that the speed of a particle increases if the net work done on it is positive because the final kinetic energy is greater than the initial kinetic energy. The particle's speed decreases if the net work done is negative because the final kinetic energy is less than the initial kinetic energy. The work kinetic energy theorem as expressed by Equation 7.15 allows us to think of kinetic energy as the work a particle can do in coming to rest, or the amount of energy stored in the particle. For example, suppose a hammer (our particle) is on the verge of striking a nail, as shown in Figure 7.14. The moving hammer has kinetic energy and so can do work on the nail. The work done on the nail is equal to Fd, where F is the average force exerted on the nail by the hammer and d is the distance the nail is driven into the wall.4 We derived the work kinetic energy theorem under the assumption of a constant net force, but it also is valid when the force varies. To see this, suppose the net force acting on a particle in the x direction is Fx . We can apply Newton's second law, Fx max , and use Equation 7.8 to express the net work done as xf xf W xi Fx dx xi max dx If the resultant force varies with x, the acceleration and speed also depend on x. Because we normally consider acceleration as a function of t, we now use the following chain rule to express a in a slightly different way: a dv dt xf dv dx dx dt v dv dx Substituting this expression for a into the above equation for W gives W xi Figure 7.14 The moving hammer has kinetic energy and thus can do work on the nail, driving it into the wall. mv W dv dx dx vf mv dv vi 1 2 2 mv i 1 2 2 mv f (7.16) The limits of the integration were changed from x values to v values because the variable was changed from x to v. Thus, we conclude that the net work done on a particle by the net force acting on it is equal to the change in the kinetic energy of the particle. This is true whether or not the net force is constant. 4 The net work done on a particle equals the change in its kinetic energy Note that because the nail and the hammer are systems of particles rather than single particles, part of the hammer's kinetic energy goes into warming the hammer and the nail upon impact. Also, as the nail moves into the wall in response to the impact, the large frictional force between the nail and the wood results in the continuous transformation of the kinetic energy of the nail into further temperature increases in the nail and the wood, as well as in deformation of the wall. Energy associated with temperature changes is called internal energy and will be studied in detail in Chapter 20. 196 CHAPTER 7 Work and Kinetic Energy Situations Involving Kinetic Friction One way to include frictional forces in analyzing the motion of an object sliding on a horizontal surface is to describe the kinetic energy lost because of friction. Suppose a book moving on a horizontal surface is given an initial horizontal velocity vi and slides a distance d before reaching a final velocity vf as shown in Figure 7.15. The external force that causes the book to undergo an acceleration in the negative x direction is the force of kinetic friction fk acting to the left, opposite the motion. The initial kinetic energy of the book is 1 mvi2, and its final kinetic energy 2 is 1 mvf 2 . Applying Newton's second law to the book can show this. Because the 2 only force acting on the book in the x direction is the friction force, Newton's second law gives fk max . Multiplying both sides of this expression by d and using Equation 2.12 in the form vxf 2 vxi2 2ax d for motion under constant accelerafkd (max)d 1 mvxf 2 1 mvxi2 or tion give 2 2 Loss in kinetic energy due to friction Kfriction fk d (7.17a) d vi fk vf This result specifies that the amount by which the force of kinetic friction changes the kinetic energy of the book is equal to fk d. Part of this lost kinetic energy goes into warming up the book, and the rest goes into warming up the surface over which the book slides. In effect, the quantity fk d is equal to the work done by kinetic friction on the book plus the work done by kinetic friction on the surface. (We shall study the relationship between temperature and energy in Part III of this text.) When friction -- as well as other forces -- acts on an object, the work kinetic energy theorem reads Ki Wother fk d Kf (7.17b) Figure 7.15 A book sliding to the right on a horizontal surface slows down in the presence of a force of kinetic friction acting to the left. The initial velocity of the book is vi , and its final velocity is vf . The normal force and the force of gravity are not included in the diagram because they are perpendicular to the direction of motion and therefore do not influence the book's velocity. Here, Wother represents the sum of the amounts of work done on the object by forces other than kinetic friction. Quick Quiz 7.5 Can frictional forces ever increase an object's kinetic energy? EXAMPLE 7.7 A Block Pulled on a Frictionless Surface A 6.0-kg block initially at rest is pulled to the right along a horizontal, frictionless surface by a constant horizontal force of 12 N. Find the speed of the block after it has moved 3.0 m. Solution We have made a drawing of this situation in Figure 7.16a. We could apply the equations of kinematics to determine the answer, but let us use the energy approach for n vf F n vf fk F d mg (a) d mg (b) Figure 7.16 A block pulled to the right by a constant horizontal force. (a) Frictionless surface. (b) Rough surface. 7.4 Kinetic Energy and the Work Kinetic Energy Theorem 2W m 2(36 J) 6.0 kg 197 practice. The normal force balances the force of gravity on the block, and neither of these vertically acting forces does work on the block because the displacement is horizontal. Because there is no friction, the net external force acting on the block is the 12-N force. The work done by this force is W Fd (12 N)(3.0 m) 36 N m 36 J vf 2 vf 12 m2/s2 3.5 m/s Exercise Using the work kinetic energy theorem and noting that the initial kinetic energy is zero, we obtain W Kf Ki 1 2 2 mvf Find the acceleration of the block and determine its final speed, using the kinematics equation vxf 2 vxi2 2ax d. ax 2.0 m/s2; vf 3.5 m/s. 0 Answer EXAMPLE 7.8 A Block Pulled on a Rough Surface 0 vf 2 36 J 26.5 J 1 2 Find the final speed of the block described in Example 7.7 if the surface is not frictionless but instead has a coefficient of kinetic friction of 0.15. (6.0 kg) vf 2 3.18 m2/s2 2(9.5 J)/(6.0 kg) vf 1.8 m/s Solution 7.7: The applied force does work just as in Example W Fd (12 N)(3.0 m) 36 J In this case we must use Equation 7.17a to calculate the kinetic energy lost to friction K friction . The magnitude of the frictional force is fk kn k mg After sliding the 3-m distance on the rough surface, the block is moving at a speed of 1.8 m/s; in contrast, after covering the same distance on a frictionless surface (see Example 7.7), its speed was 3.5 m/s. Exercise (0.15)(6.0 kg)(9.80 m/s2) 8.82 N The change in kinetic energy due to friction is K friction 1 2 Find the acceleration of the block from Newton's second law and determine its final speed, using equations of kinematics. ax 0.53 m/s2; vf 1.8 m/s. fk d (8.82 N)(3.0 m) 26.5 J Answer The final speed of the block follows from Equation 7.17b: mvi2 Wother fk d 1 2 mvf 2 CONCEPTUAL EXAMPLE 7.9 Does the Ramp Lessen the Work Required? A man wishes to load a refrigerator onto a truck using a ramp, as shown in Figure 7.17. He claims that less work would be required to load the truck if the length L of the ramp were increased. Is his statement valid? Solution No. Although less force is required with a longer ramp, that force must act over a greater distance if the same amount of work is to be done. Suppose the refrigerator is wheeled on a dolly up the ramp at constant speed. The L Figure 7.17 A refrigerator attached to a frictionless wheeled dolly is moved up a ramp at constant speed. 198 CHAPTER 7 Work and Kinetic Energy the refrigerator mg times the vertical height h through which mgh. (The miit is displaced times cos 180, or W by gravity nus sign arises because the downward force of gravity is opposite the displacement.) Thus, the man must do work mgh on the refrigerator, regardless of the length of the ramp. normal force exerted by the ramp on the refrigerator is directed 90 to the motion and so does no work on the refrigerator. Because K 0, the work kinetic energy theorem gives W Wby man Wby gravity 0 The work done by the force of gravity equals the weight of QuickLab Attach two paperclips to a ruler so that one of the clips is twice the distance from the end as the other. Place the ruler on a table with two small wads of paper against the clips, which act as stops. Sharply swing the ruler through a small angle, stopping it abruptly with your finger. The outer paper wad will have twice the speed of the inner paper wad as the two slide on the table away from the ruler. Compare how far the two wads slide. How does this relate to the results of Conceptual Example 7.10? Consider the chum salmon attempting to swim upstream in the photograph at the beginning of this chapter. The "steps" of a fish ladder built around a dam do not change the total amount of work that must be done by the salmon as they leap through some vertical distance. However, the ladder allows the fish to perform that work in a series of smaller jumps, and the net effect is to raise the vertical position of the fish by the height of the dam. Crumpled wads of paper Paperclips These cyclists are working hard and expending energy as they pedal uphill in Marin County, CA. CONCEPTUAL EXAMPLE 7.10 Useful Physics for Safer Driving same for both speeds. The net force multiplied by the displacement of the car is equal to the initial kinetic energy of the car (because Kf 0). If the speed is doubled, as it is in this example, the kinetic energy is quadrupled. For a given constant applied force (in this case, the frictional force), the distance traveled is four times as great when the initial speed is doubled, and so the estimated distance that the car slides is 4d. A certain car traveling at an initial speed v slides a distance d to a halt after its brakes lock. Assuming that the car's initial speed is instead 2v at the moment the brakes lock, estimate the distance it slides. Solution Let us assume that the force of kinetic friction between the car and the road surface is constant and the 7.5 Power 199 EXAMPLE 7.11 A Block Spring System A block of mass 1.6 kg is attached to a horizontal spring that has a force constant of 1.0 103 N/m, as shown in Figure 7.10. The spring is compressed 2.0 cm and is then released from rest. (a) Calculate the speed of the block as it passes through the equilibrium position x 0 if the surface is frictionless. In this situation, the block starts with vi 0 at xi 2.0 cm, and we want to find vf at xf 0. We use Equation 7.10 to find the work done by the spring with xmax xi 2.0 cm 2.0 10 2 m: Ws 1 2 2 kx max 1 2 (1.0 Solution Certainly, the answer has to be less than what we found in part (a) because the frictional force retards the motion. We use Equation 7.17 to calculate the kinetic energy lost because of friction and add this negative value to the kinetic energy found in the absence of friction. The kinetic energy lost due to friction is K fk d (4.0 N)(2.0 10 2 Solution m) 0.080 J In part (a), the final kinetic energy without this loss was found to be 0.20 J. Therefore, the final kinetic energy in the presence of friction is Kf 1 2 (1.6 103 N/m)( 2.0 10 2 m)2 0.20 J 0.20 J 0.12 J 0.24 J 1.6 kg 0.080 J 0.12 J 1 2 2 mvf Using the work kinetic energy theorem with vi 0, we obtain the change in kinetic energy of the block due to the work done on it by the spring: Ws 0.20 J vf 2 vf 1 2 2 mvf 1 2 (1.6 1 2 2 mvi kg)vf 2 vf 2 vf 0.15 m2/s2 kg)vf 2 0 0.39 m/s 0.40 J 1.6 kg 0.25 m2/s2 0.50 m/s As expected, this value is somewhat less than the 0.50 m/s we found in part (a). If the frictional force were greater, then the value we obtained as our answer would have been even smaller. (b) Calculate the speed of the block as it passes through the equilibrium position if a constant frictional force of 4.0 N retards its motion from the moment it is released. 7.5 5.8 POWER Imagine two identical models of an automobile: one with a base-priced four-cylinder engine; and the other with the highest-priced optional engine, a mighty eightcylinder powerplant. Despite the differences in engines, the two cars have the same mass. Both cars climb a roadway up a hill, but the car with the optional engine takes much less time to reach the top. Both cars have done the same amount of work against gravity, but in different time periods. From a practical viewpoint, it is interesting to know not only the work done by the vehicles but also the rate at which it is done. In taking the ratio of the amount of work done to the time taken to do it, we have a way of quantifying this concept. The time rate of doing work is called power. If an external force is applied to an object (which we assume acts as a particle), and if the work done by this force in the time interval t is W, then the average power expended during this interval is defined as W t The work done on the object contributes to the increase in the energy of the object. Therefore, a more general definition of power is the time rate of energy transfer. In a manner similar to how we approached the definition of velocity and acceleraAverage power 200 CHAPTER 7 Work and Kinetic Energy tion, we can define the instantaneous power age power as t approaches zero: lim t:0 as the limiting value of the averdW dt W t where we have represented the increment of work done by dW. We find from Equation 7.2, letting the displacement be expressed as ds, that dW F ds. Therefore, the instantaneous power can be written Instantaneous power dW dt F ds dt F v (7.18) where we use the fact that v ds/dt. The SI unit of power is joules per second (J/s), also called the watt (W) (after James Watt, the inventor of the steam engine): The watt 1W 1 J/s 1 kg m2/s3 The symbol W (not italic) for watt should not be confused with the symbol W (italic) for work. A unit of power in the British engineering system is the horsepower (hp): 1 hp 746 W A unit of energy (or work) can now be defined in terms of the unit of power. One kilowatt hour (kWh) is the energy converted or consumed in 1 h at the constant rate of 1 kW 1 000 J/s. The numerical value of 1 kWh is The kilowatt hour is a unit of energy 1 kWh (103 W)(3 600 s) 3.60 106 J It is important to realize that a kilowatt hour is a unit of energy, not power. When you pay your electric bill, you pay the power company for the total electrical energy you used during the billing period. This energy is the power used multiplied by the time during which it was used. For example, a 300-W lightbulb run for 12 h would convert (0.300 kW)(12 h) 3.6 kWh of electrical energy. Quick Quiz 7.6 Suppose that an old truck and a sports car do the same amount of work as they climb a hill but that the truck takes much longer to accomplish this work. How would graphs of versus t compare for the two vehicles? EXAMPLE 7.12 Power Delivered by an Elevator Motor a free-body diagram in Figure 7.18b and have arbitrarily specified that the upward direction is positive. From Newton's second law we obtain Fy T f Mg 0 An elevator car has a mass of 1 000 kg and is carrying passengers having a combined mass of 800 kg. A constant frictional force of 4 000 N retards its motion upward, as shown in Figure 7.18a. (a) What must be the minimum power delivered by the motor to lift the elevator car at a constant speed of 3.00 m/s? where M is the total mass of the system (car plus passengers), equal to 1 800 kg. Therefore, T f Mg 103 N 104 N (1.80 103 kg)(9.80 m/s2) 4.00 2.16 Solution The motor must supply the force of magnitude T that pulls the elevator car upward. Reading that the speed is constant provides the hint that a 0, and therefore we know from Newton's second law that Fy 0. We have drawn 7.6 Using Equation 7.18 and the fact that T is in the same direction as v, we find that Tv (2.16 Tv 104 N)(3.00 m/s) 6.48 104 W Energy and the Automobile 201 long as the speed is less than /T 2.77 m/s, but it is greater when the elevator's speed exceeds this value. Motor T (b) What power must the motor deliver at the instant its speed is v if it is designed to provide an upward acceleration of 1.00 m/s2? + Solution Now we expect to obtain a value greater than we did in part (a), where the speed was constant, because the motor must now perform the additional task of accelerating the car. The only change in the setup of the problem is that now a 0. Applying Newton's second law to the car gives Fy T T M(a (1.80 2.34 f Mg g) 104 f 9.80)m/s2 4.00 103 N Mg Ma f 103 kg)(1.00 N Therefore, using Equation 7.18, we obtain for the required power Tv (2.34 104v) W (a) (b) where v is the instantaneous speed of the car in meters per second. The power is less than that obtained in part (a) as Figure 7.18 (a) The motor exerts an upward force T on the elevator car. The magnitude of this force is the tension T in the cable connecting the car and motor. The downward forces acting on the car are a frictional force f and the force of gravity Fg Mg. (b) The free-body diagram for the elevator car. CONCEPTUAL EXAMPLE 7.13 In part (a) of the preceding example, the motor delivers power to lift the car, and yet the car moves at constant speed. A student analyzing this situation notes that the kinetic energy of the car does not change because its speed does not change. This student then reasons that, according to the work kinetic energy theorem, W K 0. Knowing that W/t, the student concludes that the power delivered by the motor also must be zero. How would you explain this apparent paradox? Solution The work kinetic energy theorem tells us that the net force acting on the system multiplied by the displacement is equal to the change in the kinetic energy of the system. In our elevator case, the net force is indeed zero (that is, T Mg f 0), and so W ( F y)d 0. However, the power from the motor is calculated not from the net force but rather from the force exerted by the motor acting in the direction of motion, which in this case is T and not zero. Optional Section 7.6 ENERGY AND THE AUTOMOBILE Automobiles powered by gasoline engines are very inefficient machines. Even under ideal conditions, less than 15% of the chemical energy in the fuel is used to power the vehicle. The situation is much worse under stop-and-go driving conditions in a city. In this section, we use the concepts of energy, power, and friction to analyze automobile fuel consumption. 202 CHAPTER 7 Work and Kinetic Energy Many mechanisms contribute to energy loss in an automobile. About 67% of the energy available from the fuel is lost in the engine. This energy ends up in the atmosphere, partly via the exhaust system and partly via the cooling system. (As we shall see in Chapter 22, the great energy loss from the exhaust and cooling systems is required by a fundamental law of thermodynamics.) Approximately 10% of the available energy is lost to friction in the transmission, drive shaft, wheel and axle bearings, and differential. Friction in other moving parts dissipates approximately 6% of the energy, and 4% of the energy is used to operate fuel and oil pumps and such accessories as power steering and air conditioning. This leaves a mere 13% of the available energy to propel the automobile! This energy is used mainly to balance the energy loss due to flexing of the tires and the friction caused by the air, which is more commonly referred to as air resistance. Let us examine the power required to provide a force in the forward direction that balances the combination of the two frictional forces. The coefficient of rolling friction between the tires and the road is about 0.016. For a 1 450-kg car, the weight is 14 200 N and the force of rolling friction has a magnitude of n mg 227 N. As the speed of the car increases, a small reduction in the normal force occurs as a result of a decrease in atmospheric pressure as air flows over the top of the car. (This phenomenon is discussed in Chapter 15.) This reduction in the normal force causes a slight reduction in the force of rolling friction fr with increasing speed, as the data in Table 7.2 indicate. Now let us consider the effect of the resistive force that results from the movement of air past the car. For large objects, the resistive force fa associated with air friction is proportional to the square of the speed (in meters per second; see Section 6.4) and is given by Equation 6.6: fa 1 2D Av2 where D is the drag coefficient, is the density of air, and A is the cross-sectional area of the moving object. We can use this expression to calculate the fa values in Table 7.2, using D 0.50, 1.293 kg/m3, and A 2 m2. The magnitude of the total frictional force ft is the sum of the rolling frictional force and the air resistive force: ft fr fa At low speeds, road friction is the predominant resistive force, but at high speeds air drag predominates, as shown in Table 7.2. Road friction can be decreased by a reduction in tire flexing (for example, by an increase in the air pres- TABLE 7.2 Frictional Forces and Power Requirements for a Typical Car a v (m/s) 0 8.9 17.8 26.8 35.9 44.8 n (N) 14 200 14 100 13 900 13 600 13 200 12 600 fr (N) 227 226 222 218 211 202 fa (N) 0 51 204 465 830 1 293 ft (N) 227 277 426 683 1 041 1 495 ft v (kW) 0 2.5 7.6 18.3 37.3 67.0 is a In this table, n is the normal force, f is road friction, f is air friction, f is total friction, and r a t the power delivered to the wheels. 7.6 Energy and the Automobile 203 sure slightly above recommended values) and by the use of radial tires. Air drag can be reduced through the use of a smaller cross-sectional area and by streamlining the car. Although driving a car with the windows open increases air drag and thus results in a 3% decrease in mileage, driving with the windows closed and the air conditioner running results in a 12% decrease in mileage. The total power needed to maintain a constant speed v is ft v, and it is this power that must be delivered to the wheels. For example, from Table 7.2 we see that at v 26.8 m/s (60 mi/h) the required power is ft v (683 N) 26.8 m s 18.3 kW This power can be broken down into two parts: (1) the power fr v needed to compensate for road friction, and (2) the power fa v needed to compensate for air drag. At v 26.8 m/s, we obtain the values r fr v fa v (218 N) 26.8 (465 N) 26.8 m s m s 5.84 kW 12.5 kW a Note that r a. On the other hand, at v 44.8 m/s (100 mi/h), r 9.05 kW, a 57.9 kW, and 67.0 kW. This shows the importance of air drag at high speeds. EXAMPLE 7.14 Gas Consumed by a Compact Car would supply 1.3 108 J of energy. Because the engine is only 18% efficient, each gallon delivers only (0.18)(1.3 108 J) 2.3 107 J. Hence, the number of gallons used to accelerate the car is Number of gallons 2.9 2.3 105 J 107 J/gal 0.013 gal A compact car has a mass of 800 kg, and its efficiency is rated at 18%. (That is, 18% of the available fuel energy is delivered to the wheels.) Find the amount of gasoline used to accelerate the car from rest to 27 m/s (60 mi/h). Use the fact that the energy equivalent of 1 gal of gasoline is 1.3 108 J. The energy required to accelerate the car from rest to a speed v is its final kinetic energy 1 mv 2: 2 K 1 2 2 mv 1 2 (800 Solution kg)(27 m/s)2 2.9 105 J At cruising speed, this much gasoline is sufficient to propel the car nearly 0.5 mi. This demonstrates the extreme energy requirements of stop-and-start driving. If the engine were 100% efficient, each gallon of gasoline EXAMPLE 7.15 Power Delivered to Wheels 2.2 3.6 108 J 103 s 62 kW Suppose the compact car in Example 7.14 gets 35 mi/gal at 60 mi/h. How much power is delivered to the wheels? Solution By simply canceling units, we determine that the car consumes 60 mi/h 35 mi/gal 1.7 gal/h. Using the fact that each gallon is equivalent to 1.3 108 J, we find that the total power used is (1.7 gal/h)(1.3 108 J/gal) 3.6 103 s/h Because 18% of the available power is used to propel the car, the power delivered to the wheels is (0.18)(62 kW) 11 kW. This is 40% less than the 18.3-kW value obtained for the 1 450-kg car discussed in the text. Vehicle mass is clearly an important factor in power-loss mechanisms. 204 CHAPTER 7 Work and Kinetic Energy EXAMPLE 7.16 Car Accelerating Up a Hill y n x F Consider a car of mass m that is accelerating up a hill, as shown in Figure 7.19. An automotive engineer has measured the magnitude of the total resistive force to be ft (218 0.70v 2) N ft where v is the speed in meters per second. Determine the power the engine must deliver to the wheels as a function of speed. The forces on the car are shown in Figure 7.19, in which F is the force of friction from the road that propels the car; the remaining forces have their usual meaning. Applying Newton's second law to the motion along the road surface, we find that Fx F F ma ma ft mg sin mg sin mg sin ft (218 0.70v2) mvg sin ma mg Solution Figure 7.19 1.0 m/s2, and lated to be mva 10, then the various terms in (1 450 kg)(27 m/s)(1.0 m/s2) 39 kW 67 kW 218v 0.70v 3 52 hp 89 hp 5.9 kW 14 kW 7.9 hp 19 hp 168 hp. (1 450 kg)(27 m/s)(9.80 m/s2)(sin 10) 218(27 m/s) 0.70(27 m/s)3 are calcu- Therefore, the power required to move the car forward is Fv mva mvg sin 218v 0.70v 3 The term mva represents the power that the engine must deliver to accelerate the car. If the car moves at constant speed, this term is zero and the total power requirement is reduced. The term mvg sin is the power required to provide a force to balance a component of the force of gravity as the car moves up the incline. This term would be zero for motion on a horizontal surface. The term 218v is the power required to provide a force to balance road friction, and the term 0.70v 3 is the power needed to do work on the air. If we take m 1 450 kg, v 27 m/s ( 60 mi/h), a Hence, the total power required is 126 kW, or Note that the power requirements for traveling at constant speed on a horizontal surface are only 20 kW, or 27 hp (the sum of the last two terms). Furthermore, if the mass were halved (as in the case of a compact car), then the power required also is reduced by almost the same factor. Optional Section 7.7 KINETIC ENERGY AT HIGH SPEEDS The laws of Newtonian mechanics are valid only for describing the motion of particles moving at speeds that are small compared with the speed of light in a vacuum c ( 3.00 108 m/s). When speeds are comparable to c, the equations of Newtonian mechanics must be replaced by the more general equations predicted by the theory of relativity. One consequence of the theory of relativity is that the kinetic energy of a particle of mass m moving with a speed v is no longer given by K mv 2/2. Instead, one must use the relativistic form of the kinetic energy: Relativistic kinetic energy K mc2 1 1 (v/c)2 1 (7.19) According to this expression, speeds greater than c are not allowed because, as v approaches c, K approaches . This limitation is consistent with experimental ob- Summary 205 servations on subatomic particles, which have shown that no particles travel at speeds greater than c. (In other words, c is the ultimate speed.) From this relativistic point of view, the work kinetic energy theorem says that v can only approach c because it would take an infinite amount of work to attain the speed v c. All formulas in the theory of relativity must reduce to those in Newtonian mechanics at low particle speeds. It is instructive to show that this is the case for the kinetic energy relationship by analyzing Equation 7.19 when v is small compared with c. In this case, we expect K to reduce to the Newtonian expression. We can check this by using the binomial expansion (Appendix B.5) applied to the quantity [1 (v/c)2] 1/2, with v/c V 1. If we let x (v/c)2, the expansion gives (1 1 x)1/2 1 x 2 3 v4 8 c4 3 2 x 8 Making use of this expansion in Equation 7.19 gives K mc2 1 1 2 mv 2 1 2 mv 2 v2 2c2 3 v4 m 2 8 c for v V1 c 1 Thus, we see that the relativistic kinetic energy expression does indeed reduce to the Newtonian expression for speeds that are small compared with c. We shall return to the subject of relativity in Chapter 39. SUMMARY The work done by a constant force F acting on a particle is defined as the product of the component of the force in the direction of the particle's displacement and the magnitude of the displacement. Given a force F that makes an angle with the displacement vector d of a particle acted on by the force, you should be able to determine the work done by F using the equation W Fd cos (7.1) The scalar product (dot product) of two vectors A and B is defined by the relationship AB AB cos (7.3) where the result is a scalar quantity and is the angle between the two vectors. The scalar product obeys the commutative and distributive laws. If a varying force does work on a particle as the particle moves along the x axis from xi to xf , you must use the expression xf W xi Fx dx (7.7) where Fx is the component of force in the x direction. If several forces are acting on the particle, the net work done by all of the forces is the sum of the amounts of work done by all of the forces. 206 CHAPTER 7 Work and Kinetic Energy The kinetic energy of a particle of mass m moving with a speed v (where v is small compared with the speed of light) is K 1 2 2 mv (7.14) The work kinetic energy theorem states that the net work done on a particle by external forces equals the change in kinetic energy of the particle: W Kf Ki 1 2 2 mvf 1 2 2 mvi (7.16) If a frictional force acts, then the work kinetic energy theorem can be modified to give Ki Wother fk d Kf (7.17b) The instantaneous power is defined as the time rate of energy transfer. If an agent applies a force F to an object moving with a velocity v, the power delivered by that agent is dW dt F v (7.18) QUESTIONS 1. Consider a tug-of-war in which two teams pulling on a rope are evenly matched so that no motion takes place. Assume that the rope does not stretch. Is work done on the rope? On the pullers? On the ground? Is work done on anything? 2. For what values of is the scalar product (a) positive and (b) negative? 3. As the load on a spring hung vertically is increased, one would not expect the Fs-versus-x curve to always remain linear, as shown in Figure 7.10d. Explain qualitatively what you would expect for this curve as m is increased. 4. Can the kinetic energy of an object be negative? Explain. 5. (a) If the speed of a particle is doubled, what happens to its kinetic energy? (b) If the net work done on a particle is zero, what can be said about the speed? 6. In Example 7.16, does the required power increase or decrease as the force of friction is reduced? 7. An automobile sales representative claims that a "soupedup" 300-hp engine is a necessary option in a compact car (instead of a conventional 130-hp engine). Suppose you intend to drive the car within speed limits ( 55 mi/h) and on flat terrain. How would you counter this sales pitch? 8. One bullet has twice the mass of another bullet. If both bullets are fired so that they have the same speed, which has the greater kinetic energy? What is the ratio of the kinetic energies of the two bullets? 9. When a punter kicks a football, is he doing any work on the ball while his toe is in contact with it? Is he doing any work on the ball after it loses contact with his toe? Are any forces doing work on the ball while it is in flight? Discuss the work done by a pitcher throwing a baseball. What is the approximate distance through which the force acts as the ball is thrown? Two sharpshooters fire 0.30-caliber rifles using identical shells. The barrel of rifle A is 2.00 cm longer than that of rifle B. Which rifle will have the higher muzzle speed? (Hint: The force of the expanding gases in the barrel accelerates the bullets.) As a simple pendulum swings back and forth, the forces acting on the suspended mass are the force of gravity, the tension in the supporting cord, and air resistance. (a) Which of these forces, if any, does no work on the pendulum? (b) Which of these forces does negative work at all times during its motion? (c) Describe the work done by the force of gravity while the pendulum is swinging. The kinetic energy of an object depends on the frame of reference in which its motion is measured. Give an example to illustrate this point. An older model car accelerates from 0 to a speed v in 10 s. A newer, more powerful sports car accelerates from 0 to 2v in the same time period. What is the ratio of powers expended by the two cars? Consider the energy coming from the engines to appear only as kinetic energy of the cars. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. Problems 207 PROBLEMS 1, 2, 3 = straightforward, intermediate, challenging = full solution available in the Student Solutions Manual and Study Guide WEB = solution posted at http://www.saunderscollege.com/physics/ = Computer useful in solving problem = Interactive Physics = paired numerical/symbolic problems Section 7.1 Work Done by a Constant Force 1. A tugboat exerts a constant force of 5 000 N on a ship moving at constant speed through a harbor. How much work does the tugboat do on the ship in a distance of 3.00 km? 2. A shopper in a supermarket pushes a cart with a force of 35.0 N directed at an angle of 25.0 downward from the horizontal. Find the work done by the shopper as she moves down an aisle 50.0 m in length. 3. A raindrop (m 3.35 10 5 kg) falls vertically at constant speed under the influence of gravity and air resistance. After the drop has fallen 100 m, what is the work done (a) by gravity and (b) by air resistance? 4. A sledge loaded with bricks has a total mass of 18.0 kg and is pulled at constant speed by a rope. The rope is inclined at 20.0 above the horizontal, and the sledge moves a distance of 20.0 m on a horizontal surface. The coefficient of kinetic friction between the sledge and the surface is 0.500. (a) What is the tension of the rope? (b) How much work is done on the sledge by the rope? (c) What is the energy lost due to friction? 5. A block of mass 2.50 kg is pushed 2.20 m along a frictionless horizontal table by a constant 16.0-N force directed 25.0 below the horizontal. Determine the work done by (a) the applied force, (b) the normal force exerted by the table, and (c) the force of gravity. (d) Determine the total work done on the block. 6. A 15.0-kg block is dragged over a rough, horizontal surface by a 70.0-N force acting at 20.0 above the horizontal. The block is displaced 5.00 m, and the coefficient of kinetic friction is 0.300. Find the work done by (a) the 70-N force, (b) the normal force, and (c) the force of gravity. (d) What is the energy loss due to friction? (e) Find the total change in the block's kinetic energy. 7. Batman, whose mass is 80.0 kg, is holding onto the free end of a 12.0-m rope, the other end of which is fixed to a tree limb above. He is able to get the rope in motion as only Batman knows how, eventually getting it to swing enough so that he can reach a ledge when the rope makes a 60.0 angle with the vertical. How much work was done against the force of gravity in this maneuver? WEB 9. Vector A extends from the origin to a point having polar coordinates (7, 70), and vector B extends from the origin to a point having polar coordinates (4, 130). Find A B. 10. Given two arbitrary vectors A and B, show that A B Ax Bx Ay By Az Bz . (Hint: Write A and B in unit vector form and use Equations 7.4 and 7.5.) 11. A force F (6i 2j) N acts on a particle that undergoes a displacement d (3i j)m. Find (a) the work done by the force on the particle and (b) the angle between F and d. 12. For A 3i j k, B i 2j 5k, and C 2j 3k, find C (A B). 13. Using the definition of the scalar product, find the angles between (a) A 3i 2j and B 4i 4j; (b) A 2i 4j and B 3i 4j 2k; (c) A i 2j 2k and B 3j 4k. 14. Find the scalar product of the vectors in Figure P7.14. y 118 x 32.8 N 132 17.3 cm/s Figure P7.14 Section 7.3 Work Done by a Varying Force WEB Section 7.2 The Scalar Product of Two Vectors In Problems 8 to 14, calculate all numerical answers to three significant figures. 8. Vector A has a magnitude of 5.00 units, and vector B has a magnitude of 9.00 units. The two vectors make an angle of 50.0 with each other. Find A B. WEB 15. The force acting on a particle varies as shown in Figure P7.15. Find the work done by the force as the particle moves (a) from x 0 to x 8.00 m, (b) from x 8.00 m to x 10.0 m, and (c) from x 0 to x 10.0 m. 16. The force acting on a particle is Fx (8x 16) N, where x is in meters. (a) Make a plot of this force versus x from x 0 to x 3.00 m. (b) From your graph, find the net work done by this force as the particle moves from x 0 to x 3.00 m. 17. A particle is subject to a force Fx that varies with position as in Figure P7.17. Find the work done by the force on the body as it moves (a) from x 0 to x 5.00 m, 208 CHAPTER 7 Work and Kinetic Energy Fx(N) 6 4 2 2 2 4 4 6 8 10 x(m) k1 k2 Figure P7.15 2000 Fx(N) 3 2 1 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 x(m) Total 1500 force (N) 1000 500 0 10 20 30 40 Distance (cm) 50 60 Figure P7.21 Figure P7.17 Problems 17 and 32. 18. 19. 20. 21. (b) from x 5.00 m to x 10.0 m, and (c) from x 10.0 m to x 15.0 m. (d) What is the total work done by the force over the distance x 0 to x 15.0 m? A force F (4xi 3y j) N acts on an object as it moves in the x direction from the origin to x 5.00 m. Find the work W F dr done on the object by the force. When a 4.00-kg mass is hung vertically on a certain light spring that obeys Hooke's law, the spring stretches 2.50 cm. If the 4.00-kg mass is removed, (a) how far will the spring stretch if a 1.50-kg mass is hung on it and (b) how much work must an external agent do to stretch the same spring 4.00 cm from its unstretched position? An archer pulls her bow string back 0.400 m by exerting a force that increases uniformly from zero to 230 N. (a) What is the equivalent spring constant of the bow? (b) How much work is done by the archer in pulling the bow? A 6 000-kg freight car rolls along rails with negligible friction. The car is brought to rest by a combination of two coiled springs, as illustrated in Figure P7.21. Both springs obey Hooke's law with k1 1 600 N/m and k 2 3 400 N/m. After the first spring compresses a distance of 30.0 cm, the second spring (acting with the first) increases the force so that additional compression occurs, as shown in the graph. If the car is brought to rest 50.0 cm after first contacting the two-spring system, find the car's initial speed. 22. A 100-g bullet is fired from a rifle having a barrel 0.600 m long. Assuming the origin is placed where the bullet begins to move, the force (in newtons) exerted on the bullet by the expanding gas is 15 000 10 000x 25 000x 2, where x is in meters. (a) Determine the work done by the gas on the bullet as the bullet travels the length of the barrel. (b) If the barrel is 1.00 m long, how much work is done and how does this value compare with the work calculated in part (a)? 23. If it takes 4.00 J of work to stretch a Hooke's-law spring 10.0 cm from its unstressed length, determine the extra work required to stretch it an additional 10.0 cm. 24. If it takes work W to stretch a Hooke's-law spring a distance d from its unstressed length, determine the extra work required to stretch it an additional distance d . 25. A small mass m is pulled to the top of a frictionless halfcylinder (of radius R) by a cord that passes over the top of the cylinder, as illustrated in Figure P7.25. (a) If the mass moves at a constant speed, show that F mg cos . (Hint: If the mass moves at a constant speed, the component of its acceleration tangent to the cylinder must be zero at all times.) (b) By directly integrating W F ds, find the work done in moving the mass at constant speed from the bottom to the top of the half- Problems F m R 209 Figure P7.25 cylinder. Here ds represents an incremental displacement of the small mass. 26. Express the unit of the force constant of a spring in terms of the basic units meter, kilogram, and second. Section 7.4 Theorem Kinetic Energy and the Work Kinetic Energy 27. A 0.600-kg particle has a speed of 2.00 m/s at point A and kinetic energy of 7.50 J at point B. What is (a) its kinetic energy at A? (b) its speed at B? (c) the total work done on the particle as it moves from A to B? 28. A 0.300-kg ball has a speed of 15.0 m/s. (a) What is its kinetic energy? (b) If its speed were doubled, what would be its kinetic energy? 29. A 3.00-kg mass has an initial velocity vi (6.00i 2.00j) m/s. (a) What is its kinetic energy at this time? (b) Find the total work done on the object if its velocity changes to (8.00i 4.00j) m/s. (Hint: Remember that v 2 v v.) 30. A mechanic pushes a 2 500-kg car, moving it from rest and making it accelerate from rest to a speed v. He does 5 000 J of work in the process. During this time, the car moves 25.0 m. If friction between the car and the road is negligible, (a) what is the final speed v of the car? (b) What constant horizontal force did he exert on the car? 31. A mechanic pushes a car of mass m, doing work W in making it accelerate from rest. If friction between the car and the road is negligible, (a) what is the final speed of the car? During the time the mechanic pushes the car, the car moves a distance d. (b) What constant horizontal force did the mechanic exert on the car? 32. A 4.00-kg particle is subject to a total force that varies with position, as shown in Figure P7.17. The particle starts from rest at x 0. What is its speed at (a) x 5.00 m, (b) x 10.0 m, (c) x 15.0 m? 33. A 40.0-kg box initially at rest is pushed 5.00 m along a rough, horizontal floor with a constant applied horizontal force of 130 N. If the coefficient of friction between the box and the floor is 0.300, find (a) the work done by the applied force, (b) the energy loss due to friction, (c) the work done by the normal force, (d) the work done by gravity, (e) the change in kinetic energy of the box, and (f) the final speed of the box. WEB 34. You can think of the work kinetic energy theorem as a second theory of motion, parallel to Newton's laws in describing how outside influences affect the motion of an object. In this problem, work out parts (a) and (b) separately from parts (c) and (d) to compare the predictions of the two theories. In a rifle barrel, a 15.0-g bullet is accelerated from rest to a speed of 780 m/s. (a) Find the work that is done on the bullet. (b) If the rifle barrel is 72.0 cm long, find the magnitude of the average total force that acted on it, as F W/(d cos ). (c) Find the constant acceleration of a bullet that starts from rest and gains a speed of 780 m/s over a distance of 72.0 cm. (d) Find the total force that acted on it as F ma. 35. A crate of mass 10.0 kg is pulled up a rough incline with an initial speed of 1.50 m/s. The pulling force is 100 N parallel to the incline, which makes an angle of 20.0 with the horizontal. The coefficient of kinetic friction is 0.400, and the crate is pulled 5.00 m. (a) How much work is done by gravity? (b) How much energy is lost because of friction? (c) How much work is done by the 100-N force? (d) What is the change in kinetic energy of the crate? (e) What is the speed of the crate after it has been pulled 5.00 m? 36. A block of mass 12.0 kg slides from rest down a frictionless 35.0 incline and is stopped by a strong spring with k 3.00 104 N/m. The block slides 3.00 m from the point of release to the point where it comes to rest against the spring. When the block comes to rest, how far has the spring been compressed? 37. A sled of mass m is given a kick on a frozen pond. The kick imparts to it an initial speed vi 2.00 m/s. The coefficient of kinetic friction between the sled and the ice is k 0.100. Utilizing energy considerations, find the distance the sled moves before it stops. 38. A picture tube in a certain television set is 36.0 cm long. The electrical force accelerates an electron in the tube from rest to 1.00% of the speed of light over this distance. Determine (a) the kinetic energy of the electron as it strikes the screen at the end of the tube, (b) the magnitude of the average electrical force acting on the electron over this distance, (c) the magnitude of the average acceleration of the electron over this distance, and (d) the time of flight. 39. A bullet with a mass of 5.00 g and a speed of 600 m/s penetrates a tree to a depth of 4.00 cm. (a) Use work and energy considerations to find the average frictional force that stops the bullet. (b) Assuming that the frictional force is constant, determine how much time elapsed between the moment the bullet entered the tree and the moment it stopped. 40. An Atwood's machine (see Fig. 5.15) supports masses of 0.200 kg and 0.300 kg. The masses are held at rest beside each other and then released. Neglecting friction, what is the speed of each mass the instant it has moved 0.400 m? 210 CHAPTER 7 Work and Kinetic Energy burning 1 gal of gasoline supplies 1.34 108 J of energy, find the amount of gasoline used by the car in accelerating from rest to 55.0 mi/h. Here you may ignore the effects of air resistance and rolling resistance. (b) How many such accelerations will 1 gal provide? (c) The mileage claimed for the car is 38.0 mi/gal at 55 mi/h. What power is delivered to the wheels (to overcome frictional effects) when the car is driven at this speed? 50. Suppose the empty car described in Table 7.2 has a fuel economy of 6.40 km/L (15 mi/gal) when traveling at 26.8 m/s (60 mi/h). Assuming constant efficiency, determine the fuel economy of the car if the total mass of the passengers and the driver is 350 kg. 51. When an air conditioner is added to the car described in Problem 50, the additional output power required to operate the air conditioner is 1.54 kW. If the fuel economy of the car is 6.40 km/L without the air conditioner, what is it when the air conditioner is operating? (Optional) 41. A 2.00-kg block is attached to a spring of force constant 500 N/m, as shown in Figure 7.10. The block is pulled 5.00 cm to the right of equilibrium and is then released from rest. Find the speed of the block as it passes through equilibrium if (a) the horizontal surface is frictionless and (b) the coefficient of friction between the block and the surface is 0.350. Section 7.5 Power WEB 42. Make an order-of-magnitude estimate of the power a car engine contributes to speeding up the car to highway speed. For concreteness, consider your own car (if you use one). In your solution, state the physical quantities you take as data and the values you measure or estimate for them. The mass of the vehicle is given in the owner's manual. If you do not wish to consider a car, think about a bus or truck for which you specify the necessary physical quantities. 43. A 700-N Marine in basic training climbs a 10.0-m vertical rope at a constant speed in 8.00 s. What is his power output? 44. If a certain horse can maintain 1.00 hp of output for 2.00 h, how many 70.0-kg bundles of shingles can the horse hoist (using some pulley arrangement) to the roof of a house 8.00 m tall, assuming 70.0% efficiency? 45. A certain automobile engine delivers 2.24 104 W (30.0 hp) to its wheels when moving at a constant speed of 27.0 m/s ( 60 mi/h). What is the resistive force acting on the automobile at that speed? 46. A skier of mass 70.0 kg is pulled up a slope by a motordriven cable. (a) How much work is required for him to be pulled a distance of 60.0 m up a 30.0 slope (assumed frictionless) at a constant speed of 2.00 m/s? (b) A motor of what power is required to perform this task? 47. A 650-kg elevator starts from rest. It moves upward for 3.00 s with constant acceleration until it reaches its cruising speed of 1.75 m/s. (a) What is the average power of the elevator motor during this period? (b) How does this power compare with its power when it moves at its cruising speed? 48. An energy-efficient lightbulb, taking in 28.0 W of power, can produce the same level of brightness as a conventional bulb operating at 100-W power. The lifetime of the energy-efficient bulb is 10 000 h and its purchase price is $17.0, whereas the conventional bulb has a lifetime of 750 h and costs $0.420 per bulb. Determine the total savings obtained through the use of one energyefficient bulb over its lifetime as opposed to the use of conventional bulbs over the same time period. Assume an energy cost of $0.080 0 per kilowatt hour. Section 7.7 Kinetic Energy at High Speeds 52. An electron moves with a speed of 0.995c. (a) What is its kinetic energy? (b) If you use the classical expression to calculate its kinetic energy, what percentage error results? 53. A proton in a high-energy accelerator moves with a speed of c/2. Using the work kinetic energy theorem, find the work required to increase its speed to (a) 0.750c and (b) 0.995c. 54. Find the kinetic energy of a 78.0-kg spacecraft launched out of the Solar System with a speed of 106 km/s using (a) the classical equation K 1 mv 2 and (b) the rela2 tivistic equation. ADDITIONAL PROBLEMS 55. A baseball outfielder throws a 0.150-kg baseball at a speed of 40.0 m/s and an initial angle of 30.0. What is the kinetic energy of the baseball at the highest point of the trajectory? 56. While running, a person dissipates about 0.600 J of mechanical energy per step per kilogram of body mass. If a 60.0-kg runner dissipates a power of 70.0 W during a race, how fast is the person running? Assume a running step is 1.50 m in length. 57. A particle of mass m moves with a constant acceleration a. If the initial position vector and velocity of the particle are ri and vi , respectively, use energy arguments to show that its speed vf at any time satisfies the equation vf 2 vi 2 2a (rf ri ) (Optional) Section 7.6 Energy and the Automobile 49. A compact car of mass 900 kg has an overall motor efficiency of 15.0%. (That is, 15.0% of the energy supplied by the fuel is delivered to the wheels of the car.) (a) If where rf is the position vector of the particle at that same time. 58. The direction of an arbitrary vector A can be completely specified with the angles , , and that the vec- Problems tor makes with the x, y, and z axes, respectively. If A Ax i A y j A z k, (a) find expressions for cos , cos , and cos (known as direction cosines) and (b) show that these angles satisfy the relation cos2 cos2 cos2 1. (Hint: Take the scalar product of A with i, j, and k separately.) 59. A 4.00-kg particle moves along the x axis. Its position varies with time according to x t 2.0t 3, where x is in meters and t is in seconds. Find (a) the kinetic energy at any time t, (b) the acceleration of the particle and the force acting on it at time t, (c) the power being delivered to the particle at time t, and (d) the work done on the particle in the interval t 0 to t 2.00 s. 60. A traveler at an airport takes an escalator up one floor (Fig. P7.60). The moving staircase would itself carry him upward with vertical velocity component v between entry and exit points separated by height h. However, while the escalator is moving, the hurried traveler climbs the steps of the escalator at a rate of n steps/s. Assume that the height of each step is hs . (a) Determine the amount of work done by the traveler during his escalator ride, given that his mass is m. (b) Determine the work the escalator motor does on this person. 211 62. 63. 64. 65. 66. calculate the work done by this force when the spring is stretched 0.100 m. In a control system, an accelerometer consists of a 4.70-g mass sliding on a low-friction horizontal rail. A low-mass spring attaches the mass to a flange at one end of the rail. When subject to a steady acceleration of 0.800g, the mass is to assume a location 0.500 cm away from its equilibrium position. Find the stiffness constant required for the spring. A 2 100-kg pile driver is used to drive a steel I-beam into the ground. The pile driver falls 5.00 m before coming into contact with the beam, and it drives the beam 12.0 cm into the ground before coming to rest. Using energy considerations, calculate the average force the beam exerts on the pile driver while the pile driver is brought to rest. A cyclist and her bicycle have a combined mass of 75.0 kg. She coasts down a road inclined at 2.00 with the horizontal at 4.00 m/s and down a road inclined at 4.00 at 8.00 m/s. She then holds on to a moving vehicle and coasts on a level road. What power must the vehicle expend to maintain her speed at 3.00 m/s? Assume that the force of air resistance is proportional to her speed and that other frictional forces remain constant. (Warning: You must not attempt this dangerous maneuver.) A single constant force F acts on a particle of mass m. The particle starts at rest at t 0. (a) Show that the instantaneous power delivered by the force at any time t is (F 2/m)t. (b) If F 20.0 N and m 5.00 kg, what is the power delivered at t 3.00 s? A particle is attached between two identical springs on a horizontal frictionless table. Both springs have spring constant k and are initially unstressed. (a) If the particle is pulled a distance x along a direction perpendicular to the initial configuration of the springs, as in Figure P7.66, show that the force exerted on the particle by the springs is F 2kx 1 L x 2 L2 i (b) Determine the amount of work done by this force in moving the particle from x A to x 0. k L x A Figure P7.60 (Ron Chapple/FPG) L k Top view 61. When a certain spring is stretched beyond its proportional limit, the restoring force satisfies the equation F kx x 3. If k 10.0 N/m and 100 N/m3, Figure P7.66 212 CHAPTER 7 Work and Kinetic Energy 67. Review Problem. Two constant forces act on a 5.00-kg object moving in the xy plane, as shown in Figure P7.67. Force F1 is 25.0 N at 35.0, while F2 42.0 N at 150. At time t 0, the object is at the origin and has velocity (4.0i 2.5j) m/s. (a) Express the two forces in unit vector notation. Use unit vector notation for your other answers. (b) Find the total force on the object. (c) Find the object's acceleration. Now, considering the instant t 3.00 s, (d) find the object's velocity, (e) its location, (f) its kinetic energy from 1 mv f 2 , and 2 WEB (g) its kinetic energy from 1 mv i 2 F d. 2 y F2 150 35.0 x 10.0 Figure P7.71 F1 71. The ball launcher in a pinball machine has a spring that has a force constant of 1.20 N/cm (Fig. P7.71). The surface on which the ball moves is inclined 10.0 with respect to the horizontal. If the spring is initially compressed 5.00 cm, find the launching speed of a 100-g ball when the plunger is released. Friction and the mass of the plunger are negligible. 72. In diatomic molecules, the constituent atoms exert attractive forces on each other at great distances and repulsive forces at short distances. For many molecules, the Lennard Jones law is a good approximation to the magnitude of these forces: 13 7 Figure P7.67 68. When different weights are hung on a spring, the spring stretches to different lengths as shown in the following table. (a) Make a graph of the applied force versus the extension of the spring. By least-squares fitting, determine the straight line that best fits the data. (You may not want to use all the data points.) (b) From the slope of the best-fit line, find the spring constant k. (c) If the spring is extended to 105 mm, what force does it exert on the suspended weight? F (N) L (mm) 2.0 15 4.0 32 6.0 49 8.0 64 10 79 12 14 98 112 16 126 18 149 F F0 2 r r 69. A 200-g block is pressed against a spring of force constant 1.40 kN/m until the block compresses the spring 10.0 cm. The spring rests at the bottom of a ramp inclined at 60.0 to the horizontal. Using energy considerations, determine how far up the incline the block moves before it stops (a) if there is no friction between the block and the ramp and (b) if the coefficient of kinetic friction is 0.400. 70. A 0.400-kg particle slides around a horizontal track. The track has a smooth, vertical outer wall forming a circle with a radius of 1.50 m. The particle is given an initial speed of 8.00 m/s. After one revolution, its speed has dropped to 6.00 m/s because of friction with the rough floor of the track. (a) Find the energy loss due to friction in one revolution. (b) Calculate the coefficient of kinetic friction. (c) What is the total number of revolutions the particle makes before stopping? where r is the center-to-center distance between the atoms in the molecule, is a length parameter, and F0 is the force when r . For an oxygen molecule, F0 9.60 10 11 N and 3.50 10 10 m. Determine the work done by this force if the atoms are pulled apart from r 4.00 10 10 m to r 9.00 10 10 m. 73. A horizontal string is attached to a 0.250-kg mass lying on a rough, horizontal table. The string passes over a light, frictionless pulley, and a 0.400-kg mass is then attached to its free end. The coefficient of sliding friction between the 0.250-kg mass and the table is 0.200. Using the work kinetic energy theorem, determine (a) the speed of the masses after each has moved 20.0 m from rest and (b) the mass that must be added to the 0.250-kg mass so that, given an initial velocity, the masses continue to move at a constant speed. (c) What mass must be removed from the 0.400-kg mass so that the same outcome as in part (b) is achieved? 74. Suppose a car is modeled as a cylinder moving with a speed v, as in Figure P7.74. In a time t, a column of air v t v A Figure P7.74 Answers to Quick Quizzes of mass m must be moved a distance v t and, hence, 1 must be given a kinetic energy 2 ( m)v 2. Using this model, show that the power loss due to air resistance is 1 1 3 2 2 Av and that the resistive force is 2 Av , where is the density of air. 75. A particle moves along the x axis from x 12.8 m to x 23.7 m under the influence of a force F x3 375 3.75 x 213 Let be the power of an agent causing motion; w, the thing moved; d, the distance covered; and t, the time taken. Then (1) a power equal to will in a period of time equal to t move w/2 a distance 2d; or (2) it will move w/2 the given distance d in time t/2. Also, if (3) the given power moves the given object w a distance d/2 in time t/2, then (4) /2 will move w/2 the given distance d in the given time t. (a) Show that Aristotle's proportions are included in the equation t bwd, where b is a proportionality constant. (b) Show that our theory of motion includes this part of Aristotle's theory as one special case. In particular, describe a situation in which it is true, derive the equation representing Aristotle's proportions, and determine the proportionality constant. where F is in newtons and x is in meters. Using numerical integration, determine the total work done by this force during this displacement. Your result should be accurate to within 2%. 76. More than 2 300 years ago the Greek teacher Aristotle wrote the first book called Physics. The following passage, rephrased with more precise terminology, is from the end of the book's Section Eta: ANSWERS TO QUICK QUIZZES 7.1 No. The force does no work on the object because the force is pointed toward the center of the circle and is therefore perpendicular to the motion. 7.2 (a) Assuming the person lifts with a force of magnitude mg, the weight of the box, the work he does during the vertical displacement is mgh because the force is in the direction of the displacement. The work he does during the horizontal displacement is zero because now the force he exerts on the box is perpendicular to the displacement. The net work he does is mgh 0 mgh. (b) The work done by the gravitational force on the box as the box is displaced vertically is mgh because the direction of this force is opposite the direction of the displacement. The work done by the gravitational force is zero during the horizontal displacement because now the direction of this force is perpendicular to the direction of the displacement. The net work done by the gravitational force mgh 0 mgh. The total work done on the box is mgh mgh 0. 7.3 No. For example, consider the two vectors A 3i 2j and B 2i j. Their dot product is A B 8, yet both vectors have negative y components. 7.4 Force divided by displacement, which in SI units is newtons per meter (N/m). 7.5 Yes, whenever the frictional force has a component along the direction of motion. Consider a crate sitting on the bed of a truck as the truck accelerates to the east. The static friction force exerted on the crate by the truck acts to the east to give the crate the same acceleration as the truck (assuming that the crate does not slip). Because the crate accelerates, its kinetic energy must increase. 7.6 Because the two vehicles perform the same amount of work, the areas under the two graphs are equal. However, the graph for the low-power truck extends over a longer time interval and does not extend as high on the axis as the graph for the sports car does. High-power sports car Low-power truck t P U Z Z L E R A common scene at a carnival is the Ring-the-Bell attraction, in which the player swings a heavy hammer downward in an attempt to project a mass upward to ring a bell. What is the best strategy to win the game and impress your friends? (Robert E. Daemmrich/Tony Stone Images) c h a p t e r Potential Energy and Conservation of Energy Chapter Outline 8.1 8.2 8.3 8.4 8.5 8.6 214 Potential Energy Conservative and Nonconservative Forces Conservative Forces and Potential Energy Conservation of Mechanical Energy Work Done by Nonconservative Forces Relationship Between Conservative Forces and Potential Energy 8.7 8.8 8.9 (Optional) Energy Diagrams and the Equilibrium of a System Conservation of Energy in General (Optional) Mass Energy Equivalence Energy 8.10 (Optional) Quantization of 8.1 Potential Energy 215 I n Chapter 7 we introduced the concept of kinetic energy, which is the energy associated with the motion of an object. In this chapter we introduce another form of energy -- potential energy, which is the energy associated with the arrangement of a system of objects that exert forces on each other. Potential energy can be thought of as stored energy that can either do work or be converted to kinetic energy. The potential energy concept can be used only when dealing with a special class of forces called conservative forces. When only conservative forces act within an isolated system, the kinetic energy gained (or lost) by the system as its members change their relative positions is balanced by an equal loss (or gain) in potential energy. This balancing of the two forms of energy is known as the principle of conservation of mechanical energy. Energy is present in the Universe in various forms, including mechanical, electromagnetic, chemical, and nuclear. Furthermore, one form of energy can be converted to another. For example, when an electric motor is connected to a battery, the chemical energy in the battery is converted to electrical energy in the motor, which in turn is converted to mechanical energy as the motor turns some device. The transformation of energy from one form to another is an essential part of the study of physics, engineering, chemistry, biology, geology, and astronomy. When energy is changed from one form to another, the total amount present does not change. Conservation of energy means that although the form of energy may change, if an object (or system) loses energy, that same amount of energy appears in another object or in the object's surroundings. 8.1 5.3 POTENTIAL ENERGY An object that possesses kinetic energy can do work on another object -- for example, a moving hammer driving a nail into a wall. Now we shall introduce another form of energy. This energy, called potential energy U, is the energy associated with a system of objects. Before we describe specific forms of potential energy, we must first define a system, which consists of two or more objects that exert forces on one another. If the arrangement of the system changes, then the potential energy of the system changes. If the system consists of only two particle-like objects that exert forces on each other, then the work done by the force acting on one of the objects causes a transformation of energy between the object's kinetic energy and other forms of the system's energy. Gravitational Potential Energy As an object falls toward the Earth, the Earth exerts a gravitational force mg on the object, with the direction of the force being the same as the direction of the object's motion. The gravitational force does work on the object and thereby increases the object's kinetic energy. Imagine that a brick is dropped from rest directly above a nail in a board lying on the ground. When the brick is released, it falls toward the ground, gaining speed and therefore gaining kinetic energy. The brick Earth system has potential energy when the brick is at any distance above the ground (that is, it has the potential to do work), and this potential energy is converted to kinetic energy as the brick falls. The conversion from potential energy to kinetic energy occurs continuously over the entire fall. When the brick reaches the nail and the board lying on the ground, it does work on the nail, 216 CHAPTER 8 Potential Energy and Conservation of Energy driving it into the board. What determines how much work the brick is able to do on the nail? It is easy to see that the heavier the brick, the farther in it drives the nail; also the higher the brick is before it is released, the more work it does when it strikes the nail. The product of the magnitude of the gravitational force mg acting on an object and the height y of the object is so important in physics that we give it a name: the gravitational potential energy. The symbol for gravitational potential energy is Ug , and so the defining equation for gravitational potential energy is Gravitational potential energy Ug mgy (8.1) mg d yi mg yf Gravitational potential energy is the potential energy of the object Earth system. This potential energy is transformed into kinetic energy of the system by the gravitational force. In this type of system, in which one of the members (the Earth) is much more massive than the other (the object), the massive object can be modeled as stationary, and the kinetic energy of the system can be represented entirely by the kinetic energy of the lighter object. Thus, the kinetic energy of the system is represented by that of the object falling toward the Earth. Also note that Equation 8.1 is valid only for objects near the surface of the Earth, where g is approximately constant.1 Let us now directly relate the work done on an object by the gravitational force to the gravitational potential energy of the object Earth system. To do this, let us consider a brick of mass m at an initial height yi above the ground, as shown in Figure 8.1. If we neglect air resistance, then the only force that does work on the brick as it falls is the gravitational force exerted on the brick mg. The work Wg done by the gravitational force as the brick undergoes a downward displacement d is Wg (mg) d ( mg j) (yf yi) j mgyi mgyf Figure 8.1 The work done on the brick by the gravitational force as the brick falls from a height yi to a height yf is equal to mgy i mgy f . where we have used the fact that j j 1 (Eq. 7.4). If an object undergoes both a horizontal and a vertical displacement, so that d (xf xi)i (yf yi)j, then the work done by the gravitational force is still mgyi mgyf because mg j (xf xi)i 0. Thus, the work done by the gravitational force depends only on the change in y and not on any change in the horizontal position x. We just learned that the quantity mgy is the gravitational potential energy of the system Ug , and so we have Wg Ui Uf (Uf Ui) Ug (8.2) From this result, we see that the work done on any object by the gravitational force is equal to the negative of the change in the system's gravitational potential energy. Also, this result demonstrates that it is only the difference in the gravitational potential energy at the initial and final locations that matters. This means that we are free to place the origin of coordinates in any convenient location. Finally, the work done by the gravitational force on an object as the object falls to the Earth is the same as the work done were the object to start at the same point and slide down an incline to the Earth. Horizontal motion does not affect the value of Wg . The unit of gravitational potential energy is the same as that of work -- the joule. Potential energy, like work and kinetic energy, is a scalar quantity. 1 The assumption that the force of gravity is constant is a good one as long as the vertical displacement is small compared with the Earth's radius. 8.1 Potential Energy 217 Quick Quiz 8.1 Can the gravitational potential energy of a system ever be negative? EXAMPLE 8.1 The Bowler and the Sore Toe the ball reaches his toe gives Uf mg yf (7 kg) (9.80 m/s2)(0.03 m) 2.06 J. So, the work done by the gravitational force is Wg Ui Uf 32.24 J. We should probably keep only one digit because of the roughness of our estimates; thus, we estimate that the gravitational force does 30 J of work on the bowling ball as it falls. The system had 30 J of gravitational potential energy relative to the top of the toe before the ball began its fall. When we use the bowler's head (which we estimate to be 1.50 m above the floor) as our origin of coordinates, we find that Ui mg yi (7 kg)(9.80 m/s2)( 1 m) 68.6 J and that Uf mg yf (7 kg)(9.80 m/s2)( 1.47 m) 100.8 J. The work being done by the gravitational force is still Wg Ui Uf 32.24 J 30 J. A bowling ball held by a careless bowler slips from the bowler's hands and drops on the bowler's toe. Choosing floor level as the y 0 point of your coordinate system, estimate the total work done on the ball by the force of gravity as the ball falls. Repeat the calculation, using the top of the bowler's head as the origin of coordinates. Solution First, we need to estimate a few values. A bowling ball has a mass of approximately 7 kg, and the top of a person's toe is about 0.03 m above the floor. Also, we shall assume the ball falls from a height of 0.5 m. Holding nonsignificant digits until we finish the problem, we calculate the gravitational potential energy of the ball Earth system just before the ball is released to be Ui mg yi (7 kg) (9.80 m/s2)(0.5 m) 34.3 J. A similar calculation for when Elastic Potential Energy Now consider a system consisting of a block plus a spring, as shown in Figure 8.2. kx. In the previous The force that the spring exerts on the block is given by Fs chapter, we learned that the work done by the spring force on a block connected to the spring is given by Equation 7.11: Ws 1 2 2 kxi 1 2 2 kxf (8.3) In this situation, the initial and final x coordinates of the block are measured from its equilibrium position, x 0. Again we see that Ws depends only on the initial and final x coordinates of the object and is zero for any closed path. The elastic potential energy function associated with the system is defined by Us 1 2 2 kx (8.4) Elastic potential energy stored in a spring The elastic potential energy of the system can be thought of as the energy stored in the deformed spring (one that is either compressed or stretched from its equilibrium position). To visualize this, consider Figure 8.2, which shows a spring on a frictionless, horizontal surface. When a block is pushed against the spring (Fig. 8.2b) and the spring is compressed a distance x, the elastic potential energy stored in the spring is kx 2/2. When the block is released from rest, the spring snaps back to its original length and the stored elastic potential energy is transformed into kinetic energy of the block (Fig. 8.2c). The elastic potential energy stored in the spring is zero whenever the spring is undeformed (x 0). Energy is stored in the spring only when the spring is either stretched or compressed. Furthermore, the elastic potential energy is a maximum when the spring has reached its maximum compression or extension (that is, when x is a maximum). Finally, because the elastic potential energy is proportional to x 2, we see that Us is always positive in a deformed spring. 218 CHAPTER 8 Potential Energy and Conservation of Energy x=0 m (a) x m Us = 1 2 2 kx Ki = 0 (b) x=0 v m Us = 0 Kf = (c) 2 1 2 mv Figure 8.2 (a) An undeformed spring on a frictionless horizontal surface. (b) A block of mass m is pushed against the spring, compressing it a distance x. (c) When the block is released from rest, the elastic potential energy stored in the spring is transferred to the block in the form of kinetic energy. 8.2 CONSERVATIVE AND NONCONSERVATIVE FORCES The work done by the gravitational force does not depend on whether an object falls vertically or slides down a sloping incline. All that matters is the change in the object's elevation. On the other hand, the energy loss due to friction on that incline depends on the distance the object slides. In other words, the path makes no difference when we consider the work done by the gravitational force, but it does make a difference when we consider the energy loss due to frictional forces. We can use this varying dependence on path to classify forces as either conservative or nonconservative. Of the two forces just mentioned, the gravitational force is conservative and the frictional force is nonconservative. Conservative Forces Properties of a conservative force Conservative forces have two important properties: 1. A force is conservative if the work it does on a particle moving between any two points is independent of the path taken by the particle. 2. The work done by a conservative force on a particle moving through any closed path is zero. (A closed path is one in which the beginning and end points are identical.) The gravitational force is one example of a conservative force, and the force that a spring exerts on any object attached to the spring is another. As we learned in the preceding section, the work done by the gravitational force on an object moving between any two points near the Earth's surface is Wg mg yi mg yf . From this equation we see that Wg depends only on the initial and final y coordi- 8.3 Conservative Forces and Potential Energy 219 nates of the object and hence is independent of the path. Furthermore, Wg is zero when the object moves over any closed path (where yi yf ). For the case of the object spring system, the work Ws done by the spring force is given by Ws 1kxi2 1kxf 2 (Eq. 8.3). Again, we see that the spring force is con2 2 servative because Ws depends only on the initial and final x coordinates of the object and is zero for any closed path. We can associate a potential energy with any conservative force and can do this only for conservative forces. In the previous section, the potential energy associated with the gravitational force was defined as Ug mgy. In general, the work Wc done on an object by a conservative force is equal to the initial value of the potential energy associated with the object minus the final value: Wc Ui Uf U (8.5) Work done by a conservative force This equation should look familiar to you. It is the general form of the equation for work done by the gravitational force (Eq. 8.2) and that for the work done by the spring force (Eq. 8.3). Nonconservative Forces 5.3 A force is nonconservative if it causes a change in mechanical energy E, which we define as the sum of kinetic and potential energies. For example, if a book is sent sliding on a horizontal surface that is not frictionless, the force of kinetic friction reduces the book's kinetic energy. As the book slows down, its kinetic energy decreases. As a result of the frictional force, the temperatures of the book and surface increase. The type of energy associated with temperature is internal energy, which we will study in detail in Chapter 20. Experience tells us that this internal energy cannot be transferred back to the kinetic energy of the book. In other words, the energy transformation is not reversible. Because the force of kinetic friction changes the mechanical energy of a system, it is a nonconservative force. From the work kinetic energy theorem, we see that the work done by a conservative force on an object causes a change in the kinetic energy of the object. The change in kinetic energy depends only on the initial and final positions of the object, and not on the path connecting these points. Let us compare this to the sliding book example, in which the nonconservative force of friction is acting between the book and the surface. According to Equation 7.17a, the change in kinetic energy of the book due to friction is K friction fkd , where d is the length of the path over which the friction force acts. Imagine that the book slides from A to B over the straight-line path of length d in Figure 8.3. The change in kinetic energy is fkd . Now, suppose the book slides over the semicircular path from A to B. In this case, the path is longer and, as a result, the change in kinetic energy is greater in magnitude than that in the straight-line case. For this particular path, the change in kinetic energy is fk d/2 , since d is the diameter of the semicircle. Thus, we see that for a nonconservative force, the change in kinetic energy depends on the path followed between the initial and final points. If a potential energy is involved, then the change in the total mechanical energy depends on the path followed. We shall return to this point in Section 8.5. Properties of a nonconservative force A d B Figure 8.3 The loss in mechanical energy due to the force of kinetic friction depends on the path taken as the book is moved from A to B. The loss in mechanical energy is greater along the red path than along the blue path. 8.3 CONSERVATIVE FORCES AND POTENTIAL ENERGY In the preceding section we found that the work done on a particle by a conservative force does not depend on the path taken by the particle. The work depends only on the particle's initial and final coordinates. As a consequence, we can de- 220 CHAPTER 8 Potential Energy and Conservation of Energy fine a potential energy function U such that the work done by a conservative force equals the decrease in the potential energy of the system. The work done by a conservative force F as a particle moves along the x axis is2 xf Wc xi Fx dx U (8.6) where Fx is the component of F in the direction of the displacement. That is, the work done by a conservative force equals the negative of the change in the potential energy associated with that force, where the change in the potential energy is defined as U Uf Ui . We can also express Equation 8.6 as xf U Uf Ui xi Fx dx (8.7) Therefore, U is negative when Fx and dx are in the same direction, as when an object is lowered in a gravitational field or when a spring pushes an object toward equilibrium. The term potential energy implies that the object has the potential, or capability, of either gaining kinetic energy or doing work when it is released from some point under the influence of a conservative force exerted on the object by some other member of the system. It is often convenient to establish some particular location xi as a reference point and measure all potential energy differences with respect to it. We can then define the potential energy function as xf Uf (x) xi Fx dx Ui (8.8) The value of Ui is often taken to be zero at the reference point. It really does not matter what value we assign to Ui , because any nonzero value merely shifts Uf (x) by a constant amount, and only the change in potential energy is physically meaningful. If the conservative force is known as a function of position, we can use Equation 8.8 to calculate the change in potential energy of a system as an object within the system moves from xi to xf . It is interesting to note that in the case of onedimensional displacement, a force is always conservative if it is a function of position only. This is not necessarily the case for motion involving two- or three-dimensional displacements. 8.4 5.9 CONSERVATION OF MECHANICAL ENERGY An object held at some height h above the floor has no kinetic energy. However, as we learned earlier, the gravitational potential energy of the object Earth system is equal to mgh. If the object is dropped, it falls to the floor; as it falls, its speed and thus its kinetic energy increase, while the potential energy of the system decreases. If factors such as air resistance are ignored, whatever potential energy the system loses as the object moves downward appears as kinetic energy of the object. In other words, the sum of the kinetic and potential energies -- the total mechanical energy E -- remains constant. This is an example of the principle of conservation 2 For a general displacement, the work done in two or three dimensions also equals Ui f Uf , where U U(x, y, z). We write this formally as W i F ds Ui Uf . 8.4 Conservation of Mechanical Energy 221 of mechanical energy. For the case of an object in free fall, this principle tells us that any increase (or decrease) in potential energy is accompanied by an equal decrease (or increase) in kinetic energy. Note that the total mechanical energy of a system remains constant in any isolated system of objects that interact only through conservative forces. Because the total mechanical energy E of a system is defined as the sum of the kinetic and potential energies, we can write E K U (8.9) Ef , and so we have (8.10) The mechanical energy of an isolated system remains constant Total mechanical energy We can state the principle of conservation of energy as Ei Ki Ui Kf Uf It is important to note that Equation 8.10 is valid only when no energy is added to or removed from the system. Furthermore, there must be no nonconservative forces doing work within the system. Consider the carnival Ring-the-Bell event illustrated at the beginning of the chapter. The participant is trying to convert the initial kinetic energy of the hammer into gravitational potential energy associated with a weight that slides on a vertical track. If the hammer has sufficient kinetic energy, the weight is lifted high enough to reach the bell at the top of the track. To maximize the hammer's kinetic energy, the player must swing the heavy hammer as rapidly as possible. The fast-moving hammer does work on the pivoted target, which in turn does work on the weight. Of course, greasing the track (so as to minimize energy loss due to friction) would also help but is probably not allowed! If more than one conservative force acts on an object within a system, a potential energy function is associated with each force. In such a case, we can apply the principle of conservation of mechanical energy for the system as Ki Ui Kf Uf (8.11) QuickLab Dangle a shoe from its lace and use it as a pendulum. Hold it to the side, release it, and note how high it swings at the end of its arc. How does this height compare with its initial height? You may want to check Question 8.3 as part of your investigation. where the number of terms in the sums equals the number of conservative forces present. For example, if an object connected to a spring oscillates vertically, two conservative forces act on the object: the spring force and the gravitational force. Twin Falls on the Island of Kauai, Hawaii. The gravitational potential energy of the water Earth system when the water is at the top of the falls is converted to kinetic energy once that water begins falling. How did the water get to the top of the cliff? In other words, what was the original source of the gravitational potential energy when the water was at the top? (Hint: This same source powers nearly everything on the planet.) 222 CHAPTER 8 Potential Energy and Conservation of Energy Quick Quiz 8.2 A ball is connected to a light spring suspended vertically, as shown in Figure 8.4. When displaced downward from its equilibrium position and released, the ball oscillates up and down. If air resistance is neglected, is the total mechanical energy of the system (ball plus spring plus Earth) conserved? How many forms of potential energy are there for this situation? Quick Quiz 8.3 m Figure 8.4 A ball connected to a massless spring suspended vertically. What forms of potential energy are associated with the ball spring Earth system when the ball is displaced downward? Three identical balls are thrown from the top of a building, all with the same initial speed. The first is thrown horizontally, the second at some angle above the horizontal, and the third at some angle below the horizontal, as shown in Figure 8.5. Neglecting air resistance, rank the speeds of the balls at the instant each hits the ground. 2 1 3 Figure 8.5 Three identical balls are thrown with the same initial speed from the top of a building. EXAMPLE 8.2 Ball in Free Fall A ball of mass m is dropped from a height h above the ground, as shown in Figure 8.6. (a) Neglecting air resistance, determine the speed of the ball when it is at a height y above the ground. Solution Because the ball is in free fall, the only force acting on it is the gravitational force. Therefore, we apply the principle of conservation of mechanical energy to the ball Earth system. Initially, the system has potential energy but no kinetic energy. As the ball falls, the total mechanical energy remains constant and equal to the initial potential energy of the system. At the instant the ball is released, its kinetic energy is Ki 0 and the potential energy of the system is Ui mgh. When the ball is at a distance y above the ground, its kinetic energy is Kf 1mvf 2 and the potential energy relative to the 2 ground is Uf mgy. Applying Equation 8.10, we obtain Ki 0 Ui mgh vf 2 Kf Uf mgy y) 1 2 2 mvf yi = h Ui = mgh Ki = 0 h vf y yf = y Uf = mg y K f = 1 mvf2 2 y=0 Ug = 0 2g(h Figure 8.6 A ball is dropped from a height h above the ground. Initially, the total energy of the ball Earth system is potential energy, equal to mgh relative to the ground. At the elevation y, the total energy is the sum of the kinetic and potential energies. 8.4 Conservation of Mechanical Energy vf 2 vf vi2 2g(h 2g(h y) y) 223 vf 2g(h y) The speed is always positive. If we had been asked to find the ball's velocity, we would use the negative value of the square root as the y component to indicate the downward motion. (b) Determine the speed of the ball at y if at the instant of release it already has an initial speed vi at the initial altitude h. vi2 Solution In this case, the initial energy includes kinetic energy equal to 1mvi2, and Equation 8.10 gives 2 1 2 2 mvi mgh 1 2 2 mvf mgy This result is consistent with the expression vy f 2 vy i 2 2g (yf yi ) from kinematics, where yi h. Furthermore, this result is valid even if the initial velocity is at an angle to the horizontal (the projectile situation) for two reasons: (1) energy is a scalar, and the kinetic energy depends only on the magnitude of the velocity; and (2) the change in the gravitational potential energy depends only on the change in position in the vertical direction. EXAMPLE 8.3 The Pendulum If we measure the y coordinates of the sphere from the center of rotation, then yA L cos A and yB L. Therefore, UA mgL cos A and UB mgL. Applying the principle of conservation of mechanical energy to the system gives KA 0 (1) vB UA A A pendulum consists of a sphere of mass m attached to a light cord of length L, as shown in Figure 8.7. The sphere is released from rest when the cord makes an angle A with the vertical, and the pivot at P is frictionless. (a) Find the speed of the sphere when it is at the lowest point . KB UB mgL Solution The only force that does work on the sphere is the gravitational force. (The force of tension is always perpendicular to each element of the displacement and hence does no work.) Because the gravitational force is conservative, the total mechanical energy of the pendulum Earth system is constant. (In other words, we can classify this as an "energy conservation" problem.) As the pendulum swings, continuous transformation between potential and kinetic energy occurs. At the instant the pendulum is released, the energy of the system is entirely potential energy. At point the pendulum has kinetic energy, but the system has lost some potential energy. At the system has regained its initial potential energy, and the kinetic energy of the pendulum is again zero. P mgL cos 1 2 2 mvB 2 gL(1 cos A) (b) What is the tension TB in the cord at ? Solution Because the force of tension does no work, we cannot determine the tension using the energy method. To find TB , we can apply Newton's second law to the radial direction. First, recall that the centripetal acceleration of a particle moving in a circle is equal to v 2/r directed toward the center of rotation. Because r L in this example, we obtain (2) Fr TB mg mar m vB2 L : Substituting (1) into (2) gives the tension at point L cos A A L (3) T TB mg 2 mg (1 2 cos cos A) A) mg (3 From (2) we see that the tension at is greater than the weight of the sphere. Furthermore, (3) gives the expected result that TB mg when the initial angle A 0. mg If the sphere is released from rest at the angle A it will never swing above this position during its motion. At the start of the motion, position , the energy is entirely potential. This initial potential energy is all transformed into kinetic energy at the lowest elevation . As the sphere continues to move along the arc, the energy again becomes entirely potential energy at . Figure 8.7 Exercise A pendulum of length 2.00 m and mass 0.500 kg is released from rest when the cord makes an angle of 30.0 with the vertical. Find the speed of the sphere and the tension in the cord when the sphere is at its lowest point. 2.29 m/s; 6.21 N. Answer 224 CHAPTER 8 Potential Energy and Conservation of Energy 8.5 WORK DONE BY NONCONSERVATIVE FORCES As we have seen, if the forces acting on objects within a system are conservative, then the mechanical energy of the system remains constant. However, if some of the forces acting on objects within the system are not conservative, then the mechanical energy of the system does not remain constant. Let us examine two types of nonconservative forces: an applied force and the force of kinetic friction. Work Done by an Applied Force When you lift a book through some distance by applying a force to it, the force you apply does work Wapp on the book, while the gravitational force does work Wg on the book. If we treat the book as a particle, then the net work done on the book is related to the change in its kinetic energy as described by the work kinetic energy theorem given by Equation 7.15: Wapp Wg K (8.12) Because the gravitational force is conservative, we can use Equation 8.2 to express the work done by the gravitational force in terms of the change in potential enU. Substituting this into Equation 8.12 gives ergy, or Wg Wapp K U (8.13) Note that the right side of this equation represents the change in the mechanical energy of the book Earth system. This result indicates that your applied force transfers energy to the system in the form of kinetic energy of the book and gravitational potential energy of the book Earth system. Thus, we conclude that if an object is part of a system, then an applied force can transfer energy into or out of the system. Situations Involving Kinetic Friction Kinetic friction is an example of a nonconservative force. If a book is given some initial velocity on a horizontal surface that is not frictionless, then the force of kinetic friction acting on the book opposes its motion and the book slows down and eventually stops. The force of kinetic friction reduces the kinetic energy of the book by transforming kinetic energy to internal energy of the book and part of the horizontal surface. Only part of the book's kinetic energy is transformed to internal energy in the book. The rest appears as internal energy in the surface. (When you trip and fall while running across a gymnasium floor, not only does the skin on your knees warm up but so does the floor!) As the book moves through a distance d, the only force that does work is the force of kinetic friction. This force causes a decrease in the kinetic energy of the book. This decrease was calculated in Chapter 7, leading to Equation 7.17a, which we repeat here: Kfriction fkd (8.14) If the book moves on an incline that is not frictionless, a change in the gravitational potential energy of the book Earth system also occurs, and fkd is the amount by which the mechanical energy of the system changes because of the force of kinetic friction. In such cases, E K U fkd (8.15) where Ei E Ef . QuickLab Find a friend and play a game of racquetball. After a long volley, feel the ball and note that it is warm. Why is that? 8.5 Work Done by Nonconservative Forces 225 Quick Quiz 8.4 Write down the work kinetic energy theorem for the general case of two objects that are connected by a spring and acted upon by gravity and some other external applied force. Include the effects of friction as Efriction . Problem-Solving Hints Conservation of Energy We can solve many problems in physics using the principle of conservation of energy. You should incorporate the following procedure when you apply this principle: Define your system, which may include two or more interacting particles, as well as springs or other systems in which elastic potential energy can be stored. Choose the initial and final points. Identify zero points for potential energy (both gravitational and spring). If there is more than one conservative force, write an expression for the potential energy associated with each force. Determine whether any nonconservative forces are present. Remember that if friction or air resistance is present, mechanical energy is not conserved. If mechanical energy is conserved, you can write the total initial energy E i K i U i at some point. Then, write an expression for the total final energy E f K f U f at the final point that is of interest. Because mechanical energy is conserved, you can equate the two total energies and solve for the quantity that is unknown. If frictional forces are present (and thus mechanical energy is not conserved), first write expressions for the total initial and total final energies. In this case, the difference between the total final mechanical energy and the total initial mechanical energy equals the change in mechanical energy in the system due to friction. EXAMPLE 8.4 Crate Sliding Down a Ramp A 3.00-kg crate slides down a ramp. The ramp is 1.00 m in length and inclined at an angle of 30.0, as shown in Figure 8.8. The crate starts from rest at the top, experiences a constant frictional force of magnitude 5.00 N, and continues to move a short distance on the flat floor after it leaves the ramp. Use energy methods to determine the speed of the crate at the bottom of the ramp. vi = 0 Solution Because vi 0, the initial kinetic energy at the top of the ramp is zero. If the y coordinate is measured from the bottom of the ramp (the final position where the potential energy is zero) with the upward direction being positive, then yi 0.500 m. Therefore, the total mechanical energy of the crate Earth system at the top is all potential energy: Ei Ki Ui 0 Ui mg yi 14.7 J (3.00 kg)(9.80 m/s2)(0.500 m) d = 1.00 m 0.500 m 30.0 vf Figure 8.8 A crate slides down a ramp under the influence of gravity. The potential energy decreases while the kinetic energy increases. 226 CHAPTER 8 Potential Energy and Conservation of Energy 1 2 2 mvf When the crate reaches the bottom of the ramp, the potential energy of the system is zero because the elevation of the crate is yf 0. Therefore, the total mechanical energy of the system when the crate reaches the bottom is all kinetic energy: Ef Kf Uf 1mvf 2 0 2 We cannot say that Ei Ef because a nonconservative force reduces the mechanical energy of the system: the force of kinetic friction acting on the crate. In this case, Equation 8.15 gives E fk d, where d is the displacement along the ramp. (Remember that the forces normal to the ramp do no work on the crate because they are perpendicular to the displacement.) With fk 5.00 N and d 1.00 m, we have E fkd (5.00 N)(1.00 m) 5.00 J Ef Ei mgyi 5.00 J fk d 9.70 J 1 2 2 mvf 14.7 J 19.4 J 3.00 kg vf 2 vf 6.47 m2/s2 2.54 m/s Exercise Use Newton's second law to find the acceleration of the crate along the ramp, and use the equations of kinematics to determine the final speed of the crate. Answer Exercise Answer 3.23 m/s2; 2.54 m/s. Assuming the ramp to be frictionless, find the final speed of the crate and its acceleration along the ramp. 3.13 m/s; 4.90 m/s2. This result indicates that the system loses some mechanical energy because of the presence of the nonconservative frictional force. Applying Equation 8.15 gives EXAMPLE 8.5 Motion on a Curved Track Ki 0 Ui mgh vf Kf 2gh Uf 0 1 2 2 mvf A child of mass m rides on an irregularly curved slide of height h 2.00 m, as shown in Figure 8.9. The child starts from rest at the top. (a) Determine his speed at the bottom, assuming no friction is present. Solution The normal force n does no work on the child because this force is always perpendicular to each element of the displacement. Because there is no friction, the mechanical energy of the child Earth system is conserved. If we measure the y coordinate in the upward direction from the bottom of the slide, then yi h, yf 0, and we obtain Note that the result is the same as it would be had the child fallen vertically through a distance h! In this example, h 2.00 m, giving vf 2gh 2(9.80 m/s2)(2.00 m) 6.26 m/s (b) If a force of kinetic friction acts on the child, how much mechanical energy does the system lose? Assume that vf 3.00 m/s and m 20.0 kg. n Solution In this case, mechanical energy is not conserved, and so we must use Equation 8.15 to find the loss of mechanical energy due to friction: E Ef Ei (Kf Uf ) (Ki Ui ) m) (1mvf 2 0) (0 mgh) 1mvf 2 mgh 2 2 1 2 (20.0 kg)(9.80 m/s2)(2.00 2 (20.0 kg)(3.00 m/s) 302 J Again, E is negative because friction is reducing mechanical energy of the system (the final mechanical energy is less than the initial mechanical energy). Because the slide is curved, the normal force changes in magnitude and direction during the motion. Therefore, the frictional force, which is proportional to n, also changes during the motion. Given this changing frictional force, do you think it is possible to determine k from these data? 2.00 m Fg = m g Figure 8.9 If the slide is frictionless, the speed of the child at the bottom depends only on the height of the slide. 8.5 Work Done by Nonconservative Forces 227 EXAMPLE 8.6 Let's Go Skiing! To find the distance the skier travels before coming to rest, we take KC 0. With vB 19.8 m/s and the frictional force given by fk kn kmg, we obtain E (KC UC) (KB UB) EC (0 vB2 2 kg 95.2 m Find the horizontal distance the skier travels before coming to rest if the incline also has a coefficient of kinetic friction equal to 0.210. EB 0) kmgd kmgd A skier starts from rest at the top of a frictionless incline of height 20.0 m, as shown in Figure 8.10. At the bottom of the incline, she encounters a horizontal surface where the coefficient of kinetic friction between the skis and the snow is 0.210. How far does she travel on the horizontal surface before coming to rest? (1mvB2 2 0) Solution First, let us calculate her speed at the bottom of the incline, which we choose as our zero point of potential energy. Because the incline is frictionless, the mechanical energy of the skier Earth system remains constant, and we find, as we did in the previous example, that vB d (19.8 m/s)2 2(0.210)(9.80 m/s2) 2gh 2(9.80 m/s2)(20.0 m) 19.8 m/s Exercise Now we apply Equation 8.15 as the skier moves along the rough horizontal surface from to . The change in mechanical energy along the horizontal is E fkd, where d is the horizontal displacement. Answer 40.3 m. 20.0 m y x 20.0 d Figure 8.10 The skier slides down the slope and onto a level surface, stopping after a distance d from the bottom of the hill. EXAMPLE 8.7 The Spring-Loaded Popgun tional potential energy of the projectile Earth system to be at the lowest position of the projectile x A , then the initial gravitational potential energy also is zero. The mechanical energy of this system is constant because no nonconservative forces are present. Initially, the only mechanical energy in the system is the elastic potential energy stored in the spring of the gun, Us A kx2/2, where the compression of the spring is x 0.120 m. The projectile rises to a maximum height The launching mechanism of a toy gun consists of a spring of unknown spring constant (Fig. 8.11a). When the spring is compressed 0.120 m, the gun, when fired vertically, is able to launch a 35.0-g projectile to a maximum height of 20.0 m above the position of the projectile before firing. (a) Neglecting all resistive forces, determine the spring constant. Solution Because the projectile starts from rest, the initial kinetic energy is zero. If we take the zero point for the gravita- 228 CHAPTER 8 x C = 20.0 m Potential Energy and Conservation of Energy EA KA 0 Ug A 0 Us A 1 2 2 kx EC KC 0 Ug C mgh Us C 0 1 2 k(0.120 m)2 k (0.0350 kg)(9.80 m/s2)(20.0 m) 953 N/m v (b) Find the speed of the projectile as it moves through the equilibrium position of the spring (where xB 0.120 m) as shown in Figure 8.11b. xB = 0.120 m x xA = 0 x Solution As already noted, the only mechanical energy in the system at is the elastic potential energy kx 2/2. The total energy of the system as the projectile moves through the equilibrium position of the spring comprises the kinetic energy of the projectile mv B2/2, and the gravitational potential energy mgx B . Hence, the principle of the conservation of mechanical energy in this case gives EA KA 0 Solving for v B gives vB Ug A 0 Us A 1 2 2 kx EB KB 1 2 2 mvB Ug B Us B 0 mg xB (a) (b) A spring-loaded popgun. kx2 m 2g xB 2(9.80 m/s2)(0.120 m) (953 N/m)(0.120 m)2 0.0350 kg Figure 8.11 19.7 m/s You should compare the different examples we have presented so far in this chapter. Note how breaking the problem into a sequence of labeled events helps in the analysis. xC h 20.0 m, and so the final gravitational potential energy when the projectile reaches its peak is mgh. The final kinetic energy of the projectile is zero, and the final elastic potential energy stored in the spring is zero. Because the mechanical energy of the system is constant, we find that Exercise Answer What is the speed of the projectile when it is at a height of 10.0 m? 14.0 m/s. EXAMPLE 8.8 Block Spring Collision energy and the spring is uncompressed, so that the elastic potential energy stored in the spring is zero. Thus, the total mechanical energy of the system before the collision is just 1 2 , the spring is fully com2 mvA . After the collision, at pressed; now the block is at rest and so has zero kinetic energy, while the energy stored in the spring has its maximum value 1kx2 1kxm2 , where the origin of coordinates x 0 is 2 2 chosen to be the equilibrium position of the spring and x m is A block having a mass of 0.80 kg is given an initial velocity vA 1.2 m/s to the right and collides with a spring of negligible mass and force constant k 50 N/m, as shown in Figure 8.12. (a) Assuming the surface to be frictionless, calculate the maximum compression of the spring after the collision. Solution Our system in this example consists of the block and spring. Before the collision, at , the block has kinetic 8.5 x=0 vA 1 E = mvA2 2 Work Done by Nonconservative Forces 229 (a) vB (b) xB 1 1 E = mv B2 + kx B2 2 2 vC = 0 (c) xm vD = vA 1 1 E = mv D2 = mvA2 2 2 1 E = kxm2 2 (d) Multiflash photograph of a pole vault event. How many forms of energy can you identify in this picture? Figure 8.12 A block sliding on a smooth, horizontal surface collides with a light spring. (a) Initially the mechanical energy is all kinetic energy. (b) The mechanical energy is the sum of the kinetic energy of the block and the elastic potential energy in the spring. (c) The energy is entirely potential energy. (d) The energy is transformed back to the kinetic energy of the block. The total energy remains constant throughout the motion. of the block at the moment it collides with the spring is vA 1.2 m/s, what is the maximum compression in the spring? Solution In this case, mechanical energy is not conserved because a frictional force acts on the block. The magnitude of the frictional force is the maximum compression of the spring, which in this case happens to be x C . The total mechanical energy of the system is conserved because no nonconservative forces act on objects within the system. Because mechanical energy is conserved, the kinetic energy of the block before the collision must equal the maximum potential energy stored in the fully compressed spring: EA KA 1 2 2 mvA fk kn kmg 0.50(0.80 kg)(9.80 m/s2) 3.92 N Therefore, the change in the block's mechanical energy due to friction as the block is displaced from the equilibrium position of the spring (where we have set our origin) to x B is E fk xB 1 2 2 k xB ) 3.92xB Substituting this into Equation 8.15 gives E Ef Ei (0 (1mvA2 2 3.92xB 0 0) fkxB EC KC 0 Us C 1 2 2 kxm Us A 0 xm 1 2 2 (50)xB 1 2 2 (0.80)(1.2) m v k A 25xB2 0.80 kg (1.2 m/s) 50 N/m 3.92xB 0.576 Solving the quadratic equation for x B gives xB 0.092 m and xB 0.25 m. The physically meaningful root is xB 0.092 m. The negative root does not apply to this situation because the block must be to the right of the origin (positive value of x) when it comes to rest. Note that 0.092 m is less than the distance obtained in the frictionless case of part (a). This result is what we expect because friction retards the motion of the system. 0.15 m Note that we have not included Ug terms because no change in vertical position occurred. (b) Suppose a constant force of kinetic friction acts between the block and the surface, with k 0.50. If the speed 230 CHAPTER 8 Potential Energy and Conservation of Energy EXAMPLE 8.9 Connected Blocks in Motion where Ug Ug f Ug i is the change in the system's gravitational potential energy and Us Usf Usi is the change in the system's elastic potential energy. As the hanging block falls a distance h, the horizontally moving block moves the same distance h to the right. Therefore, using Equation 8.15, we find that the loss in energy due to friction between the horizontally sliding block and the surface is (2) E fk h km1gh Two blocks are connected by a light string that passes over a frictionless pulley, as shown in Figure 8.13. The block of mass m1 lies on a horizontal surface and is connected to a spring of force constant k. The system is released from rest when the spring is unstretched. If the hanging block of mass m 2 falls a distance h before coming to rest, calculate the coefficient of kinetic friction between the block of mass m1 and the surface. Solution The key word rest appears twice in the problem statement, telling us that the initial and final velocities and kinetic energies are zero. (Also note that because we are concerned only with the beginning and ending points of the motion, we do not need to label events with circled letters as we did in the previous two examples. Simply using i and f is sufficient to keep track of the situation.) In this situation, the system consists of the two blocks, the spring, and the Earth. We need to consider two forms of potential energy: gravitational and elastic. Because the initial and final kinetic energies of the system are zero, K 0, and we can write (1) E Ug Us The change in the gravitational potential energy of the system is associated with only the falling block because the vertical coordinate of the horizontally sliding block does not change. Therefore, we obtain (3) Ug Ug f Ugi 0 m2 gh where the coordinates have been measured from the lowest position of the falling block. The change in the elastic potential energy stored in the spring is (4) Us Us f Usi 1 2 2 kh 0 Substituting Equations (2), (3), and (4) into Equation (1) gives m2gh 1kh2 km1gh 2 k m1 k m2g m1g 1 2 kh m2 h Figure 8.13 As the hanging block moves from its highest elevation to its lowest, the system loses gravitational potential energy but gains elastic potential energy in the spring. Some mechanical energy is lost because of friction between the sliding block and the surface. This setup represents a way of measuring the coefficient of kinetic friction between an object and some surface. As you can see from the problem, sometimes it is easier to work with the changes in the various types of energy rather than the actual values. For example, if we wanted to calculate the numerical value of the gravitational potential energy associated with the horizontally sliding block, we would need to specify the height of the horizontal surface relative to the lowest position of the falling block. Fortunately, this is not necessary because the gravitational potential energy associated with the first block does not change. EXAMPLE 8.10 A Grand Entrance stage to the floor. Let us call the angle that the actor's cable makes with the vertical . What is the maximum value can have before the sandbag lifts off the floor? You are designing apparatus to support an actor of mass 65 kg who is to "fly" down to the stage during the performance of a play. You decide to attach the actor's harness to a 130-kg sandbag by means of a lightweight steel cable running smoothly over two frictionless pulleys, as shown in Figure 8.14a. You need 3.0 m of cable between the harness and the nearest pulley so that the pulley can be hidden behind a curtain. For the apparatus to work successfully, the sandbag must never lift above the floor as the actor swings from above the Solution We need to draw on several concepts to solve this problem. First, we use the principle of the conservation of mechanical energy to find the actor's speed as he hits the floor as a function of and the radius R of the circular path through which he swings. Next, we apply Newton's second 8.6 Relationship Between Conservative Forces and Potential Energy 231 law to the actor at the bottom of his path to find the cable tension as a function of the given parameters. Finally, we note that the sandbag lifts off the floor when the upward force exerted on it by the cable exceeds the gravitational force acting on it; the normal force is zero when this happens. Applying conservation of energy to the actor Earth system gives Ki (1) 0 Ui Kf Uf 0 1 2 2 mactorvf where yi is the initial height of the actor above the floor and vf is the speed of the actor at the instant before he lands. (Note that Ki 0 because he starts from rest and that Uf 0 because we set the level of the actor's harness when he is standing on the floor as the zero level of potential energy.) From the geometry in Figure 8.14a, we see that yi R R cos R(1 cos ). Using this relationship in Equation (1), we obtain (2) vf 2 2gR(1 cos ) mactor g yi Now we apply Newton's second law to the actor when he is at the bottom of the circular path, using the free-body diagram in Figure 8.14b as a guide: Fy (3) T T mactorg mactor vf R 2 vf 2 R R mactorg mactor A force of the same magnitude as T is transmitted to the sandbag. If it is to be just lifted off the floor, the normal force on it becomes zero, and we require that T mbagg, as shown in Figure 8.14c. Using this condition together with Equations (2) and (3), we find that mbagg Actor Sandbag mactorg mactor 2gR(1 R cos ) Solving for tain cos and substituting in the given parameters, we ob3mactor mbag 3(65 kg) 130 kg 2(65 kg) 1 2 (a) 2mactor 60 T T m actor m bag Notice that we did not need to be concerned with the length R of the cable from the actor's harness to the leftmost pulley. The important point to be made from this problem is that it is sometimes necessary to combine energy considerations with Newton's laws of motion. m actor g m bag g (b) (c) Figure 8.14 (a) An actor uses some clever staging to make his entrance. (b) Free-body diagram for actor at the bottom of the circular path. (c) Free-body diagram for sandbag. Exercise If the initial angle 40, find the speed of the actor and the tension in the cable just before he reaches the floor. (Hint: You cannot ignore the length R 3.0 m in this calculation.) Answer 3.7 m/s; 940 N. 8.6 RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN CONSERVATIVE FORCES AND POTENTIAL ENERGY Once again let us consider a particle that is part of a system. Suppose that the particle moves along the x axis, and assume that a conservative force with an x compo- 232 CHAPTER 8 Potential Energy and Conservation of Energy nent Fx acts on the particle. Earlier in this chapter, we showed how to determine the change in potential energy of a system when we are given the conservative force. We now show how to find Fx if the potential energy of the system is known. In Section 8.2 we learned that the work done by the conservative force as its point of application undergoes a displacement x equals the negative of the change in the potential energy associated with that force; that is, W Fx x U. If the point of application of the force undergoes an infinitesimal displacement dx, we can express the infinitesimal change in the potential energy of the system dU as dU Fx dx Therefore, the conservative force is related to the potential energy function through the relationship3 Relationship between force and potential energy Fx dU dx (8.16) That is, any conservative force acting on an object within a system equals the negative derivative of the potential energy of the system with respect to x. We can easily check this relationship for the two examples already discussed. In the case of the deformed spring, Us 1kx2, and therefore 2 Fs dUs dx d 1 2 ( kx ) dx 2 kx which corresponds to the restoring force in the spring. Because the gravitational potential energy function is Ug mgy, it follows from Equation 8.16 that Fg mg when we differentiate Ug with respect to y instead of x. We now see that U is an important function because a conservative force can be derived from it. Furthermore, Equation 8.16 should clarify the fact that adding a constant to the potential energy is unimportant because the derivative of a constant is zero. Quick Quiz 8.5 What does the slope of a graph of U(x) versus x represent? Optional Section 8.7 ENERGY DIAGRAMS AND THE EQUILIBRIUM OF A SYSTEM The motion of a system can often be understood qualitatively through a graph of its potential energy versus the separation distance between the objects in the system. Consider the potential energy function for a block spring system, given by Us 1kx2. This function is plotted versus x in Figure 8.15a. (A common mistake is 2 to think that potential energy on the graph represents height. This is clearly not 3 U U U U j k , where , and so forth, are x y z x partial derivatives. In the language of vector calculus, F equals the negative of the gradient of the scalar quantity U(x, y, z). In three dimensions, the expression is F i 8.7 Energy Diagrams and the Equilibrium of a System 233 Us Us = 1 2 kx 2 E xm 0 xm x (a) m x=0 (b) xm Figure 8.15 (a) Potential energy as a function of x for the block spring system shown in (b). The block oscillates between the turning points, which have the coordinates x xm . Note that the restoring force exerted by the spring always acts toward x 0, the position of stable equilibrium. the case here, where the block is only moving horizontally.) The force Fs exerted by the spring on the block is related to Us through Equation 8.16: Fs dUs dx kx As we saw in Quick Quiz 8.5, the force is equal to the negative of the slope of the U versus x curve. When the block is placed at rest at the equilibrium position of the spring (x 0), where Fs 0, it will remain there unless some external force Fext acts on it. If this external force stretches the spring from equilibrium, x is positive and the slope dU/dx is positive; therefore, the force Fs exerted by the spring is negative, and the block accelerates back toward x 0 when released. If the external force compresses the spring, then x is negative and the slope is negative; therefore, Fs is positive, and again the mass accelerates toward x 0 upon release. From this analysis, we conclude that the x 0 position for a block spring system is one of stable equilibrium. That is, any movement away from this position results in a force directed back toward x 0. In general, positions of stable equilibrium correspond to points for which U(x) is a minimum. From Figure 8.15 we see that if the block is given an initial displacement xm and is released from rest, its total energy initially is the potential energy stored in 1 the spring 2kxm2. As the block starts to move, the system acquires kinetic energy and loses an equal amount of potential energy. Because the total energy must remain constant, the block oscillates (moves back and forth) between the two points x xm and x xm , called the turning points. In fact, because no energy is lost (no friction), the block will oscillate between xm and xm forever. (We discuss these oscillations further in Chapter 13.) From an energy viewpoint, the energy of the system cannot exceed 1kxm2; therefore, the block must stop at these points 2 and, because of the spring force, must accelerate toward x 0. Another simple mechanical system that has a position of stable equilibrium is a ball rolling about in the bottom of a bowl. Anytime the ball is displaced from its lowest position, it tends to return to that position when released. 234 CHAPTER 8 Potential Energy and Conservation of Energy U Positive slope x<0 Negative slope x>0 0 x Figure 8.16 A plot of U versus x for a particle that has a position of unstable equilibrium located at x 0. For any finite displacement of the particle, the force on the particle is directed away from x 0. Now consider a particle moving along the x axis under the influence of a conservative force Fx , where the U versus x curve is as shown in Figure 8.16. Once again, Fx 0 at x 0, and so the particle is in equilibrium at this point. However, this is a position of unstable equilibrium for the following reason: Suppose that the particle is displaced to the right (x 0). Because the slope is negative for x 0, Fx dU/dx is positive and the particle accelerates away from x 0. If instead the particle is at x 0 and is displaced to the left (x 0), the force is negative because the slope is positive for x 0, and the particle again accelerates away from the equilibrium position. The position x 0 in this situation is one of unstable equilibrium because for any displacement from this point, the force pushes the particle farther away from equilibrium. The force pushes the particle toward a position of lower potential energy. A pencil balanced on its point is in a position of unstable equilibrium. If the pencil is displaced slightly from its absolutely vertical position and is then released, it will surely fall over. In general, positions of unstable equilibrium correspond to points for which U(x) is a maximum. Finally, a situation may arise where U is constant over some region and hence Fx 0. This is called a position of neutral equilibrium. Small displacements from this position produce neither restoring nor disrupting forces. A ball lying on a flat horizontal surface is an example of an object in neutral equilibrium. EXAMPLE 8.11 Force and Energy on an Atomic Scale are at their critical separation, and then increases again as the atoms move apart. When U(x) is a minimum, the atoms are in stable equilbrium; this indicates that this is the most likely separation between them. (b) Determine Fx(x) -- the force that one atom exerts on the other in the molecule as a function of separation -- and argue that the way this force behaves is physically plausible when the atoms are close together and far apart. The potential energy associated with the force between two neutral atoms in a molecule can be modeled by the Lennard Jones potential energy function: 12 6 U(x) 4 x x where x is the separation of the atoms. The function U(x) contains two parameters and that are determined from experiments. Sample values for the interaction between two atoms in a molecule are 0.263 nm and 1.51 10 22 J. (a) Using a spreadsheet or similar tool, graph this function and find the most likely distance between the two atoms. Solution We expect to find stable equilibrium when the two atoms are separated by some equilibrium distance and the potential energy of the system of two atoms (the molecule) is a minimum. One can minimize the function U(x) by taking its derivative and setting it equal to zero: dU(x) dx 4 4 d dx 12 6 Solution Because the atoms combine to form a molecule, we reason that the force must be attractive when the atoms are far apart. On the other hand, the force must be repulsive when the two atoms get very close together. Otherwise, the molecule would collapse in on itself. Thus, the force must change sign at the critical separation, similar to the way spring forces switch sign in the change from extension to compression. Applying Equation 8.16 to the Lennard Jones potential energy function gives Fx dU(x) dx 4 d dx 12 12 x13 12 6 x 12 x13 12 x 6 6 x7 0 0 x 6 6 x7 x Solving for x -- the equilibrium separation of the two atoms in the molecule -- and inserting the given information yield x 2.95 10 10 4 m. We graph the Lennard Jones function on both sides of this critical value to create our energy diagram, as shown in Figure 8.17a. Notice how U(x) is extremely large when the atoms are very close together, is a minimum when the atoms This result is graphed in Figure 8.17b. As expected, the force is positive (repulsive) at small atomic separations, zero when the atoms are at the position of stable equilibrium [recall how we found the minimum of U(x)], and negative (attractive) at greater separations. Note that the force approaches zero as the separation between the atoms becomes very great. 8.8 U ( J ) 1023 5.0 0 5.0 10 15 20 2.5 3.0 3.5 4.0 Conservation of Energy in General 235 x (m) 1010 4.5 (a) 5.0 5.5 6.0 F(N) 1012 6.0 3.0 0 3.0 6.0 2.5 x (m) 1010 3.0 3.5 4.0 (b) 4.5 5.0 5.5 6.0 Figure 8.17 (a) Potential energy curve associated with a molecule. The distance x is the separation between the two atoms making up the molecule. (b) Force exerted on one atom by the other. 8.8 CONSERVATION OF ENERGY IN GENERAL We have seen that the total mechanical energy of a system is constant when only conservative forces act within the system. Furthermore, we can associate a potential energy function with each conservative force. On the other hand, as we saw in Section 8.5, mechanical energy is lost when nonconservative forces such as friction are present. In our study of thermodynamics later in this course, we shall find that mechanical energy can be transformed into energy stored inside the various objects that make up the system. This form of energy is called internal energy. For example, when a block slides over a rough surface, the mechanical energy lost because of friction is transformed into internal energy that is stored temporarily inside the block and inside the surface, as evidenced by a measurable increase in the temperature of both block and surface. We shall see that on a submicroscopic scale, this internal energy is associated with the vibration of atoms about their equilibrium positions. Such internal atomic motion involves both kinetic and potential energy. Therefore, if we include in our energy expression this increase in the internal energy of the objects that make up the system, then energy is conserved. This is just one example of how you can analyze an isolated system and always find that the total amount of energy it contains does not change, as long as you account for all forms of energy. That is, energy can never be created or destroyed. Energy may be transformed from one form to another, but the Total energy is always conserved 236 CHAPTER 8 Potential Energy and Conservation of Energy total energy of an isolated system is always constant. From a universal point of view, we can say that the total energy of the Universe is constant. If one part of the Universe gains energy in some form, then another part must lose an equal amount of energy. No violation of this principle has ever been found. Optional Section 8.9 MASS ENERGY EQUIVALENCE This chapter has been concerned with the important principle of energy conservation and its application to various physical phenomena. Another important principle, conservation of mass, states that in any physical or chemical process, mass is neither created nor destroyed. That is, the mass before the process equals the mass after the process. For centuries, scientists believed that energy and mass were two quantities that were separately conserved. However, in 1905 Einstein made the brilliant discovery that the mass of any system is a measure of the energy of that system. Hence, energy and mass are related concepts. The relationship between the two is given by Einstein's most famous formula: ER mc 2 (8.17) where c is the speed of light and E R is the energy equivalent of a mass m. The subscript R on the energy refers to the rest energy of an object of mass m -- that is, the energy of the object when its speed is v 0. The rest energy associated with even a small amount of matter is enormous. For example, the rest energy of 1 kg of any substance is ER mc 2 (1 kg)(3 10 8 m/s)2 9 10 16 J This is equivalent to the energy content of about 15 million barrels of crude oil -- about one day's consumption in the United States! If this energy could easily be released as useful work, our energy resources would be unlimited. In reality, only a small fraction of the energy contained in a material sample can be released through chemical or nuclear processes. The effects are greatest in nuclear reactions, in which fractional changes in energy, and hence mass, of approximately 10 3 are routinely observed. A good example is the enormous amount of energy released when the uranium-235 nucleus splits into two smaller nuclei. This happens because the sum of the masses of the product nuclei is slightly less than the mass of the original 235 U nucleus. The awesome nature of the energy released in such reactions is vividly demonstrated in the explosion of a nuclear weapon. Equation 8.17 indicates that energy has mass. Whenever the energy of an object changes in any way, its mass changes as well. If E is the change in energy of an object, then its change in mass is m E c2 (8.18) Anytime energy E in any form is supplied to an object, the change in the mass of the object is m E/c 2. However, because c 2 is so large, the changes in mass in any ordinary mechanical experiment or chemical reaction are too small to be detected. 8.10 Quantization of Energy 237 EXAMPLE 8.12 Here Comes the Sun The Sun radiates uniformly in all directions, and so only a very tiny fraction of its total output is collected by the Earth. Nonetheless this amount is sufficient to supply energy to nearly everything on the Earth. (Nuclear and geothermal energy are the only alternatives.) Plants absorb solar energy and convert it to chemical potential energy (energy stored in the plant's molecules). When an animal eats the plant, this chemical potential energy can be turned into kinetic and other forms of energy. You are reading this book with solarpowered eyes! The Sun converts an enormous amount of matter to energy. Each second, 4.19 109 kg -- approximately the capacity of 400 average-sized cargo ships -- is changed to energy. What is the power output of the Sun? Solution We find the energy liberated per second by means of a straightforward conversion: ER (4.19 109 kg)(3.00 108 m/s)2 3.77 1026 J We then apply the definition of power: 3.77 1026 J 1.00 s 3.77 1026 W Optional Section 8.10 QUANTIZATION OF ENERGY Certain physical quantities such as electric charge are quantized; that is, the quantities have discrete values rather than continuous values. The quantized nature of energy is especially important in the atomic and subatomic world. As an example, let us consider the energy levels of the hydrogen atom (which consists of an electron orbiting around a proton). The atom can occupy only certain energy levels, called quantum states, as shown in Figure 8.18a. The atom cannot have any energy values lying between these quantum states. The lowest energy level E 1 is called the E E4 E3 E2 Energy (arbitrary units) E1 Energy Hydrogen atom (a) Earth satellite (b) Figure 8.18 Energy-level diagrams: (a) Quantum states of the hydrogen atom. The lowest state E 1 is the ground state. (b) The energy levels of an Earth satellite are also quantized but are so close together that they cannot be distinguished from one another. 238 CHAPTER 8 Potential Energy and Conservation of Energy ground state of the atom. The ground state corresponds to the state that an isolated atom usually occupies. The atom can move to higher energy states by absorbing energy from some external source or by colliding with other atoms. The highest energy on the scale shown in Figure 8.18a, E , corresponds to the energy of the atom when the electron is completely removed from the proton. The energy difference E E1 is called the ionization energy. Note that the energy levels get closer together at the high end of the scale. Next, consider a satellite in orbit about the Earth. If you were asked to describe the possible energies that the satellite could have, it would be reasonable (but incorrect) to say that it could have any arbitrary energy value. Just like that of the hydrogen atom, however, the energy of the satellite is quantized. If you were to construct an energy level diagram for the satellite showing its allowed energies, the levels would be so close to one another, as shown in Figure 8.18b, that it would be difficult to discern that they were not continuous. In other words, we have no way of experiencing quantization of energy in the macroscopic world; hence, we can ignore it in describing everyday experiences. SUMMARY If a particle of mass m is at a distance y above the Earth's surface, the gravitational potential energy of the particle Earth system is Ug mgy 1 2 2 kx (8.1) The elastic potential energy stored in a spring of force constant k is Us (8.4) You should be able to apply these two equations in a variety of situations to determine the potential an object has to perform work. A force is conservative if the work it does on a particle moving between two points is independent of the path the particle takes between the two points. Furthermore, a force is conservative if the work it does on a particle is zero when the particle moves through an arbitrary closed path and returns to its initial position. A force that does not meet these criteria is said to be nonconservative. A potential energy function U can be associated only with a conservative force. If a conservative force F acts on a particle that moves along the x axis from x i to xf , then the change in the potential energy of the system equals the negative of the work done by that force: xf Uf Ui xi Fx dx (8.7) You should be able to use calculus to find the potential energy associated with a conservative force and vice versa. The total mechanical energy of a system is defined as the sum of the kinetic energy and the potential energy: E K U (8.9) If no external forces do work on a system and if no nonconservative forces are acting on objects inside the system, then the total mechanical energy of the system is constant: Ki Ui Kf Uf (8.10) Problems 239 If nonconservative forces (such as friction) act on objects inside a system, then mechanical energy is not conserved. In these situations, the difference between the total final mechanical energy and the total initial mechanical energy of the system equals the energy transferred to or from the system by the nonconservative forces. QUESTIONS 1. Many mountain roads are constructed so that they spiral around a mountain rather than go straight up the slope. Discuss this design from the viewpoint of energy and power. 2. A ball is thrown straight up into the air. At what position is its kinetic energy a maximum? At what position is the gravitational potential energy a maximum? 3. A bowling ball is suspended from the ceiling of a lecture hall by a strong cord. The bowling ball is drawn away from its equilibrium position and released from rest at the tip of the student's nose as in Figure Q8.3. If the student remains stationary, explain why she will not be struck by the ball on its return swing. Would the student be safe if she pushed the ball as she released it? One person drops a ball from the top of a building, while another person at the bottom observes its motion. Will these two people agree on the value of the potential energy of the ball Earth system? on its change in potential energy? on the kinetic energy of the ball? When a person runs in a track event at constant velocity, is any work done? (Note: Although the runner moves with constant velocity, the legs and arms accelerate.) How does air resistance enter into the picture? Does the center of mass of the runner move horizontally? Our body muscles exert forces when we lift, push, run, jump, and so forth. Are these forces conservative? If three conservative forces and one nonconservative force act on a system, how many potential energy terms appear in the equation that describes this system? Consider a ball fixed to one end of a rigid rod whose other end pivots on a horizontal axis so that the rod can rotate in a vertical plane. What are the positions of stable and unstable equilibrium? Is it physically possible to have a situation where E U 0? What would the curve of U versus x look like if a particle were in a region of neutral equilibrium? Explain the energy transformations that occur during (a) the pole vault, (b) the shot put, (c) the high jump. What is the source of energy in each case? Discuss some of the energy transformations that occur during the operation of an automobile. If only one external force acts on a particle, does it necessarily change the particle's (a) kinetic energy? (b) velocity? 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. Figure Q8.3 PROBLEMS 1, 2, 3 = straightforward, intermediate, challenging = full solution available in the Student Solutions Manual and Study Guide WEB = solution posted at http://www.saunderscollege.com/physics/ = Computer useful in solving problem = Interactive Physics = paired numerical/symbolic problems Section 8.1 Potential Energy Section 8.2 Conservative and Nonconservative Forces 1. A 1 000-kg roller coaster is initially at the top of a rise, at point A. It then moves 135 ft, at an angle of 40.0 below the horizontal, to a lower point B. (a) Choose point B to be the zero level for gravitational potential energy. Find the potential energy of the roller coaster Earth system at points A and B and the change in its potential energy as the coaster moves. (b) Repeat part (a), setting the zero reference level at point A. 240 CHAPTER 8 Potential Energy and Conservation of Energy time tf ? (b) If the potential energy of the system at time tf is 5.00 J, are any nonconservative forces acting on the particle? Explain. A single conservative force acts on a 5.00-kg particle. The equation F x (2x 4) N, where x is in meters, describes this force. As the particle moves along the x axis from x 1.00 m to x 5.00 m, calculate (a) the work done by this force, (b) the change in the potential energy of the system, and (c) the kinetic energy of the particle at x 5.00 m if its speed at x 1.00 m is 3.00 m/s. A single constant force F (3i 5j) N acts on a 4.00-kg particle. (a) Calculate the work done by this force if the particle moves from the origin to the point having the vector position r (2i 3j) m. Does this result depend on the path? Explain. (b) What is the speed of the particle at r if its speed at the origin is 4.00 m/s? (c) What is the change in the potential energy of the system? A single conservative force acting on a particle varies as F ( Ax Bx 2)i N, where A and B are constants and x is in meters. (a) Calculate the potential energy function U(x) associated with this force, taking U 0 at x 0. (b) Find the change in potential energy and change in kinetic energy as the particle moves from x 2.00 m to x 3.00 m. A particle of mass 0.500 kg is shot from P as shown in Figure P8.10. The particle has an initial velocity vi with a horizontal component of 30.0 m/s. The particle rises to a maximum height of 20.0 m above P. Using the law of conservation of energy, determine (a) the vertical component of vi , (b) the work done by the gravitational force on the particle during its motion from P to B, and (c) the horizontal and the vertical components of the velocity vector when the particle reaches B. 2. A 40.0-N child is in a swing that is attached to ropes 2.00 m long. Find the gravitational potential energy of the child Earth system relative to the child's lowest position when (a) the ropes are horizontal, (b) the ropes make a 30.0 angle with the vertical, and (c) the child is at the bottom of the circular arc. 3. A 4.00-kg particle moves from the origin to position C, which has coordinates x 5.00 m and y 5.00 m (Fig. P8.3). One force on it is the force of gravity acting in the negative y direction. Using Equation 7.2, calculate the work done by gravity as the particle moves from O to C along (a) OAC, (b) OBC, and (c) OC. Your results should all be identical. Why? WEB 7. 8. y B C (5.00, 5.00) m 9. O A x Figure P8.3 Problems 3, 4, and 5. 10. 4. (a) Suppose that a constant force acts on an object. The force does not vary with time, nor with the position or velocity of the object. Start with the general definition for work done by a force f W i F ds and show that the force is conservative. (b) As a special case, suppose that the force F (3i 4j) N acts on a particle that moves from O to C in Figure P8.3. Calculate the work done by F if the particle moves along each one of the three paths OAC, OBC, and OC. (Your three answers should be identical.) 5. A force acting on a particle moving in the xy plane is given by F (2 y i x 2 j) N, where x and y are in meters. The particle moves from the origin to a final position having coordinates x 5.00 m and y 5.00 m, as in Figure P8.3. Calculate the work done by F along (a) OAC, (b) OBC, (c) OC. (d) Is F conservative or nonconservative? Explain. vi P 20.0 m 60.0 m g A B Figure P8.10 11. A 3.00-kg mass starts from rest and slides a distance d down a frictionless 30.0 incline. While sliding, it comes into contact with an unstressed spring of negligible mass, as shown in Figure P8.11. The mass slides an additional 0.200 m as it is brought momentarily to rest by compression of the spring (k 400 N/m). Find the initial separation d between the mass and the spring. Section 8.3 Section 8.4 Conservative Forces and Potential Energy Conservation of Mechanical Energy 6. At time ti , the kinetic energy of a particle in a system is 30.0 J and the potential energy of the system is 10.0 J. At some later time tf , the kinetic energy of the particle is 18.0 J. (a) If only conservative forces act on the particle, what are the potential energy and the total energy at Problems 241 12. A mass m starts from rest and slides a distance d down a frictionless incline of angle . While sliding, it contacts an unstressed spring of negligible mass, as shown in Figure P8.11. The mass slides an additional distance x as it is brought momentarily to rest by compression of the spring (of force constant k). Find the initial separation d between the mass and the spring. A h R m = 3.00 kg d k = 400 N/m Figure P8.15 cal spring of constant k 5 000 N/m and is pushed downward so that the spring is compressed 0.100 m. After the block is released, it travels upward and then leaves the spring. To what maximum height above the point of release does it rise? 18. Dave Johnson, the bronze medalist at the 1992 Olympic decathlon in Barcelona, leaves the ground for his high jump with a vertical velocity component of 6.00 m/s. How far up does his center of gravity move as he makes the jump? 19. A 0.400-kg ball is thrown straight up into the air and reaches a maximum altitude of 20.0 m. Taking its initial position as the point of zero potential energy and using energy methods, find (a) its initial speed, (b) its total mechanical energy, and (c) the ratio of its kinetic energy to the potential energy of the ball Earth system when the ball is at an altitude of 10.0 m. 20. In the dangerous "sport" of bungee-jumping, a daring student jumps from a balloon with a specially designed = 30.0 Figure P8.11 Problems 11 and 12. 13. A particle of mass m 5.00 kg is released from point and slides on the frictionless track shown in Figure P8.13. Determine (a) the particle's speed at points and and (b) the net work done by the force of gravity in moving the particle from to . m 5.00 m 3.20 m 2.00 m Figure P8.13 14. A simple, 2.00-m-long pendulum is released from rest when the support string is at an angle of 25.0 from the vertical. What is the speed of the suspended mass at the bottom of the swing? 15. A bead slides without friction around a loop-the-loop (Fig. P8.15). If the bead is released from a height h 3.50R, what is its speed at point A? How great is the normal force on it if its mass is 5.00 g? 16. A 120-g mass is attached to the bottom end of an unstressed spring. The spring is hanging vertically and has a spring constant of 40.0 N/m. The mass is dropped. (a) What is its maximum speed? (b) How far does it drop before coming to rest momentarily? 17. A block of mass 0.250 kg is placed on top of a light verti- Figure P8.20 Bungee-jumping. (Gamma) 242 CHAPTER 8 Potential Energy and Conservation of Energy cal circular arc (Fig. P8.25). Suppose a performer with mass m and holding the bar steps off an elevated platform, starting from rest with the ropes at an angle of i with respect to the vertical. Suppose the size of the performer's body is small compared with the length , that she does not pump the trapeze to swing higher, and that air resistance is negligible. (a) Show that when the ropes make an angle of with respect to the vertical, the performer must exert a force F mg (3 cos 2 cos i) elastic cord attached to his ankles, as shown in Figure P8.20. The unstretched length of the cord is 25.0 m, the student weighs 700 N, and the balloon is 36.0 m above the surface of a river below. Assuming that Hooke's law describes the cord, calculate the required force constant if the student is to stop safely 4.00 m above the river. 21. Two masses are connected by a light string passing over a light frictionless pulley, as shown in Figure P8.21. The 5.00-kg mass is released from rest. Using the law of conservation of energy, (a) determine the speed of the 3.00kg mass just as the 5.00-kg mass hits the ground and (b) find the maximum height to which the 3.00-kg mass rises. 22. Two masses are connected by a light string passing over a light frictionless pulley, as shown in Figure P8.21. The mass m1 (which is greater than m 2) is released from rest. Using the law of conservation of energy, (a) determine the speed of m 2 just as m1 hits the ground in terms of m 1, m 2, and h, and (b) find the maximum height to which m 2 rises. in order to hang on. (b) Determine the angle i at which the force required to hang on at the bottom of the swing is twice the performer's weight. m1 5.00 kg m2 3.00 kg h 4.00 m Figure P8.25 Figure P8.21 Problems 21 and 22. 23. A 20.0-kg cannon ball is fired from a cannon with a muzzle speed of 1 000 m/s at an angle of 37.0 with the horizontal. A second ball is fired at an angle of 90.0. Use the law of conservation of mechanical energy to find (a) the maximum height reached by each ball and (b) the total mechanical energy at the maximum height for each ball. Let y 0 at the cannon. 24. A 2.00-kg ball is attached to the bottom end of a length of 10-lb (44.5-N) fishing line. The top end of the fishing line is held stationary. The ball is released from rest while the line is taut and horizontal ( 90.0). At what angle (measured from the vertical) will the fishing line break? 25. The circus apparatus known as the trapeze consists of a bar suspended by two parallel ropes, each of length . The trapeze allows circus performers to swing in a verti- 26. After its release at the top of the first rise, a rollercoaster car moves freely with negligible friction. The roller coaster shown in Figure P8.26 has a circular loop of radius 20.0 m. The car barely makes it around the loop: At the top of the loop, the riders are upside down and feel weightless. (a) Find the speed of the roller coaster car at the top of the loop (position 3). Find the speed of the roller coaster car (b) at position 1 and (c) at position 2. (d) Find the difference in height between positions 1 and 4 if the speed at position 4 is 10.0 m/s. 27. A light rigid rod is 77.0 cm long. Its top end is pivoted on a low-friction horizontal axle. The rod hangs straight down at rest, with a small massive ball attached to its bottom end. You strike the ball, suddenly giving it a horizontal velocity so that it swings around in a full circle. What minimum speed at the bottom is required to make the ball go over the top of the circle? Problems 3.00 kg 3 4 243 2 5.00 kg Figure P8.31 1 Figure P8.26 Section 8.5 Work Done by Nonconservative Forces 28. A 70.0-kg diver steps off a 10.0-m tower and drops straight down into the water. If he comes to rest 5.00 m beneath the surface of the water, determine the average resistance force that the water exerts on the diver. 29. A force Fx , shown as a function of distance in Figure P8.29, acts on a 5.00-kg mass. If the particle starts from rest at x 0 m, determine the speed of the particle at x 2.00, 4.00, and 6.00 m. 32. A 2 000-kg car starts from rest and coasts down from the top of a 5.00-m-long driveway that is sloped at an angle of 20.0 with the horizontal. If an average friction force of 4 000 N impedes the motion of the car, find the speed of the car at the bottom of the driveway. 33. A 5.00-kg block is set into motion up an inclined plane with an initial speed of 8.00 m/s (Fig. P8.33). The block comes to rest after traveling 3.00 m along the plane, which is inclined at an angle of 30.0 to the horizontal. For this motion determine (a) the change in the block's kinetic energy, (b) the change in the potential energy, and (c) the frictional force exerted on it (assumed to be constant). (d) What is the coefficient of kinetic friction? v i = 8.00 m/s Fx(N) 5 4 3 2 1 0 3.00 m 30.0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 x(m) Figure P8.33 Figure P8.29 30. A softball pitcher swings a ball of mass 0.250 kg around a vertical circular path of radius 60.0 cm before releasing it from her hand. The pitcher maintains a component of force on the ball of constant magnitude 30.0 N in the direction of motion around the complete path. The speed of the ball at the top of the circle is 15.0 m/s. If the ball is released at the bottom of the circle, what is its speed upon release? 31. The coefficient of friction between the 3.00-kg block and the surface in Figure P8.31 is 0.400. The system starts from rest. What is the speed of the 5.00-kg ball when it has fallen 1.50 m? 34. A boy in a wheelchair (total mass, 47.0 kg) wins a race with a skateboarder. He has a speed of 1.40 m/s at the crest of a slope 2.60 m high and 12.4 m long. At the bottom of the slope, his speed is 6.20 m/s. If air resistance and rolling resistance can be modeled as a constant frictional force of 41.0 N, find the work he did in pushing forward on his wheels during the downhill ride. 35. A parachutist of mass 50.0 kg jumps out of a balloon at a height of 1 000 m and lands on the ground with a speed of 5.00 m/s. How much energy was lost to air friction during this jump? 36. An 80.0-kg sky diver jumps out of a balloon at an altitude of 1 000 m and opens the parachute at an altitude of 200.0 m. (a) Assuming that the total retarding force WEB 244 CHAPTER 8 Potential Energy and Conservation of Energy 42. A potential energy function for a two-dimensional force is of the form U 3x 3y 7x. Find the force that acts at the point (x, y). (Optional) on the diver is constant at 50.0 N with the parachute closed and constant at 3 600 N with the parachute open, what is the speed of the diver when he lands on the ground? (b) Do you think the sky diver will get hurt? Explain. (c) At what height should the parachute be opened so that the final speed of the sky diver when he hits the ground is 5.00 m/s? (d) How realistic is the assumption that the total retarding force is constant? Explain. 37. A toy cannon uses a spring to project a 5.30-g soft rubber ball. The spring is originally compressed by 5.00 cm and has a stiffness constant of 8.00 N/m. When it is fired, the ball moves 15.0 cm through the barrel of the cannon, and there is a constant frictional force of 0.032 0 N between the barrel and the ball. (a) With what speed does the projectile leave the barrel of the cannon? (b) At what point does the ball have maximum speed? (c) What is this maximum speed? 38. A 1.50-kg mass is held 1.20 m above a relaxed, massless vertical spring with a spring constant of 320 N/m. The mass is dropped onto the spring. (a) How far does it compress the spring? (b) How far would it compress the spring if the same experiment were performed on the Moon, where g 1.63 m/s2? (c) Repeat part (a), but this time assume that a constant air-resistance force of 0.700 N acts on the mass during its motion. 39. A 3.00-kg block starts at a height h 60.0 cm on a plane that has an inclination angle of 30.0, as shown in Figure P8.39. Upon reaching the bottom, the block slides along a horizontal surface. If the coefficient of friction on both surfaces is k 0.200, how far does the block slide on the horizontal surface before coming to rest? (Hint: Divide the path into two straight-line parts.) Section 8.7 System Energy Diagrams and the Equilibrium of a 43. A particle moves along a line where the potential energy depends on its position r, as graphed in Figure P8.43. In the limit as r increases without bound, U(r) approaches 1 J. (a) Identify each equilibrium position for this particle. Indicate whether each is a point of stable, unstable, or neutral equilibrium. (b) The particle will be bound if its total energy is in what range? Now suppose the particle has energy 3 J. Determine (c) the range of positions where it can be found, (d) its maximum kinetic energy, (e) the location at which it has maximum kinetic energy, and (f) its binding energy -- that is, the additional energy that it would have to be given in order for it to move out to r : . U( J) +6 +4 +2 0 2 4 6 2 4 6 r(mm) m = 3.00 kg h = 60.0 cm Figure P8.43 = 30.0 Figure P8.39 40. A 75.0-kg sky diver is falling with a terminal speed of 60.0 m/s. Determine the rate at which he is losing mechanical energy. Section 8.6 WEB Relationship Between Conservative Forces and Potential Energy 41. The potential energy of a two-particle system separated by a distance r is given by U(r) A/r, where A is a constant. Find the radial force Fr that each particle exerts on the other. 44. A right circular cone can be balanced on a horizontal surface in three different ways. Sketch these three equilibrium configurations and identify them as positions of stable, unstable, or neutral equilibrium. 45. For the potential energy curve shown in Figure P8.45, (a) determine whether the force Fx is positive, negative, or zero at the five points indicated. (b) Indicate points of stable, unstable, and neutral equilibrium. (c) Sketch the curve for Fx versus x from x 0 to x 9.5 m. 46. A hollow pipe has one or two weights attached to its inner surface, as shown in Figure P8.46. Characterize each configuration as being stable, unstable, or neutral equilibrium and explain each of your choices ("CM" indicates center of mass). 47. A particle of mass m is attached between two identical springs on a horizontal frictionless tabletop. The Problems (Optional) 245 U (J) 6 4 2 0 2 4 2 4 6 8 x(m) Section 8.9 Mass Energy Equivalence 48. Find the energy equivalents of (a) an electron of mass 9.11 10 31 kg, (b) a uranium atom with a mass of 4.00 10 25 kg, (c) a paper clip of mass 2.00 g, and (d) the Earth (of mass 5.99 1024 kg). 49. The expression for the kinetic energy of a particle moving with speed v is given by Equation 7.19, which can be written as K mc 2 mc 2, where [1 (v/c)2] 1/2. The term mc 2 is the total energy of the particle, and the term mc 2 is its rest energy. A proton moves with a speed of 0.990c, where c is the speed of light. Find (a) its rest energy, (b) its total energy, and (c) its kinetic energy. Figure P8.45 ADDITIONAL PROBLEMS 50. A block slides down a curved frictionless track and then up an inclined plane as in Figure P8.50. The coefficient of kinetic friction between the block and the incline is k . Use energy methods to show that the maximum height reached by the block is y max h 1 k O CM O CM O CM cot (a) (b) (c) Figure P8.46 springs have spring constant k, and each is initially unstressed. (a) If the mass is pulled a distance x along a direction perpendicular to the initial configuration of the springs, as in Figure P8.47, show that the potential energy of the system is U(x) kx 2 2kL(L h ymax x 2 L 2) (Hint: See Problem 66 in Chapter 7.) (b) Make a plot of U(x) versus x and identify all equilibrium points. Assume that L 1.20 m and k 40.0 N/m. (c) If the mass is pulled 0.500 m to the right and then released, what is its speed when it reaches the equilibrium point x 0? Figure P8.50 51. Close to the center of a campus is a tall silo topped with a hemispherical cap. The cap is frictionless when wet. Someone has somehow balanced a pumpkin at the highest point. The line from the center of curvature of the cap to the pumpkin makes an angle i 0 with the vertical. On a rainy night, a breath of wind makes the pumpkin start sliding downward from rest. It loses contact with the cap when the line from the center of the hemisphere to the pumpkin makes a certain angle with the vertical; what is this angle? 52. A 200-g particle is released from rest at point along the horizontal diameter on the inside of a frictionless, hemispherical bowl of radius R 30.0 cm (Fig. P8.52). Calculate (a) the gravitational potential energy when the particle is at point relative to point , (b) the kinetic energy of the particle at point , (c) its speed at point , and (d) its kinetic energy and the potential energy at point . k L x L m x k Top View Figure P8.47 246 CHAPTER 8 Potential Energy and Conservation of Energy R 2R/3 Figure P8.52 Problems 52 and 53. WEB 53. The particle described in Problem 52 (Fig. P8.52) is released from rest at , and the surface of the bowl is rough. The speed of the particle at is 1.50 m/s. (a) What is its kinetic energy at ? (b) How much energy is lost owing to friction as the particle moves from to ? (c) Is it possible to determine from these results in any simple manner? Explain. 54. Review Problem. The mass of a car is 1 500 kg. The shape of the body is such that its aerodynamic drag coefficient is D 0.330 and the frontal area is 2.50 m2. Assuming that the drag force is proportional to v 2 and neglecting other sources of friction, calculate the power the car requires to maintain a speed of 100 km/h as it climbs a long hill sloping at 3.20. 55. Make an order-of-magnitude estimate of your power output as you climb stairs. In your solution, state the physical quantities you take as data and the values you measure or estimate for them. Do you consider your peak power or your sustainable power? 56. A child's pogo stick (Fig. P8.56) stores energy in a spring (k 2.50 104 N/m). At position (xA 0.100 m), the spring compression is a maximum and the child is momentarily at rest. At position (x B 0), the spring is relaxed and the child is moving upward. At position , the child is again momentarily at rest at the top of the jump. Assuming that the combined mass of the child and the pogo stick is 25.0 kg, (a) calculate the total energy of the system if both potential energies are zero at x 0, (b) determine x C , (c) calculate the speed of the child at x 0, (d) determine the value of x for xC xA Figure P8.56 which the kinetic energy of the system is a maximum, and (e) calculate the child's maximum upward speed. 57. A 10.0-kg block is released from point in Figure P8.57. The track is frictionless except for the portion between and , which has a length of 6.00 m. The block travels down the track, hits a spring of force constant k 2 250 N/m, and compresses the spring 0.300 m from its equilibrium position before coming to rest momentarily. Determine the coefficient of kinetic friction between the block and the rough surface between and . 58. A 2.00-kg block situated on a rough incline is connected to a spring of negligible mass having a spring constant of 100 N/m (Fig. P8.58). The pulley is frictionless. The block is released from rest when the spring is unstretched. The block moves 20.0 cm down the incline before coming to rest. Find the coefficient of kinetic friction between block and incline. 3.00 m 6.00 m Figure P8.57 Problems 247 k = 100 N/m 2.00 kg 37.0 left by the spring and continues to move in that direction beyond the spring's unstretched position. Finally, the mass comes to rest at a distance D to the left of the unstretched spring. Find (a) the distance of compression d, (b) the speed v of the mass at the unstretched position when the mass is moving to the left, and (c) the distance D between the unstretched spring and the point at which the mass comes to rest. Figure P8.58 Problems 58 and 59. k m 59. Review Problem. Suppose the incline is frictionless for the system described in Problem 58 (see Fig. P8.58). The block is released from rest with the spring initially unstretched. (a) How far does it move down the incline before coming to rest? (b) What is its acceleration at its lowest point? Is the acceleration constant? (c) Describe the energy transformations that occur during the descent. 60. The potential energy function for a system is given by U(x) x 3 2x 2 3x. (a) Determine the force Fx as a function of x. (b) For what values of x is the force equal to zero? (c) Plot U(x) versus x and Fx versus x, and indicate points of stable and unstable equilibrium. 61. A 20.0-kg block is connected to a 30.0-kg block by a string that passes over a frictionless pulley. The 30.0-kg block is connected to a spring that has negligible mass and a force constant of 250 N/m, as shown in Figure P8.61. The spring is unstretched when the system is as shown in the figure, and the incline is frictionless. The 20.0-kg block is pulled 20.0 cm down the incline (so that the 30.0-kg block is 40.0 cm above the floor) and is released from rest. Find the speed of each block when the 30.0-kg block is 20.0 cm above the floor (that is, when the spring is unstretched). vi d vf = 0 v v=0 D Figure P8.62 WEB 20.0 kg 30.0 kg 40.0 20.0 cm Figure P8.61 62. A 1.00-kg mass slides to the right on a surface having a coefficient of friction 0.250 (Fig. P8.62). The mass has a speed of vi 3.00 m/s when it makes contact with a light spring that has a spring constant k 50.0 N/m. The mass comes to rest after the spring has been compressed a distance d. The mass is then forced toward the 63. A block of mass 0.500 kg is pushed against a horizontal spring of negligible mass until the spring is compressed a distance x (Fig. P8.63). The spring constant is 450 N/m. When it is released, the block travels along a frictionless, horizontal surface to point B, at the bottom of a vertical circular track of radius R 1.00 m, and continues to move up the track. The speed of the block at the bottom of the track is vB 12.0 m/s, and the block experiences an average frictional force of 7.00 N while sliding up the track. (a) What is x? (b) What speed do you predict for the block at the top of the track? (c) Does the block actually reach the top of the track, or does it fall off before reaching the top? 64. A uniform chain of length 8.00 m initially lies stretched out on a horizontal table. (a) If the coefficient of static friction between the chain and the table is 0.600, show that the chain will begin to slide off the table if at least 3.00 m of it hangs over the edge of the table. (b) Determine the speed of the chain as all of it leaves the table, given that the coefficient of kinetic friction between the chain and the table is 0.400. 248 T CHAPTER 8 Potential Energy and Conservation of Energy 67. A ball having mass m is connected by a strong string of length L to a pivot point and held in place in a vertical position. A wind exerting constant force of magnitude F is blowing from left to right as in Figure P8.67a. (a) If the ball is released from rest, show that the maximum height H it reaches, as measured from its initial height, is vT R vB x m B H k 1 2L (mg/F )2 Figure P8.63 65. An object of mass m is suspended from a post on top of a cart by a string of length L as in Figure P8.65a. The cart and object are initially moving to the right at constant speed vi . The cart comes to rest after colliding and sticking to a bumper as in Figure P8.65b, and the suspended object swings through an angle . (a) Show that the speed is v i 2gL(1 cos ). (b) If L 1.20 m and 35.0, find the initial speed of the cart. (Hint: The force exerted by the string on the object does no work on the object.) Check that the above formula is valid both when 0 H L and when L H 2L. (Hint: First determine the potential energy associated with the constant wind force.) (b) Compute the value of H using the values m 2.00 kg, L 2.00 m, and F 14.7 N. (c) Using these same values, determine the equilibrium height of the ball. (d) Could the equilibrium height ever be greater than L? Explain. Pivot F L F Pivot L m m H vi (a) (b) Figure P8.67 L m (a) (b) Figure P8.65 66. A child slides without friction from a height h along a curved water slide (Fig. P8.66). She is launched from a height h/5 into the pool. Determine her maximum airborne height y in terms of h and . 68. A ball is tied to one end of a string. The other end of the string is fixed. The ball is set in motion around a vertical circle without friction. At the top of the circle, the ball has a speed of v i Rg, as shown in Figure P8.68. At what angle should the string be cut so that the ball will travel through the center of the circle? vi = The path after string is cut m R C Rg h h/5 y Figure P8.68 69. A ball at the end of a string whirls around in a vertical circle. If the ball's total energy remains constant, show that the tension in the string at the bottom is greater Figure P8.66 Problems than the tension at the top by a value six times the weight of the ball. 70. A pendulum comprising a string of length L and a sphere swings in the vertical plane. The string hits a peg located a distance d below the point of suspension (Fig. P8.70). (a) Show that if the sphere is released from a height below that of the peg, it will return to this height after striking the peg. (b) Show that if the pendulum is released from the horizontal position ( 90) and is to swing in a complete circle centered on the peg, then the minimum value of d must be 3L/5. 249 the other side? (Hint: First determine the potential energy associated with the wind force.) (b) Once the rescue is complete, Tarzan and Jane must swing back across the river. With what minimum speed must they begin their swing? Assume that Tarzan has a mass of 80.0 kg. 72. A child starts from rest and slides down the frictionless slide shown in Figure P8.72. In terms of R and H, at what height h will he lose contact with the section of radius R? L Peg d H R Figure P8.70 71. Jane, whose mass is 50.0 kg, needs to swing across a river (having width D) filled with man-eating crocodiles to save Tarzan from danger. However, she must swing into a wind exerting constant horizontal force F on a vine having length L and initially making an angle with the vertical (Fig. P8.71). Taking D 50.0 m, F 110 N, L 40.0 m, and 50.0, (a) with what minimum speed must Jane begin her swing to just make it to Figure P8.72 73. A 5.00-kg block free to move on a horizontal, frictionless surface is attached to one end of a light horizontal spring. The other end of the spring is fixed. The spring is compressed 0.100 m from equilibrium and is then released. The speed of the block is 1.20 m/s when it passes the equilibrium position of the spring. The same experiment is now repeated with the frictionless surface replaced by a surface for which k 0.300. Determine the speed of the block at the equilibrium position of the spring. 74. A 50.0-kg block and a 100-kg block are connected by a string as in Figure P8.74. The pulley is frictionless and of negligible mass. The coefficient of kinetic friction between the 50.0-kg block and the incline is k 0.250. Determine the change in the kinetic energy of the 50.0-kg block as it moves from to , a distance of 20.0 m. Wind F Tarzan L Jane 50.0 kg D 100 kg v 37.0 Figure P8.71 Figure P8.74 250 CHAPTER 8 Potential Energy and Conservation of Energy ANSWERS TO QUICK QUIZZES 8.1 Yes, because we are free to choose any point whatsoever as our origin of coordinates, which is the Ug 0 point. If the object is below the origin of coordinates that we choose, then Ug 0 for the object Earth system. 8.2 Yes, the total mechanical energy of the system is conserved because the only forces acting are conservative: the force of gravity and the spring force. There are two forms of potential energy: (1) gravitational potential energy and (2) elastic potential energy stored in the spring. 8.3 The first and third balls speed up after they are thrown, while the second ball initially slows down but then speeds up after reaching its peak. The paths of all three balls are parabolas, and the balls take different times to reach the ground because they have different initial velocities. However, all three balls have the same speed at the moment they hit the ground because all start with the same kinetic energy and undergo the same change in gravitational potential energy. In other words, E total 1mv 2 mgh is the same for all three balls at the 2 start of the motion. 8.4 Designate one object as No. 1 and the other as No. 2. The external force does work Wapp on the system. If Wapp 0, then the system energy increases. If Wapp 0, then the system energy decreases. The effect of friction is to decrease the total system energy. Equation 8.15 then becomes E W app K [K 1f [(Ug1f U K 2f ) Ug 2f (K 1i Usf) K 2i )] (Ug1i Ug 2i Usi)] E friction You may find it easier to think of this equation with its terms in a different order, saying total initial energy K 1i K 2i Ug1i net change Ug2i Usi K 1f K 2f total final energy W app f kd Ug1f Ug 2f Usf 8.5 The slope of a U(x)-versus-x graph is by definition dU(x)/dx. From Equation 8.16, we see that this expression is equal to the negative of the x component of the conservative force acting on an object that is part of the system. P U Z Z L E R Airbags have saved countless lives by reducing the forces exerted on vehicle occupants during collisions. How can airbags change the force needed to bring a person from a high speed to a complete stop? Why are they usually safer than seat belts alone? (Courtesy of Saab) c h a p t e r Linear Momentum and Collisions Chapter Outline 9.1 Linear Momentum and Its Conservation 9.2 Impulse and Momentum 9.3 Collisions 9.4 Elastic and Inelastic Collisions in One Dimension 9.5 9.6 9.7 9.8 Two-Dimensional Collisions The Center of Mass Motion of a System of Particles (Optional) Rocket Propulsion 251 252 CHAPTER 9 Linear Momentum and Collisions C onsider what happens when a golf ball is struck by a club. The ball is given a very large initial velocity as a result of the collision; consequently, it is able to travel more than 100 m through the air. The ball experiences a large acceleration. Furthermore, because the ball experiences this acceleration over a very short time interval, the average force exerted on it during the collision is very great. According to Newton's third law, the ball exerts on the club a reaction force that is equal in magnitude to and opposite in direction to the force exerted by the club on the ball. This reaction force causes the club to accelerate. Because the club is much more massive than the ball, however, the acceleration of the club is much less than the acceleration of the ball. One of the main objectives of this chapter is to enable you to understand and analyze such events. As a first step, we introduce the concept of momentum, which is useful for describing objects in motion and as an alternate and more general means of applying Newton's laws. For example, a very massive football player is often said to have a great deal of momentum as he runs down the field. A much less massive player, such as a halfback, can have equal or greater momentum if his speed is greater than that of the more massive player. This follows from the fact that momentum is defined as the product of mass and velocity. The concept of momentum leads us to a second conservation law, that of conservation of momentum. This law is especially useful for treating problems that involve collisions between objects and for analyzing rocket propulsion. The concept of the center of mass of a system of particles also is introduced, and we shall see that the motion of a system of particles can be described by the motion of one representative particle located at the center of mass. 9.1 LINEAR MOMENTUM AND ITS CONSERVATION In the preceding two chapters we studied situations too complex to analyze easily with Newton's laws. In fact, Newton himself used a form of his second law slightly different from F ma (Eq. 5.2) -- a form that is considerably easier to apply in complicated circumstances. Physicists use this form to study everything from subatomic particles to rocket propulsion. In studying situations such as these, it is often useful to know both something about the object and something about its motion. We start by defining a new term that incorporates this information: Definition of linear momentum of a particle The linear momentum of a particle of mass m moving with a velocity v is defined to be the product of the mass and velocity: p mv (9.1) 6.2 Linear momentum is a vector quantity because it equals the product of a scalar quantity m and a vector quantity v. Its direction is along v, it has dimensions ML/T, and its SI unit is kg m/s. If a particle is moving in an arbitrary direction, p must have three components, and Equation 9.1 is equivalent to the component equations px mvx py mvy pz mvz (9.2) As you can see from its definition, the concept of momentum provides a quantitative distinction between heavy and light particles moving at the same velocity. For example, the momentum of a bowling ball moving at 10 m/s is much greater than that of a tennis ball moving at the same speed. Newton called the product mv 9.1 Linear Momentum and Its Conservation 253 quantity of motion; this is perhaps a more graphic description than our present-day word momentum, which comes from the Latin word for movement. Quick Quiz 9.1 Two objects have equal kinetic energies. How do the magnitudes of their momenta compare? (a) p 1 p 2 , (b) p 1 p 2 , (c) p 1 p 2 , (d) not enough information to tell. Using Newton's second law of motion, we can relate the linear momentum of a particle to the resultant force acting on the particle: The time rate of change of the linear momentum of a particle is equal to the net force acting on the particle: F dp dt d(mv) dt (9.3) Newton's second law for a particle In addition to situations in which the velocity vector varies with time, we can use Equation 9.3 to study phenomena in which the mass changes. The real value of Equation 9.3 as a tool for analysis, however, stems from the fact that when the net force acting on a particle is zero, the time derivative of the momentum of the particle is zero, and therefore its linear momentum1 is constant. Of course, if the particle is isolated, then by necessity F 0 and p remains unchanged. This means that p is conserved. Just as the law of conservation of energy is useful in solving complex motion problems, the law of conservation of momentum can greatly simplify the analysis of other types of complicated motion. Conservation of Momentum for a Two-Particle System 6.2 Consider two particles 1 and 2 that can interact with each other but are isolated from their surroundings (Fig. 9.1). That is, the particles may exert a force on each other, but no external forces are present. It is important to note the impact of Newton's third law on this analysis. If an internal force from particle 1 (for example, a gravitational force) acts on particle 2, then there must be a second internal force -- equal in magnitude but opposite in direction -- that particle 2 exerts on particle 1. Suppose that at some instant, the momentum of particle 1 is p1 and that of particle 2 is p2 . Applying Newton's second law to each particle, we can write F21 dp1 dt and F12 d p2 dt p1 = m1v1 m1 F21 F12 m2 where F21 is the force exerted by particle 2 on particle 1 and F12 is the force exerted by particle 1 on particle 2. Newton's third law tells us that F12 and F21 are equal in magnitude and opposite in direction. That is, they form an action reaction pair F12 F21 . We can express this condition as F21 or as dp1 dt 1 In p2 = m 2v2 F12 0 dp2 dt d (p1 dt p2) 0 Figure 9.1 At some instant, the momentum of particle 1 is p1 m1v1 and the momentum of particle 2 is p2 m 2v2 . Note that F12 F21 . The total momentum of the system ptot is equal to the vector sum p1 p2 . this chapter, the terms momentum and linear momentum have the same meaning. Later, in Chapter 11, we shall use the term angular momentum when dealing with rotational motion. 254 CHAPTER 9 Linear Momentum and Collisions Because the time derivative of the total momentum ptot p1 p2 is zero, we conclude that the total momentum of the system must remain constant: ptot system p p1 p2 constant (9.4) or, equivalently, p1i p2i p1f p2f (9.5) where pli and p2i are the initial values and p1f and p2f the final values of the momentum during the time interval dt over which the reaction pair interacts. Equation 9.5 in component form demonstrates that the total momenta in the x, y, and z directions are all independently conserved: pix system system pf x system piy system pf y system piz system pf z (9.6) This result, known as the law of conservation of linear momentum, can be extended to any number of particles in an isolated system. It is considered one of the most important laws of mechanics. We can state it as follows: Whenever two or more particles in an isolated system interact, the total momentum of the system remains constant. This law tells us that the total momentum of an isolated system at all times equals its initial momentum. Notice that we have made no statement concerning the nature of the forces acting on the particles of the system. The only requirement is that the forces must be internal to the system. Conservation of momentum Quick Quiz 9.2 Your physical education teacher throws a baseball to you at a certain speed, and you catch it. The teacher is next going to throw you a medicine ball whose mass is ten times the mass of the baseball. You are given the following choices: You can have the medicine ball thrown with (a) the same speed as the baseball, (b) the same momentum, or (c) the same kinetic energy. Rank these choices from easiest to hardest to catch. EXAMPLE 9.1 The Floating Astronaut A SkyLab astronaut discovered that while concentrating on writing some notes, he had gradually floated to the middle of an open area in the spacecraft. Not wanting to wait until he floated to the opposite side, he asked his colleagues for a push. Laughing at his predicament, they decided not to help, and so he had to take off his uniform and throw it in one direction so that he would be propelled in the opposite direction. Estimate his resulting velocity. v1f v2f Solution We begin by making some reasonable guesses of relevant data. Let us assume we have a 70-kg astronaut who threw his 1-kg uniform at a speed of 20 m/s. For conve- Figure 9.2 somewhere. A hapless astronaut has discarded his uniform to get 9.2 nience, we set the positive direction of the x axis to be the direction of the throw (Fig. 9.2). Let us also assume that the x axis is tangent to the circular path of the spacecraft. We take the system to consist of the astronaut and the uniform. Because of the gravitational force (which keeps the astronaut, his uniform, and the entire spacecraft in orbit), the system is not really isolated. However, this force is directed perpendicular to the motion of the system. Therefore, momentum is constant in the x direction because there are no external forces in this direction. The total momentum of the system before the throw is zero (m1v1i m2v2i 0). Therefore, the total momentum after the throw must be zero; that is, m1v1f m2v2f 0 Impulse and Momentum 255 With m1 70 kg, v2f 20i m/s, and m2 1 kg, solving for v1f , we find the recoil velocity of the astronaut to be v1f m2 v m1 2f 1 kg (20i m/s) 70 kg 0.3i m/s The negative sign for v1f indicates that the astronaut is moving to the left after the throw, in the direction opposite the direction of motion of the uniform, in accordance with Newton's third law. Because the astronaut is much more massive than his uniform, his acceleration and consequent velocity are much smaller than the acceleration and velocity of the uniform. EXAMPLE 9.2 Breakup of a Kaon at Rest The important point behind this problem is that even though it deals with objects that are very different from those in the preceding example, the physics is identical: Linear momentum is conserved in an isolated system. Before decay (at rest) One type of nuclear particle, called the neutral kaon (K0 ), breaks up into a pair of other particles called pions ( and ) that are oppositely charged but equal in mass, as illustrated in Figure 9.3. Assuming the kaon is initially at rest, prove that the two pions must have momenta that are equal in magnitude and opposite in direction. Solution 0 The breakup of the kaon can be written K 0 9: If we let p be the momentum of the positive pion and p the momentum of the negative pion, the final momentum of the system consisting of the two pions can be written pf p p p After decay p+ + Because the kaon is at rest before the breakup, we know that pi 0. Because momentum is conserved, p i p f 0, so that p p 0, or p p Figure 9.3 A kaon at rest breaks up spontaneously into a pair of oppositely charged pions. The pions move apart with momenta that are equal in magnitude but opposite in direction. 9.2 6.3 & 6.4 IMPULSE AND MOMENTUM As we have seen, the momentum of a particle changes if a net force acts on the particle. Knowing the change in momentum caused by a force is useful in solving some types of problems. To begin building a better understanding of this important concept, let us assume that a single force F acts on a particle and that this force may vary with time. According to Newton's second law, F d p/dt, or dp integrate2 F dt (9.7) We can this expression to find the change in the momentum of a particle when the force acts over some time interval. If the momentum of the particle 2 Note that here we are integrating force with respect to time. Compare this with our efforts in Chapter 7, where we integrated force with respect to position to express the work done by the force. 256 CHAPTER 9 Linear Momentum and Collisions changes from pi at time ti to pf at time tf , integrating Equation 9.7 gives tf p pf pi F dt ti (9.8) To evaluate the integral, we need to know how the force varies with time. The quantity on the right side of this equation is called the impulse of the force F acting on a particle over the time interval t tf ti . Impulse is a vector defined by tf Impulse of a force I ti F dt p (9.9) Impulse momentum theorem The impulse of the force F acting on a particle equals the change in the momentum of the particle caused by that force. This statement, known as the impulse momentum theorem,3 is equivalent to Newton's second law. From this definition, we see that impulse is a vector quantity having a magnitude equal to the area under the force time curve, as described in Figure 9.4a. In this figure, it is assumed that the force varies in time in the general manner shown and is nonzero in the time interval t tf ti . The direction of the impulse vector is the same as the direction of the change in momentum. Impulse has the dimensions of momentum -- that is, ML/T. Note that impulse is not a property of a particle; rather, it is a measure of the degree to which an external force changes the momentum of the particle. Therefore, when we say that an impulse is given to a particle, we mean that momentum is transferred from an external agent to that particle. Because the force imparting an impulse can generally vary in time, it is convenient to define a time-averaged force F 1 t tf F ti (a) F tf t F F dt ti (9.10) Area = Ft ti (b) tf t where t tf ti . (This is an application of the mean value theorem of calculus.) Therefore, we can express Equation 9.9 as I F t (9.11) (a) A force acting on a particle may vary in time. The impulse imparted to the particle by the force is the area under the force versus time curve. (b) In the time interval t, the time-averaged force (horizontal dashed line) gives the same impulse to a particle as does the time-varying force described in part (a). Figure 9.4 This time-averaged force, described in Figure 9.4b, can be thought of as the constant force that would give to the particle in the time interval t the same impulse that the time-varying force gives over this same interval. In principle, if F is known as a function of time, the impulse can be calculated from Equation 9.9. The calculation becomes especially simple if the force acting on the particle is constant. In this case, F F and Equation 9.11 becomes I F t (9.12) In many physical situations, we shall use what is called the impulse approximation, in which we assume that one of the forces exerted on a particle acts for a short time but is much greater than any other force present. This approximation is especially useful in treating collisions in which the duration of the 3Although we assumed that only a single force acts on the particle, the impulse momentum theorem is valid when several forces act; in this case, we replace F in Equation 9.9 with F. 9.2 Impulse and Momentum 257 During the brief time the club is in contact with the ball, the ball gains momentum as a result of the collision, and the club loses the same amount of momentum. collision is very short. When this approximation is made, we refer to the force as an impulsive force. For example, when a baseball is struck with a bat, the time of the collision is about 0.01 s and the average force that the bat exerts on the ball in this time is typically several thousand newtons. Because this is much greater than the magnitude of the gravitational force, the impulse approximation justifies our ignoring the weight of the ball and bat. When we use this approximation, it is important to remember that pi and pf represent the momenta immediately before and after the collision, respectively. Therefore, in any situation in which it is proper to use the impulse approximation, the particle moves very little during the collision. QuickLab If you can find someone willing, play catch with an egg. What is the best way to move your hands so that the egg does not break when you change its momentum to zero? Quick Quiz 9.3 Two objects are at rest on a frictionless surface. Object 1 has a greater mass than object 2. When a force is applied to object 1, it accelerates through a distance d. The force is removed from object 1 and is applied to object 2. At the moment when object 2 has accelerated through the same distance d, which statements are true? (a) p 1 p 2 , (b) p 1 p 2 , (c) p 1 p 2 , (d) K1 K2 , (e) K1 K2 , (f) K1 K2 . EXAMPLE 9.3 Teeing Off the club loses contact with the ball as the ball starts on its trajectory, and to denote its landing. Neglecting air resistance, we can use Equation 4.14 for the range of a projectile: R xC v B2 sin 2 g A golf ball of mass 50 g is struck with a club (Fig. 9.5). The force exerted on the ball by the club varies from zero, at the instant before contact, up to some maximum value (at which the ball is deformed) and then back to zero when the ball leaves the club. Thus, the force time curve is qualitatively described by Figure 9.4. Assuming that the ball travels 200 m, estimate the magnitude of the impulse caused by the collision. Let us use to denote the moment when the club first contacts the ball, to denote the moment when B Solution Let us assume that the launch angle B is 45, the angle that provides the maximum range for any given launch velocity. This assumption gives sin 2 B 1, and the launch velocity of 258 the ball is vB CHAPTER 9 Linear Momentum and Collisions x C g (200 m)(9.80 m/s2) 44 m/s Considering the time interval for the collision, vi vA 0 and vf v B for the ball. Hence, the magnitude of the impulse imparted to the ball is I p mv B mvA (50 10 3 kg)(44 m/s) 0 2.2 kg m/s If the club is in contact with the ball for a time of 4.5 10 4 s, estimate the magnitude of the average force exerted by the club on the ball. Exercise Answer 4.9 103 N, a value that is extremely large when compared with the weight of the ball, 0.49 N. Figure 9.5 A golf ball being struck by a club. ( Harold E. Edgerton/ Courtesy of Palm Press, Inc.) EXAMPLE 9.4 How Good Are the Bumpers? The initial and final momenta of the automobile are pi pf m vi m vf (1 500 kg)( 15.0i m/s) (1 500 kg)(2.60 i m/s) 2.25 0.39 104 i kg m/s In a particular crash test, an automobile of mass 1 500 kg collides with a wall, as shown in Figure 9.6. The initial and final velocities of the automobile are vi 15.0i m/s and vf 2.60i m/s, respectively. If the collision lasts for 0.150 s, find the impulse caused by the collision and the average force exerted on the automobile. Let us assume that the force exerted on the car by the wall is large compared with other forces on the car so that we can apply the impulse approximation. Furthermore, we note that the force of gravity and the normal force exerted by the road on the car are perpendicular to the motion and therefore do not affect the horizontal momentum. 104i kg m/s Hence, the impulse is I p pf pi 0.39 104i kg m/s ( 2.25 I 2.64 104i kg m/s) Solution 104i kg m/s The average force exerted on the automobile is F Before p t 2.64 10 4 i kg m/s 0.150 s 1.76 105i N 15.0 m/s After 2.60 m/s (a) This car's momentum changes as a result of its collision with the wall. (b) In a crash test, much of the car's initial kinetic energy is transformed into energy used to damage the car. (a) Figure 9.6 (b) 9.3 Note that the magnitude of this force is large compared with the weight of the car (mg 1.47 104 N), which justifies our initial assumption. Of note in this problem is how the Collisions 259 signs of the velocities indicated the reversal of directions. What would the mathematics be describing if both the initial and final velocities had the same sign? Quick Quiz 9.4 Rank an automobile dashboard, seatbelt, and airbag in terms of (a) the impulse and (b) the average force they deliver to a front-seat passenger during a collision. 9.3 6.5 & 6.6 COLLISIONS F21 m1 m2 (a) F12 In this section we use the law of conservation of linear momentum to describe what happens when two particles collide. We use the term collision to represent the event of two particles' coming together for a short time and thereby producing impulsive forces on each other. These forces are assumed to be much greater than any external forces present. A collision may entail physical contact between two macroscopic objects, as described in Figure 9.7a, but the notion of what we mean by collision must be generalized because "physical contact" on a submicroscopic scale is ill-defined and hence meaningless. To understand this, consider a collision on an atomic scale (Fig. 9.7b), such as the collision of a proton with an alpha particle (the nucleus of a helium atom). Because the particles are both positively charged, they never come into physical contact with each other; instead, they repel each other because of the strong electrostatic force between them at close separations. When two particles 1 and 2 of masses m1 and m 2 collide as shown in Figure 9.7, the impulsive forces may vary in time in complicated ways, one of which is described in Figure 9.8. If F21 is the force exerted by particle 2 on particle 1, and if we assume that no external forces act on the particles, then the change in momentum of particle 1 due to the collision is given by Equation 9.8: tf p + ++ 4 He (b) Figure 9.7 (a) The collision between two objects as the result of direct contact. (b) The "collision" between two charged particles. p1 ti F21 dt Likewise, if F12 is the force exerted by particle 1 on particle 2, then the change in momentum of particle 2 is tf F p2 ti F12 dt F12 From Newton's third law, we conclude that p1 p1 p2 0 F21 p2 t Because the total momentum of the system is psystem p1 p2 , we conclude that the change in the momentum of the system due to the collision is zero: psystem p1 p2 constant This is precisely what we expect because no external forces are acting on the system (see Section 9.2). Because the impulsive forces are internal, they do not change the total momentum of the system (only external forces can do that). Figure 9.8 The impulse force as a function of time for the two colliding particles described in Figure F21. 9.7a. Note that F12 260 CHAPTER 9 Linear Momentum and Collisions Momentum is conserved for any collision Therefore, we conclude that the total momentum of an isolated system just before a collision equals the total momentum of the system just after the collision. EXAMPLE 9.5 Carry Collision Insurance! the entangled cars is pf (m1 m2)vf (2 700 kg)vf A car of mass 1800 kg stopped at a traffic light is struck from the rear by a 900-kg car, and the two become entangled. If the smaller car was moving at 20.0 m/s before the collision, what is the velocity of the entangled cars after the collision? Solution We can guess that the final speed is less than 20.0 m/s, the initial speed of the smaller car. The total momentum of the system (the two cars) before the collision must equal the total momentum immediately after the collision because momentum is conserved in any type of collision. The magnitude of the total momentum before the collision is equal to that of the smaller car because the larger car is initially at rest: pi m1v1i (900 kg)(20.0 m/s) 1.80 104 kg m/s After the collision, the magnitude of the momentum of Equating the momentum before to the momentum after and solving for vf , the final velocity of the entangled cars, we have vf pi m1 m2 1.80 104 kg m/s 2 700 kg 6.67 m/s The direction of the final velocity is the same as the velocity of the initially moving car. Exercise What would be the final speed if the two cars each had a mass of 900 kg? Answer 10.0 m/s. Quick Quiz 9.5 As a ball falls toward the Earth, the ball's momentum increases because its speed increases. Does this mean that momentum is not conserved in this situation? Quick Quiz 9.6 A skater is using very low-friction rollerblades. A friend throws a Frisbee straight at her. In which case does the Frisbee impart the greatest impulse to the skater: (a) she catches the Frisbee and holds it, (b) she catches it momentarily but drops it, (c) she catches it and at once throws it back to her friend? When the bowling ball and pin collide, part of the ball's momentum is transferred to the pin. Consequently, the pin acquires momentum and kinetic energy, and the ball loses momentum and kinetic energy. However, the total momentum of the system (ball and pin) remains constant. 9.4 ELASTIC AND INELASTIC COLLISIONS IN ONE DIMENSION Elastic collision As we have seen, momentum is conserved in any collision in which external forces are negligible. In contrast, kinetic energy may or may not be constant, depending on the type of collision. In fact, whether or not kinetic energy is the same before and after the collision is used to classify collisions as being either elastic or inelastic. An elastic collision between two objects is one in which total kinetic energy (as well as total momentum) is the same before and after the collision. Billiard-ball collisions and the collisions of air molecules with the walls of a container at ordinary temperatures are approximately elastic. Truly elastic collisions do occur, however, between atomic and subatomic particles. Collisions between certain objects in the macroscopic world, such as billiard-ball collisions, are only approximately elastic because some deformation and loss of kinetic energy take place. 9.4 Elastic and Inelastic Collisions in One Dimension 261 An inelastic collision is one in which total kinetic energy is not the same before and after the collision (even though momentum is constant). Inelastic collisions are of two types. When the colliding objects stick together after the collision, as happens when a meteorite collides with the Earth, the collision is called perfectly inelastic. When the colliding objects do not stick together, but some kinetic energy is lost, as in the case of a rubber ball colliding with a hard surface, the collision is called inelastic (with no modifying adverb). For example, when a rubber ball collides with a hard surface, the collision is inelastic because some of the kinetic energy of the ball is lost when the ball is deformed while it is in contact with the surface. In most collisions, kinetic energy is not the same before and after the collision because some of it is converted to internal energy, to elastic potential energy when the objects are deformed, and to rotational energy. Elastic and perfectly inelastic collisions are limiting cases; most collisions fall somewhere between them. In the remainder of this section, we treat collisions in one dimension and consider the two extreme cases -- perfectly inelastic and elastic collisions. The important distinction between these two types of collisions is that momentum is constant in all collisions, but kinetic energy is constant only in elastic collisions. Inelastic collision QuickLab Hold a Ping-Pong ball or tennis ball on top of a basketball. Drop them both at the same time so that the basketball hits the floor, bounces up, and hits the smaller falling ball. What happens and why? Perfectly Inelastic Collisions Consider two particles of masses m1 and m 2 moving with initial velocities v1i and v2i along a straight line, as shown in Figure 9.9. The two particles collide head-on, stick together, and then move with some common velocity vf after the collision. Because momentum is conserved in any collision, we can say that the total momentum before the collision equals the total momentum of the composite system after the collision: m1v1i m2v2i vf (m1 m1v1i m1 m2)vf m2v2i m2 (9.13) (9.14) m1 Before collision m2 v1i (a) v2i Quick Quiz 9.7 Which is worse, crashing into a brick wall at 40 mi/h or crashing head-on into an oncoming car that is identical to yours and also moving at 40 mi/h? After collision vf m1 + m2 (b) Elastic Collisions 6.6 Now consider two particles that undergo an elastic head-on collision (Fig. 9.10). In this case, both momentum and kinetic energy are conserved; therefore, we have m1v1i 1 2 2 m1v1i Figure 9.9 Schematic representation of a perfectly inelastic head-on collision between two particles: (a) before collision and (b) after collision. m2v2i 1 2 2 m2v2i m1v1f 1 2 2 m1v1f m2v2f 1 2 2 m2v2f (9.15) (9.16) Because all velocities in Figure 9.10 are either to the left or the right, they can be represented by the corresponding speeds along with algebraic signs indicating direction. We shall indicate v as positive if a particle moves to the right and negative 262 Before collision m1 v1i (a) v2i m2 CHAPTER 9 Linear Momentum and Collisions After collision v1f (b) v2f if it moves to the left. As has been seen in earlier chapters, it is common practice to call these values "speed" even though this term technically refers to the magnitude of the velocity vector, which does not have an algebraic sign. In a typical problem involving elastic collisions, there are two unknown quantities, and Equations 9.15 and 9.16 can be solved simultaneously to find these. An alternative approach, however -- one that involves a little mathematical manipulation of Equation 9.16 -- often simplifies this process. To see how, let us cancel the factor 1 in Equation 9.16 and rewrite it as 2 m1(v1i2 and then factor both sides: m1(v1i v1f )(v1i v1f ) m2(v2f v2i )(v2f v2i ) (9.17) v1f 2 ) m2(v2f 2 v2i2 ) Schematic representation of an elastic head-on collision between two particles: (a) before collision and (b) after collision. Figure 9.10 Next, let us separate the terms containing m1 and m 2 in Equation 9.15 to get m1(v1i v1f ) m2(v2f v2i ) (9.18) To obtain our final result, we divide Equation 9.17 by Equation 9.18 and get v1i v1i v1f v2i v2f (v1f v2i v2f ) (9.19) This equation, in combination with Equation 9.15, can be used to solve problems dealing with elastic collisions. According to Equation 9.19, the relative speed of the two particles before the collision v1i v2i equals the negative of their relative speed after the collision, (v1f v2f ). Suppose that the masses and initial velocities of both particles are known. Equations 9.15 and 9.19 can be solved for the final speeds in terms of the initial speeds because there are two equations and two unknowns: v1f Elastic collision: relationships between final and initial velocities m1 m1 m2 v m2 1i 2m2 v m1 m2 2i m2 m1 m1 v m2 2i (9.20) (9.21) v2f 2m1 v m1 m2 1i It is important to remember that the appropriate signs for v1i and v2i must be included in Equations 9.20 and 9.21. For example, if particle 2 is moving to the left initially, then v2i is negative. Let us consider some special cases: If m1 m 2 , then v1f v2i and v2f v1i . That is, the particles exchange speeds if they have equal masses. This is approximately what one observes in head-on billiard ball collisions -- the cue ball stops, and the struck ball moves away from the collision with the same speed that the cue ball had. If particle 2 is initially at rest, then v2i 0 and Equations 9.20 and 9.21 become Elastic collision: particle 2 initially at rest v1f v2f m1 m1 m2 v m2 1i (9.22) (9.23) 2m1 v m1 m2 1i If m1 is much greater than m 2 and v2i 0 , we see from Equations 9.22 and 9.23 that v1f v1i and v2f 2v1i . That is, when a very heavy particle collides headon with a very light one that is initially at rest, the heavy particle continues its mo- 9.4 Elastic and Inelastic Collisions in One Dimension 263 tion unaltered after the collision, and the light particle rebounds with a speed equal to about twice the initial speed of the heavy particle. An example of such a collision would be that of a moving heavy atom, such as uranium, with a light atom, such as hydrogen. If m 2 is much greater than m1 and particle 2 is initially at rest, then v1f v1i and v2f v2i 0. That is, when a very light particle collides head-on with a very heavy particle that is initially at rest, the light particle has its velocity reversed and the heavy one remains approximately at rest. EXAMPLE 9.6 The Ballistic Pendulum The ballistic pendulum (Fig. 9.11) is a system used to measure the speed of a fast-moving projectile, such as a bullet. The bullet is fired into a large block of wood suspended from some light wires. The bullet embeds in the block, and the entire system swings through a height h. The collision is perfectly inelastic, and because momentum is conserved, Equation 9.14 gives the speed of the system right after the collision, when we assume the impulse approximation. If we call the bullet particle 1 and the block particle 2, the total kinetic energy right after the collision is (1) With v2i Kf 1 2 (m1 Exercise In a ballistic pendulum experiment, suppose that h 5.00 cm, m1 5.00 g, and m 2 1.00 kg. Find (a) the initial speed of the bullet and (b) the loss in mechanical energy due to the collision. Answer 199 m/s; 98.5 J. m2)vf 2 0, Equation 9.14 becomes (2) vf m1v1i m1 m2 m1 + m 2 m1 v1i m2 (a) Substituting this value of vf into (1) gives Kf m12v1i2 2(m1 m2) vf h Note that this kinetic energy immediately after the collision is less than the initial kinetic energy of the bullet. In all the energy changes that take place after the collision, however, the total amount of mechanical energy remains constant; thus, we can say that after the collision, the kinetic energy of the block and bullet at the bottom is transformed to potential energy at the height h: m12v1i2 2(m1 m2) Solving for v1i , we obtain v1i m1 m1 m2 (m1 m2)gh 2gh (b) This expression tells us that it is possible to obtain the initial speed of the bullet by measuring h and the two masses. Because the collision is perfectly inelastic, some mechanical energy is converted to internal energy and it would be incorrect to equate the initial kinetic energy of the incoming bullet to the final gravitational potential energy of the bullet block combination. Figure 9.11 (a) Diagram of a ballistic pendulum. Note that v1i is the velocity of the bullet just before the collision and vf v1f v2f is the velocity of the bullet block system just after the perfectly inelastic collision. (b) Multiflash photograph of a ballistic pendulum used in the laboratory. 264 CHAPTER 9 Linear Momentum and Collisions EXAMPLE 9.7 A Two-Body Collision with a Spring A block of mass m 1 1.60 kg initially moving to the right with a speed of 4.00 m/s on a frictionless horizontal track collides with a spring attached to a second block of mass m 2 2.10 kg initially moving to the left with a speed of 2.50 m/s, as shown in Figure 9.12a. The spring constant is 600 N/m. (a) At the instant block 1 is moving to the right with a speed of 3.00 m/s, as in Figure 9.12b, determine the velocity of block 2. First, note that the initial velocity of block 2 is 2.50 m/s because its direction is to the left. Because momentum is conserved for the system of two blocks, we have m1v1i m2v2i m1v1f m2v2f (2.10 kg)( 2.50 m/s) (2.10 kg)v2f Solution To determine the distance that the spring is compressed, shown as x in Figure 9.12b, we can use the concept of conservation of mechanical energy because no friction or other nonconservative forces are acting on the system. Thus, we have 1 2 2 m1v1i 1 2 2 m2 v2i 1 2 2 m1v1f 1 2 2 m2 v2f 1 2 2 kx Solution Substituting the given values and the result to part (a) into this expression gives x 0.173 m (1.60 kg)(4.00 m/s) (1.60 kg)(3.00 m/s) v2f 1.74 m/s It is important to note that we needed to use the principles of both conservation of momentum and conservation of mechanical energy to solve the two parts of this problem. Exercise The negative value for v2f means that block 2 is still moving to the left at the instant we are considering. (b) Determine the distance the spring is compressed at that instant. v1i = (4.00i) m/s v2i = (2.50i) m/s Find the velocity of block 1 and the compression in the spring at the instant that block 2 is at rest. Answer 0.719 m/s to the right; 0.251 m. v1f = (3.00i) m/s v2f k m1 m2 k m1 m2 x (a) (b) Figure 9.12 EXAMPLE 9.8 Slowing Down Neutrons by Collisions In a nuclear reactor, neutrons are produced when a 235U 92 atom splits in a process called fission. These neutrons are moving at about 107 m/s and must be slowed down to about 103 m/s before they take part in another fission event. They are slowed down by being passed through a solid or liquid material called a moderator. The slowing-down process involves elastic collisions. Let us show that a neutron can lose most of its kinetic energy if it collides elastically with a moderator containing light nuclei, such as deuterium (in "heavy water," D2O) or carbon (in graphite). Solution Let us assume that the moderator nucleus of mass mm is at rest initially and that a neutron of mass mn and initial speed vni collides with it head-on. Because these are elastic collisions, the first thing we do is recognize that both momentum and kinetic energy are constant. Therefore, Equations 9.22 and 9.23 can be applied to the head-on collision of a neutron with a moderator nucleus. We can represent this process by a drawing such as Figure 9.10. The initial kinetic energy of the neutron is 9.4 1 2 2 mnvni Elastic and Inelastic Collisions in One Dimension 2mn2mm v 2 (mn mm)2 ni 265 Kni After the collision, the neutron has kinetic energy 1 mnvnf 2, 2 and we can substitute into this the value for vnf given by Equation 9.22: Knf 1 2 2 mnvnf Kmf 1 2 2 mmvmf Hence, the fraction fm of the initial kinetic energy transferred to the moderator nucleus is (2) fm Kmf Kni 4mnmm (mn mm)2 mn 2 mn mn mm mm 2 vni2 Therefore, the fraction fn of the initial kinetic energy possessed by the neutron after the collision is (1) fn Knf Kni mn mn mm mm 2 From this result, we see that the final kinetic energy of the neutron is small when mm is close to mn and zero when mn mm . We can use Equation 9.23, which gives the final speed of the particle that was initially at rest, to calculate the kinetic energy of the moderator nucleus after the collision: Because the total kinetic energy of the system is conserved, (2) can also be obtained from (1) with the condition that fn fm 1, so that fm 1 fn . Suppose that heavy water is used for the moderator. For collisions of the neutrons with deuterium nuclei in D2O (mm 2mn), fn 1/9 and fm 8/9. That is, 89% of the neutron's kinetic energy is transferred to the deuterium nucleus. In practice, the moderator efficiency is reduced because head-on collisions are very unlikely. How do the results differ when graphite (12C, as found in pencil lead) is used as the moderator? Quick Quiz 9.8 An ingenious device that illustrates conservation of momentum and kinetic energy is shown in Figure 9.13a. It consists of five identical hard balls supported by strings of equal lengths. When ball 1 is pulled out and released, after the almost-elastic collision between it and ball 2, ball 5 moves out, as shown in Figure 9.13b. If balls 1 and 2 are pulled out and released, balls 4 and 5 swing out, and so forth. Is it ever possible that, when ball 1 is released, balls 4 and 5 will swing out on the opposite side and travel with half the speed of ball 1, as in Figure 9.13c? 1 v 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 This can happen. (b) v 5 (a) v 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 Can this happen? (c) 4 v/2 5 Figure 9.13 An executive stress reliever. 266 CHAPTER 9 Linear Momentum and Collisions 9.5 TWO-DIMENSIONAL COLLISIONS In Sections 9.1 and 9.3, we showed that the momentum of a system of two particles is constant when the system is isolated. For any collision of two particles, this result implies that the momentum in each of the directions x, y, and z is constant. However, an important subset of collisions takes place in a plane. The game of billiards is a familiar example involving multiple collisions of objects moving on a twodimensional surface. For such two-dimensional collisions, we obtain two component equations for conservation of momentum: m1v1ix m1v1iy m2v2ix m2v2iy m1v1fx m1v1fy m2v2 fx m2v2fy Let us consider a two-dimensional problem in which particle 1 of mass m1 collides with particle 2 of mass m 2 , where particle 2 is initially at rest, as shown in Figure 9.14. After the collision, particle 1 moves at an angle with respect to the horizontal and particle 2 moves at an angle with respect to the horizontal. This is called a glancing collision. Applying the law of conservation of momentum in component form, and noting that the initial y component of the momentum of the two-particle system is zero, we obtain m1v1i 0 m1v1f cos m1v1f sin m2v2f cos m2v2f sin (9.24) (9.25) where the minus sign in Equation 9.25 comes from the fact that after the collision, particle 2 has a y component of velocity that is downward. We now have two independent equations. As long as no more than two of the seven quantities in Equations 9.24 and 9.25 are unknown, we can solve the problem. If the collision is elastic, we can also use Equation 9.16 (conservation of kinetic energy), with v2i 0, to give 1 2 2 m1v1i 1 2 2 m1v1f 1 2 2 m2v2f (9.26) Knowing the initial speed of particle 1 and both masses, we are left with four unknowns (v1f , v2f , , ). Because we have only three equations, one of the four remaining quantities must be given if we are to determine the motion after the collision from conservation principles alone. If the collision is inelastic, kinetic energy is not conserved and Equation 9.26 does not apply. v1f v1f sin v1f cos v2f cos v2f v1i v2f sin (a) Before the collision (b) After the collision Figure 9.14 An elastic glancing collision between two particles. 9.5 Two-Dimensional Collisions 267 Problem-Solving Hints Collisions The following procedure is recommended when dealing with problems involving collisions between two objects: Set up a coordinate system and define your velocities with respect to that system. It is usually convenient to have the x axis coincide with one of the initial velocities. In your sketch of the coordinate system, draw and label all velocity vectors and include all the given information. Write expressions for the x and y components of the momentum of each object before and after the collision. Remember to include the appropriate signs for the components of the velocity vectors. Write expressions for the total momentum in the x direction before and after the collision and equate the two. Repeat this procedure for the total momentum in the y direction. These steps follow from the fact that, because the momentum of the system is conserved in any collision, the total momentum along any direction must also be constant. Remember, it is the momentum of the system that is constant, not the momenta of the individual objects. If the collision is inelastic, kinetic energy is not conserved, and additional information is probably required. If the collision is perfectly inelastic, the final velocities of the two objects are equal. Solve the momentum equations for the unknown quantities. If the collision is elastic, kinetic energy is conserved, and you can equate the total kinetic energy before the collision to the total kinetic energy after the collision to get an additional relationship between the velocities. EXAMPLE 9.9 Collision at an Intersection A 1 500-kg car traveling east with a speed of 25.0 m/s collides at an intersection with a 2 500-kg van traveling north at a speed of 20.0 m/s, as shown in Figure 9.15. Find the direction and magnitude of the velocity of the wreckage after the collision, assuming that the vehicles undergo a perfectly inelastic collision (that is, they stick together). y vf (25.0i) m/s Solution Let us choose east to be along the positive x direction and north to be along the positive y direction. Before the collision, the only object having momentum in the x direction is the car. Thus, the magnitude of the total initial momentum of the system (car plus van) in the x direction is pxi (1 500 kg)(25.0 m/s) 3.75 104 kg m/s Let us assume that the wreckage moves at an angle and speed vf after the collision. The magnitude of the total momentum in the x direction after the collision is pxf (4 000 kg)vf cos x (20.0j) m/s Figure 9.15 An eastbound car colliding with a northbound van. Because the total momentum in the x direction is constant, we can equate these two equations to obtain (1) 3.75 104 kg m/s (4 000 kg)vf cos Similarly, the total initial momentum of the system in the y direction is that of the van, and the magnitude of this momentum is (2 500 kg)(20.0 m/s). Applying conservation of 268 CHAPTER 9 Linear Momentum and Collisions momentum to the y direction, we have pyi (2 500 kg)(20.0 m/s) (2) 5.00 104 kg m/s pyf (4 000 kg)vf sin (4 000 kg)vf sin 53.1 When this angle is substituted into (2), the value of vf is vf 5.00 104 kg m/s (4 000 kg)sin 53.1 15.6 m/s If we divide (2) by (1), we get sin cos tan 5.00 3.75 104 104 1.33 It might be instructive for you to draw the momentum vectors of each vehicle before the collision and the two vehicles together after the collision. EXAMPLE 9.10 Proton Proton Collision Solving these three equations with three unknowns simultaneously gives v1f v2f 2.80 2.11 53.0 90. This result is not accidental. WhenNote that ever two equal masses collide elastically in a glancing collision and one of them is initially at rest, their final velocities are always at right angles to each other. The next example illustrates this point in more detail. 105 m/s 105 m/s Proton 1 collides elastically with proton 2 that is initially at rest. Proton 1 has an initial speed of 3.50 105 m/s and makes a glancing collision with proton 2, as was shown in Figure 9.14. After the collision, proton 1 moves at an angle of 37.0 to the horizontal axis, and proton 2 deflects at an angle to the same axis. Find the final speeds of the two protons and the angle . Solution Because both particles are protons, we know that m1 m 2 . We also know that 37.0 and v1i 3.50 105 m/s. Equations 9.24, 9.25, and 9.26 become v1f cos 37.0 v1f sin 37.0 v2f cos v2f sin v1f 2 3.50 0 2 105 m/s v2f (3.50 105 m/s)2 EXAMPLE 9.11 Billiard Ball Collision In a game of billiards, a player wishes to sink a target ball 2 in the corner pocket, as shown in Figure 9.16. If the angle to the corner pocket is 35, at what angle is the cue ball 1 deflected? Assume that friction and rotational motion are unimportant and that the collision is elastic. Solution Because the target ball is initially at rest, conservation of energy (Eq. 9.16) gives 1 2 2 m1v1i 1 2 2 m1v1f 1 2 2 m2v2f y v2f But m1 m 2 , so that (1) v1i 2 v1i 35 v1f 2 v2f 2 Cue ball v1f x Applying conservation of momentum to the two-dimensional collision gives (2) v1i v1f v2f Note that because m 1 m 2 , the masses also cancel in (2). If we square both sides of (2) and use the definition of the dot Figure 9.16 9.6 product of two vectors from Section 7.2, we get v1i2 (v1f v2f ) (v1f v2f ) v1f 2 v2f 2 2v1f v2f 35, 35) The Center of Mass 269 0 35 cos( 90 35) or 55 Because the angle between v1f and v2f is 35), and so v1f v2f v1f v2f cos( (3) v1i2 v1f 2 v2f 2 2v1f v2f cos( Subtracting (1) from (3) gives 0 2v1f v2f cos( 35) This result shows that whenever two equal masses undergo a glancing elastic collision and one of them is initially at rest, they move at right angles to each other after the collision. The same physics describes two very different situations, protons in Example 9.10 and billiard balls in this example. 9.6 6.7 THE CENTER OF MASS In this section we describe the overall motion of a mechanical system in terms of a special point called the center of mass of the system. The mechanical system can be either a system of particles, such as a collection of atoms in a container, or an extended object, such as a gymnast leaping through the air. We shall see that the center of mass of the system moves as if all the mass of the system were concentrated at that point. Furthermore, if the resultant external force on the system is Fext and the total mass of the system is M, the center of mass moves with an acceleration given by a Fext /M. That is, the system moves as if the resultant external force were applied to a single particle of mass M located at the center of mass. This behavior is independent of other motion, such as rotation or vibration of the system. This result was implicitly assumed in earlier chapters because many examples referred to the motion of extended objects that were treated as particles. Consider a mechanical system consisting of a pair of particles that have different masses and are connected by a light, rigid rod (Fig. 9.17). One can describe the position of the center of mass of a system as being the average position of the system's mass. The center of mass of the system is located somewhere on the line joining the CM (a) CM (b) CM (c) Figure 9.17 Two particles of unequal mass are connected by a light, rigid rod. (a) The system rotates clockwise when a force is applied between the less massive particle and the center of mass. (b) The system rotates counterclockwise when a force is applied between the more massive particle and the center of mass. (c) The system moves in the direction of the force without rotating when a force is applied at the center of mass. This multiflash photograph shows that as the acrobat executes a somersault, his center of mass follows a parabolic path, the same path that a particle would follow. 270 y x CM m1 x1 x2 CM m2 x CHAPTER 9 Linear Momentum and Collisions Figure 9.18 The center of mass of two particles of unequal mass on the x axis is located at x CM , a point between the particles, closer to the one having the larger mass. particles and is closer to the particle having the larger mass. If a single force is applied at some point on the rod somewhere between the center of mass and the less massive particle, the system rotates clockwise (see Fig. 9.17a). If the force is applied at a point on the rod somewhere between the center of mass and the more massive particle, the system rotates counterclockwise (see Fig. 9.17b). If the force is applied at the center of mass, the system moves in the direction of F without rotating (see Fig. 9.17c). Thus, the center of mass can be easily located. The center of mass of the pair of particles described in Figure 9.18 is located on the x axis and lies somewhere between the particles. Its x coordinate is xCM m1x1 m1 m2 x2 m2 (9.27) For example, if x1 0, x2 d, and m2 2m1 , we find that xCM 2 d. That is, the 3 center of mass lies closer to the more massive particle. If the two masses are equal, the center of mass lies midway between the particles. We can extend this concept to a system of many particles in three dimensions. The x coordinate of the center of mass of n particles is defined to be xCM m1x1 m2 x2 m1 m2 m3x3 m3 mn xn mn i mi xi i mi (9.28) where xi is the x coordinate of the ith particle. For convenience, we express the total mass as M mi , where the sum runs over all n particles. The y and z coordii nates of the center of mass are similarly defined by the equations yCM i mi yi M and zCM i mi zi M (9.29) The center of mass can also be located by its position vector, rCM . The cartesian coordinates of this vector are x CM , y CM , and z C M , defined in Equations 9.28 and 9.29. Therefore, rCM xCMi yCM j zCMk mi xi i mi yi j mi zi k i i i M Vector position of the center of mass for a system of particles rCM i mi ri M (9.30) where ri is the position vector of the ith particle, defined by y mi CM ri rCM x ri xi i yi j zi k z Although locating the center of mass for an extended object is somewhat more cumbersome than locating the center of mass of a system of particles, the basic ideas we have discussed still apply. We can think of an extended object as a system containing a large number of particles (Fig. 9.19). The particle separation is very small, and so the object can be considered to have a continuous mass distribution. By dividing the object into elements of mass mi , with coordinates xi , yi , zi , we see that the x coordinate of the center of mass is approximately xCM i Figure 9.19 An extended object can be considered a distribution of small elements of mass mi . The center of mass is located at the vector position rCM , which has coordinates x CM , y CM , and z CM . xi mi M with similar expressions for y CM and z CM . If we let the number of elements n approach infinity, then x CM is given precisely. In this limit, we replace the sum by an 9.6 The Center of Mass 271 integral and mi by the differential element dm: xCM lim i xi mi M mi :0 1 M x dm (9.31) Likewise, for y CM and z CM we obtain yCM 1 M y dm and zCM 1 M C z dm (9.32) A We can express the vector position of the center of mass of an extended object in the form rCM 1 M r dm (9.33) B C which is equivalent to the three expressions given by Equations 9.31 and 9.32. The center of mass of any symmetric object lies on an axis of symmetry and on any plane of symmetry.4 For example, the center of mass of a rod lies in the rod, midway between its ends. The center of mass of a sphere or a cube lies at its geometric center. One can determine the center of mass of an irregularly shaped object by suspending the object first from one point and then from another. In Figure 9.20, a wrench is hung from point A, and a vertical line AB (which can be established with a plumb bob) is drawn when the wrench has stopped swinging. The wrench is then hung from point C, and a second vertical line CD is drawn. The center of mass is halfway through the thickness of the wrench, under the intersection of these two lines. In general, if the wrench is hung freely from any point, the vertical line through this point must pass through the center of mass. Because an extended object is a continuous distribution of mass, each small mass element is acted upon by the force of gravity. The net effect of all these forces is equivalent to the effect of a single force, Mg, acting through a special point, called the center of gravity. If g is constant over the mass distribution, then the center of gravity coincides with the center of mass. If an extended object is pivoted at its center of gravity, it balances in any orientation. A Center of mass D B Figure 9.20 An experimental technique for determining the center of mass of a wrench. The wrench is hung freely first from point A and then from point C. The intersection of the two lines AB and CD locates the center of mass. Quick Quiz 9.9 If a baseball bat is cut at the location of its center of mass as shown in Figure 9.21, do the two pieces have the same mass? QuickLab Cut a triangle from a piece of cardboard and draw a set of adjacent strips inside it, parallel to one of the sides. Put a dot at the approximate location of the center of mass of each strip and then draw a straight line through the dots and into the angle opposite your starting side. The center of mass for the triangle must lie on this bisector of the angle. Repeat these steps for the other two sides. The three angle bisectors you have drawn will intersect at the center of mass of the triangle. If you poke a hole anywhere in the triangle and hang the cardboard from a string attached at that hole, the center of mass will be vertically aligned with the hole. Figure 9.21 A baseball bat cut at the location of its center of mass. 4This statement is valid only for objects that have a uniform mass per unit volume. 272 CHAPTER 9 Linear Momentum and Collisions EXAMPLE 9.12 The Center of Mass of Three Particles A system consists of three particles located as shown in Figure 9.22a. Find the center of mass of the system. y(m) 3 Solution We set up the problem by labeling the masses of the particles as shown in the figure, with m1 m2 1.0 kg and m3 2.0 kg. Using the basic defining equations for the coordinates of the center of mass and noting that zCM 0, we obtain xCM m1x1 m2x2 m3x3 i M m1 m2 m3 (1.0 kg)(1.0 m) (1.0 kg)(2.0 m) (2.0 kg)(0 m) 1.0 kg 1.0 kg 2.0 kg 3.0 kg m 0.75 m 4.0 kg miyi my my my i 1 1 2 2 3 3 2 mixi m3 1 rCM yCM m1 0 1 (a) m2 2 3 x(m) M m1 m2 m3 (1.0 kg)(0) (1.0 kg)(0) (2.0 kg)(2.0 m) 4.0 kg 4.0 kg m 1.0 m 4.0 kg The position vector to the center of mass measured from the origin is therefore rCM xCM i yCM j 0.75i m 1.0 j m MrCM m3r3 rCM We can verify this result graphically by adding together m1r1 m2r2 m3r3 and dividing the vector sum by M, the total mass. This is shown in Figure 9.22b. Figure 9.22 (a) Two 1-kg masses and a single 2-kg mass are located as shown. The vector indicates the location of the system's center of mass. (b) The vector sum of m i ri . m1r1 m2r2 (b) EXAMPLE 9.13 The Center of Mass of a Rod Because M/L, this reduces to xCM L2 2M M L L 2 (a) Show that the center of mass of a rod of mass M and length L lies midway between its ends, assuming the rod has a uniform mass per unit length. Solution The rod is shown aligned along the x axis in Figure 9.23, so that yCM zCM 0. Furthermore, if we call the mass per unit length (this quantity is called the linear mass density), then M/L for the uniform rod we assume here. If we divide the rod into elements of length dx, then the mass of each element is dm dx. For an arbitrary element located a distance x from the origin, Equation 9.31 gives xCM 1 M x dm 1 M L One can also use symmetry arguments to obtain the same result. (b) Suppose a rod is nonuniform such that its mass per unit length varies linearly with x according to the expression x, where is a constant. Find the x coordinate of the center of mass as a fraction of L. x dx 0 x2 M 2 L 0 L2 2M Solution In this case, we replace dm by dx where constant. Therefore, x CM is is not 9.7 L L Motion of a System of Particles 273 xCM 1 M M 0 x dm L 1 M x dx 0 L3 1 M x x dx 0 x2 dx 3M y dm = dx L O x dx x We can eliminate by noting that the total mass of the rod is related to through the relationship L L M dm 0 dx 0 x dx L2 2 Substituting this into the expression for x CM gives xCM L3 3 L2/2 2 L 3 Figure 9.23 cated at x CM The center of mass of a uniform rod of length L is loL/2. EXAMPLE 9.14 The Center of Mass of a Right Triangle With this substitution, x CM becomes xCM 2 ab a a An object of mass M is in the shape of a right triangle whose dimensions are shown in Figure 9.24. Locate the coordinates of the center of mass, assuming the object has a uniform mass per unit area. By inspection we can estimate that the x coordinate of the center of mass must be past the center of the base, that is, greater than a/2, because the largest part of the triangle lies beyond that point. A similar argument indicates that its y coordinate must be less than b/2. To evaluate the x coordinate, we divide the triangle into narrow strips of width dx and height y as in Figure 9.24. The mass dm of each strip is dm total mass of object total area of object M (y dx) 1/2ab area of strip x 0 b x dx a 2 a2 x2 dx 0 2 a2 x3 3 a 0 Solution 2 a 3 By a similar calculation, we get for the y coordinate of the center of mass yCM 1 b 3 These values fit our original estimates. 2M y dx ab y dm Therefore, the x coordinate of the center of mass is xCM 1 M x dm 1 M a x 0 2M y dx ab 2 ab a c xy dx 0 b y dx x To evaluate this integral, we must express y in terms of x. From similar triangles in Figure 9.24, we see that y x b a or y b x a O x a Figure 9.24 9.7 6.8 MOTION OF A SYSTEM OF PARTICLES We can begin to understand the physical significance and utility of the center of mass concept by taking the time derivative of the position vector given by Equation 9.30. From Section 4.1 we know that the time derivative of a position vector is by 274 CHAPTER 9 Linear Momentum and Collisions Velocity of the center of mass definition a velocity. Assuming M remains constant for a system of particles, that is, no particles enter or leave the system, we get the following expression for the velocity of the center of mass of the system: mivi drCM 1 dr i (9.34) vCM mi i dt M i dt M where vi is the velocity of the ith particle. Rearranging Equation 9.34 gives Total momentum of a system of particles MvCM i mi vi i pi ptot (9.35) Therefore, we conclude that the total linear momentum of the system equals the total mass multiplied by the velocity of the center of mass. In other words, the total linear momentum of the system is equal to that of a single particle of mass M moving with a velocity vCM . If we now differentiate Equation 9.34 with respect to time, we get the acceleration of the center of mass of the system: Acceleration of the center of mass aCM d vCM dt 1 M mi i dvi dt 1 M mi a i i (9.36) Rearranging this expression and using Newton's second law, we obtain MaCM i mi a i i Fi (9.37) where Fi is the net force on particle i. The forces on any particle in the system may include both external forces (from outside the system) and internal forces (from within the system). However, by Newton's third law, the internal force exerted by particle 1 on particle 2, for example, is equal in magnitude and opposite in direction to the internal force exerted by particle 2 on particle 1. Thus, when we sum over all internal forces in Equation 9.37, they cancel in pairs and the net force on the system is caused only by external forces. Thus, we can write Equation 9.37 in the form Newton's second law for a system of particles Fext MaCM dptot dt (9.38) That is, the resultant external force on a system of particles equals the total mass of the system multiplied by the acceleration of the center of mass. If we compare this with Newton's second law for a single particle, we see that The center of mass of a system of particles of combined mass M moves like an equivalent particle of mass M would move under the influence of the resultant external force on the system. Finally, we see that if the resultant external force is zero, then from Equation 9.38 it follows that dptot dt MaCM 0 9.7 Motion of a System of Particles 275 Figure 9.25 Multiflash photograph showing an overhead view of a wrench moving on a horizontal surface. The center of mass of the wrench moves in a straight line as the wrench rotates about this point, shown by the white dots. so that ptot MvCM constant (when Fext 0) (9.39) That is, the total linear momentum of a system of particles is conserved if no net external force is acting on the system. It follows that for an isolated system of particles, both the total momentum and the velocity of the center of mass are constant in time, as shown in Figure 9.25. This is a generalization to a many-particle system of the law of conservation of momentum discussed in Section 9.1 for a two-particle system. Suppose an isolated system consisting of two or more members is at rest. The center of mass of such a system remains at rest unless acted upon by an external force. For example, consider a system made up of a swimmer standing on a raft, with the system initially at rest. When the swimmer dives horizontally off the raft, the center of mass of the system remains at rest (if we neglect friction between raft and water). Furthermore, the linear momentum of the diver is equal in magnitude to that of the raft but opposite in direction. As another example, suppose an unstable atom initially at rest suddenly breaks up into two fragments of masses MA and MB , with velocities vA and vB , respectively. Because the total momentum of the system before the breakup is zero, the total momentum of the system after the breakup must also be zero. Therefore, MAvA MBvB 0. If the velocity of one of the fragments is known, the recoil velocity of the other fragment can be calculated. EXAMPLE 9.15 The Sliding Bear noting your location. Take off your spiked shoes and pull on the rope hand over hand. Both you and the bear will slide over the ice until you meet. From the tape, observe how far you have slid, xp , and how far the bear has slid, xb . The point where you meet the bear is the constant location of the center of mass of the system (bear plus you), and so you can determine the mass of the bear from m b x b m p x p . (Unfortunately, you cannot get back to your spiked shoes and so are in big trouble if the bear wakes up!) Suppose you tranquilize a polar bear on a smooth glacier as part of a research effort. How might you estimate the bear's mass using a measuring tape, a rope, and knowledge of your own mass? Solution Tie one end of the rope around the bear, and then lay out the tape measure on the ice with one end at the bear's original position, as shown in Figure 9.26. Grab hold of the free end of the rope and position yourself as shown, 276 CHAPTER 9 Linear Momentum and Collisions xp CM xb Figure 9.26 The center of mass of an isolated system remains at rest unless acted on by an external force. How can you determine the mass of the polar bear? CONCEPTUAL EXAMPLE 9.16 Exploding Projectile the center of mass of the system made up of all the fragments after the explosion? A projectile fired into the air suddenly explodes into several fragments (Fig. 9.27). What can be said about the motion of Motion of center of mass Solution Neglecting air resistance, the only external force on the projectile is the gravitational force. Thus, if the projectile did not explode, it would continue to move along the parabolic path indicated by the broken line in Figure 9.27. Because the forces caused by the explosion are internal, they do not affect the motion of the center of mass. Thus, after the explosion the center of mass of the system (the fragments) follows the same parabolic path the projectile would have followed if there had been no explosion. Figure 9.27 When a projectile explodes into several fragments, the center of mass of the system made up of all the fragments follows the same parabolic path the projectile would have taken had there been no explosion. EXAMPLE 9.17 The Exploding Rocket A rocket is fired vertically upward. At the instant it reaches an altitude of 1 000 m and a speed of 300 m/s, it explodes into three equal fragments. One fragment continues to move upward with a speed of 450 m/s following the explosion. The second fragment has a speed of 240 m/s and is moving east right after the explosion. What is the velocity of the third fragment right after the explosion? Solution Let us call the total mass of the rocket M; hence, the mass of each fragment is M/3. Because the forces of the explosion are internal to the system and cannot affect its total momentum, the total momentum pi of the rocket just before the explosion must equal the total momentum pf of the fragments right after the explosion. 9.8 Before the explosion: pi After the explosion: pf M (240 i) m/s 3 M (450 j) m/s 3 M v 3 f M vi M(300 j) m/s Rocket Propulsion 277 vf ( 240i 450j) m/s What does the sum of the momentum vectors for all the fragments look like? Exercise where vf is the unknown velocity of the third fragment. Equating these two expressions (because pi pf ) gives M v 3 f M(80 i) m/s M(150 j) m/s M(300 j) m/s Find the position of the center of mass of the system of fragments relative to the ground 3.00 s after the explosion. Assume the rocket engine is nonoperative after the explosion. The x coordinate does not change; yCM 1.86 km. Answer Optional Section 9.8 ROCKET PROPULSION When ordinary vehicles, such as automobiles and locomotives, are propelled, the driving force for the motion is friction. In the case of the automobile, the driving force is the force exerted by the road on the car. A locomotive "pushes" against the tracks; hence, the driving force is the force exerted by the tracks on the locomotive. However, a rocket moving in space has no road or tracks to push against. Therefore, the source of the propulsion of a rocket must be something other than friction. Figure 9.28 is a dramatic photograph of a spacecraft at liftoff. The operation of a rocket depends upon the law of conservation of linear momentum as applied to a system of particles, where the system is the rocket plus its ejected fuel. Rocket propulsion can be understood by first considering the mechanical system consisting of a machine gun mounted on a cart on wheels. As the gun is fired, Figure 9.28 Liftoff of the space shuttle Columbia. Enormous thrust is generated by the shuttle's liquid-fuel engines, aided by the two solid-fuel boosters. Many physical principles from mechanics, thermodynamics, and electricity and magnetism are involved in such a launch. 278 CHAPTER 9 Linear Momentum and Collisions The force from a nitrogen-propelled, hand-controlled device allows an astronaut to move about freely in space without restrictive tethers. v M + m each bullet receives a momentum mv in some direction, where v is measured with respect to a stationary Earth frame. The momentum of the system made up of cart, gun, and bullets must be conserved. Hence, for each bullet fired, the gun and cart must receive a compensating momentum in the opposite direction. That is, the reaction force exerted by the bullet on the gun accelerates the cart and gun, and the cart moves in the direction opposite that of the bullets. If n is the number of bullets fired each second, then the average force exerted on the gun is Fav nmv. In a similar manner, as a rocket moves in free space, its linear momentum changes when some of its mass is released in the form of ejected gases. Because the gases are given momentum when they are ejected out of the engine, the rocket receives a compensating momentum in the opposite direction. Therefore, the rocket is accelerated as a result of the "push," or thrust, from the exhaust gases. In free space, the center of mass of the system (rocket plus expelled gases) moves uniformly, independent of the propulsion process.5 Suppose that at some time t, the magnitude of the momentum of a rocket plus its fuel is (M m)v, where v is the speed of the rocket relative to the Earth (Fig. 9.29a). Over a short time interval t, the rocket ejects fuel of mass m, and so at the end of this interval the rocket's speed is v v, where v is the change in speed of the rocket (Fig. 9.29b). If the fuel is ejected with a speed ve relative to the rocket (the subscript "e" stands for exhaust, and ve is usually called the exhaust speed), the velocity of the fuel relative to a stationary frame of reference is v ve . Thus, if we equate the total initial momentum of the system to the total final momentum, we obtain (M m)v M(v v) m(v ve) pi = (M + m)v (a) where M represents the mass of the rocket and its remaining fuel after an amount of fuel having mass m has been ejected. Simplifying this expression gives M v ve m M m v + v (b) Figure 9.29 Rocket propulsion. (a) The initial mass of the rocket plus all its fuel is M m at a time t, and its speed is v. (b) At a time t t, the rocket's mass has been reduced to M and an amount of fuel m has been ejected. The rocket's speed increases by an amount v. We also could have arrived at this result by considering the system in the center-of-mass frame of reference, which is a frame having the same velocity as the center of mass of the system. In this frame, the total momentum of the system is zero; therefore, if the rocket gains a momentum M v by ejecting some fuel, the exhausted fuel obtains a momentum ve m in the opposite direction, so that M v ve m 0. If we now take the limit as t goes to zero, we get v : dv and m : dm. Futhermore, the increase in the exhaust mass dm corresponds to an equal decrease in the rocket mass, so that dm dM. Note that dM is given a negative sign because it represents a decrease in mass. Using this fact, we obtain M dv ve dm ve dM (9.40) Integrating this equation and taking the initial mass of the rocket plus fuel to be Mi and the final mass of the rocket plus its remaining fuel to be Mf , we obtain vf Mf dv vi ve Mi dM M (9.41) Expression for rocket propulsion vf vi ve ln Mi Mf 5It is interesting to note that the rocket and machine gun represent cases of the reverse of a perfectly inelastic collision: Momentum is conserved, but the kinetic energy of the system increases (at the expense of chemical potential energy in the fuel). 9.8 Rocket Propulsion 279 This is the basic expression of rocket propulsion. First, it tells us that the increase in rocket speed is proportional to the exhaust speed of the ejected gases, ve . Therefore, the exhaust speed should be very high. Second, the increase in rocket speed is proportional to the natural logarithm of the ratio Mi /Mf . Therefore, this ratio should be as large as possible, which means that the mass of the rocket without its fuel should be as small as possible and the rocket should carry as much fuel as possible. The thrust on the rocket is the force exerted on it by the ejected exhaust gases. We can obtain an expression for the thrust from Equation 9.40: Thrust M dv dt ve dM dt (9.42) This expression shows us that the thrust increases as the exhaust speed increases and as the rate of change of mass (called the burn rate) increases. EXAMPLE 9.18 A Rocket in Space 3.0 6.5 103 m/s 103 m/s (5.0 103 m/s)ln Mi 0.5 Mi A rocket moving in free space has a speed of 3.0 103 m/s relative to the Earth. Its engines are turned on, and fuel is ejected in a direction opposite the rocket's motion at a speed of 5.0 103 m/s relative to the rocket. (a) What is the speed of the rocket relative to the Earth once the rocket's mass is reduced to one-half its mass before ignition? Solution We can guess that the speed we are looking for must be greater than the original speed because the rocket is accelerating. Applying Equation 9.41, we obtain vf vi Mi ve ln Mf (b) What is the thrust on the rocket if it burns fuel at the rate of 50 kg/s? Solution Thrust ve dM dt (5.0 105 N 103 m/s)(50 kg/s) 2.5 EXAMPLE 9.19 Fighting a Fire their hands, the movement of the hose due to the thrust it receives from the rapidly exiting water could injure the firefighters. Two firefighters must apply a total force of 600 N to steady a hose that is discharging water at 3 600 L/min. Estimate the speed of the water as it exits the nozzle. Solution The water is exiting at 3 600 L/min, which is 60 L/s. Knowing that 1 L of water has a mass of 1 kg, we can say that about 60 kg of water leaves the nozzle every second. As the water leaves the hose, it exerts on the hose a thrust that must be counteracted by the 600-N force exerted on the hose by the firefighters. So, applying Equation 9.42 gives Thrust 600 N ve ve dM dt ve(60 kg/s) 10 m/s Firefighters attack a burning house with a hose line. Firefighting is dangerous work. If the nozzle should slip from 280 CHAPTER 9 Linear Momentum and Collisions SUMMARY The linear momentum p of a particle of mass m moving with a velocity v is p mv (9.1) The law of conservation of linear momentum indicates that the total momentum of an isolated system is conserved. If two particles form an isolated system, their total momentum is conserved regardless of the nature of the force between them. Therefore, the total momentum of the system at all times equals its initial total momentum, or p1i p2i p1f p2f (9.5) The impulse imparted to a particle by a force F is equal to the change in the momentum of the particle: tf I ti F dt p (9.9) This is known as the impulse momentum theorem. Impulsive forces are often very strong compared with other forces on the system and usually act for a very short time, as in the case of collisions. When two particles collide, the total momentum of the system before the collision always equals the total momentum after the collision, regardless of the nature of the collision. An inelastic collision is one for which the total kinetic energy is not conserved. A perfectly inelastic collision is one in which the colliding bodies stick together after the collision. An elastic collision is one in which kinetic energy is constant. In a two- or three-dimensional collision, the components of momentum in each of the three directions (x, y, and z) are conserved independently. The position vector of the center of mass of a system of particles is defined as rCM i mi ri M (9.30) mi is the total mass of the system and ri is the position vector of the where M i ith particle. The position vector of the center of mass of a rigid body can be obtained from the integral expression 1 rCM r dm (9.33) M The velocity of the center of mass for a system of particles is vCM i mi vi M (9.34) The total momentum of a system of particles equals the total mass multiplied by the velocity of the center of mass. Newton's second law applied to a system of particles is Fext MaCM dptot dt (9.38) where aCM is the acceleration of the center of mass and the sum is over all external forces. The center of mass moves like an imaginary particle of mass M under the Questions 281 influence of the resultant external force on the system. It follows from Equation 9.38 that the total momentum of the system is conserved if there are no external forces acting on it. QUESTIONS 1. If the kinetic energy of a particle is zero, what is its linear momentum? 2. If the speed of a particle is doubled, by what factor is its momentum changed? By what factor is its kinetic energy changed? 3. If two particles have equal kinetic energies, are their momenta necessarily equal? Explain. 4. If two particles have equal momenta, are their kinetic energies necessarily equal? Explain. 5. An isolated system is initially at rest. Is it possible for parts of the system to be in motion at some later time? If so, explain how this might occur. 6. If two objects collide and one is initially at rest, is it possible for both to be at rest after the collision? Is it possible for one to be at rest after the collision? Explain. 7. Explain how linear momentum is conserved when a ball bounces from a floor. 8. Is it possible to have a collision in which all of the kinetic energy is lost? If so, cite an example. 9. In a perfectly elastic collision between two particles, does the kinetic energy of each particle change as a result of the collision? 10. When a ball rolls down an incline, its linear momentum increases. Does this imply that momentum is not conserved? Explain. 11. Consider a perfectly inelastic collision between a car and a large truck. Which vehicle loses more kinetic energy as a result of the collision? 12. Can the center of mass of a body lie outside the body? If so, give examples. 13. Three balls are thrown into the air simultaneously. What is the acceleration of their center of mass while they are in motion? 14. A meter stick is balanced in a horizontal position with the index fingers of the right and left hands. If the two fingers are slowly brought together, the stick remains balanced and the two fingers always meet at the 50-cm mark regardless of their original positions (try it!). Explain. 15. A sharpshooter fires a rifle while standing with the butt of the gun against his shoulder. If the forward momentum of a bullet is the same as the backward momentum of the gun, why is it not as dangerous to be hit by the gun as by the bullet? 16. A piece of mud is thrown against a brick wall and sticks to the wall. What happens to the momentum of the mud? Is momentum conserved? Explain. 17. Early in this century, Robert Goddard proposed sending a rocket to the Moon. Critics took the position that in a vacuum, such as exists between the Earth and the Moon, the gases emitted by the rocket would have nothing to push against to propel the rocket. According to Scientific American ( January 1975), Goddard placed a gun in a vacuum and fired a blank cartridge from it. (A blank cartridge fires only the wadding and hot gases of the burning gunpowder.) What happened when the gun was fired? 18. A pole-vaulter falls from a height of 6.0 m onto a foam rubber pad. Can you calculate his speed just before he reaches the pad? Can you estimate the force exerted on him due to the collision? Explain. 19. Explain how you would use a balloon to demonstrate the mechanism responsible for rocket propulsion. 20. Does the center of mass of a rocket in free space accelerate? Explain. Can the speed of a rocket exceed the exhaust speed of the fuel? Explain. 21. A ball is dropped from a tall building. Identify the system for which linear momentum is conserved. 22. A bomb, initially at rest, explodes into several pieces. (a) Is linear momentum conserved? (b) Is kinetic energy conserved? Explain. 23. NASA often uses the gravity of a planet to "slingshot" a probe on its way to a more distant planet. This is actually a collision where the two objects do not touch. How can the probe have its speed increased in this manner? 24. The Moon revolves around the Earth. Is the Moon's linear momentum conserved? Is its kinetic energy conserved? Assume that the Moon's orbit is circular. 25. A raw egg dropped to the floor breaks apart upon impact. However, a raw egg dropped onto a thick foam rubber cushion from a height of about 1 m rebounds without breaking. Why is this possible? (If you try this experiment, be sure to catch the egg after the first bounce.) 26. On the subject of the following positions, state your own view and argue to support it: (a) The best theory of motion is that force causes acceleration. (b) The true measure of a force's effectiveness is the work it does, and the best theory of motion is that work on an object changes its energy. (c) The true measure of a force's effect is impulse, and the best theory of motion is that impulse injected into an object changes its momentum. 282 CHAPTER 9 Linear Momentum and Collisions PROBLEMS 1, 2, 3 = straightforward, intermediate, challenging = full solution available in the Student Solutions Manual and Study Guide WEB = solution posted at http://www.saunderscollege.com/physics/ = Computer useful in solving problem = Interactive Physics = paired numerical/symbolic problems Section 9.1 Linear Momentum and Its Conservation 1. A 3.00-kg particle has a velocity of (3.00i 4.00j) m/s. (a) Find its x and y components of momentum. (b) Find the magnitude and direction of its momentum. 2. A 0.100-kg ball is thrown straight up into the air with an initial speed of 15.0 m/s. Find the momentum of the ball (a) at its maximum height and (b) halfway up to its maximum height. 3. A 40.0-kg child standing on a frozen pond throws a 0.500-kg stone to the east with a speed of 5.00 m/s. Neglecting friction between child and ice, find the recoil velocity of the child. 4. A pitcher claims he can throw a baseball with as much momentum as a 3.00-g bullet moving with a speed of 1 500 m/s. A baseball has a mass of 0.145 kg. What must be its speed if the pitcher's claim is valid? 5. How fast can you set the Earth moving? In particular, when you jump straight up as high as you can, you give the Earth a maximum recoil speed of what order of magnitude? Model the Earth as a perfectly solid object. In your solution, state the physical quantities you take as data and the values you measure or estimate for them. 6. Two blocks of masses M and 3M are placed on a horizontal, frictionless surface. A light spring is attached to one of them, and the blocks are pushed together with the spring between them (Fig. P9.6). A cord initially holding the blocks together is burned; after this, the block of mass 3M moves to the right with a speed of 2.00 m/s. (a) What is the speed of the block of mass M ? (b) Find the original elastic energy in the spring if M 0.350 kg. 7. (a) A particle of mass m moves with momentum p. Show that the kinetic energy of the particle is given by K p 2/2m. (b) Express the magnitude of the particle's momentum in terms of its kinetic energy and mass. Section 9.2 Impulse and Momentum 8. A car is stopped for a traffic signal. When the light turns green, the car accelerates, increasing its speed from zero to 5.20 m/s in 0.832 s. What linear impulse and average force does a 70.0-kg passenger in the car experience? 9. An estimated force time curve for a baseball struck by a bat is shown in Figure P9.9. From this curve, determine (a) the impulse delivered to the ball, (b) the average force exerted on the ball, and (c) the peak force exerted on the ball. F(N) 20 000 15 000 10 000 5 000 0 F = 18 000 N 1 2 3 t(ms) Figure P9.9 10. A tennis player receives a shot with the ball (0.060 0 kg) traveling horizontally at 50.0 m/s and returns the shot with the ball traveling horizontally at 40.0 m/s in the opposite direction. (a) What is the impulse delivered to the ball by the racket? (b) What work does the racket do on the ball? 11. A 3.00-kg steel ball strikes a wall with a speed of 10.0 m/s at an angle of 60.0 with the surface. It bounces off with the same speed and angle (Fig. P9.11). If the ball is in contact with the wall for 0.200 s, what is the average force exerted on the ball by the wall? 12. In a slow-pitch softball game, a 0.200-kg softball crossed the plate at 15.0 m/s at an angle of 45.0 below the horizontal. The ball was hit at 40.0 m/s, 30.0 above the horizontal. (a) Determine the impulse delivered to the ball. (b) If the force on the ball increased linearly for 4.00 ms, held constant for 20.0 ms, and then decreased to zero linearly in another 4.00 ms, what was the maximum force on the ball? M Before 3M WEB (a) v 2.00 m/s M After (b) 3M Figure P9.6 Problems y 60.0 x 60.0 283 Figure P9.11 13. A garden hose is held in the manner shown in Figure P9.13. The hose is initially full of motionless water. What additional force is necessary to hold the nozzle stationary after the water is turned on if the discharge rate is 0.600 kg/s with a speed of 25.0 m/s? inside the block. The speed of the bullet-plus-wood combination immediately after the collision is measured as 0.600 m/s. What was the original speed of the bullet? 18. As shown in Figure P9.18, a bullet of mass m and speed v passes completely through a pendulum bob of mass M. The bullet emerges with a speed of v/2. The pendulum bob is suspended by a stiff rod of length and negligible mass. What is the minimum value of v such that the pendulum bob will barely swing through a complete vertical circle? m v M v/2 Figure P9.18 19. A 45.0-kg girl is standing on a plank that has a mass of 150 kg. The plank, originally at rest, is free to slide on a frozen lake, which is a flat, frictionless supporting surface. The girl begins to walk along the plank at a constant speed of 1.50 m/s relative to the plank. (a) What is her speed relative to the ice surface? (b) What is the speed of the plank relative to the ice surface? 20. Gayle runs at a speed of 4.00 m/s and dives on a sled, which is initially at rest on the top of a frictionless snowcovered hill. After she has descended a vertical distance of 5.00 m, her brother, who is initially at rest, hops on her back and together they continue down the hill. What is their speed at the bottom of the hill if the total vertical drop is 15.0 m? Gayle's mass is 50.0 kg, the sled has a mass of 5.00 kg and her brother has a mass of 30.0 kg. 21. A 1 200-kg car traveling initially with a speed of 25.0 m/s in an easterly direction crashes into the rear end of a 9 000-kg truck moving in the same direction at 20.0 m/s (Fig. P9.21). The velocity of the car right after the collision is 18.0 m/s to the east. (a) What is the velocity of the truck right after the collision? (b) How much mechanical energy is lost in the collision? Account for this loss in energy. 22. A railroad car of mass 2.50 104 kg is moving with a speed of 4.00 m/s. It collides and couples with three other coupled railroad cars, each of the same mass as the single car and moving in the same direction with an initial speed of 2.00 m/s. (a) What is the speed of the four cars after the collision? (b) How much energy is lost in the collision? Figure P9.13 14. A professional diver performs a dive from a platform 10 m above the water surface. Estimate the order of magnitude of the average impact force she experiences in her collision with the water. State the quantities you take as data and their values. Section 9.3 Collisions Section 9.4 Elastic and Inelastic Collisions in One Dimension 15. High-speed stroboscopic photographs show that the head of a golf club of mass 200 g is traveling at 55.0 m/s just before it strikes a 46.0-g golf ball at rest on a tee. After the collision, the club head travels (in the same direction) at 40.0 m/s. Find the speed of the golf ball just after impact. 16. A 75.0-kg ice skater, moving at 10.0 m/s, crashes into a stationary skater of equal mass. After the collision, the two skaters move as a unit at 5.00 m/s. Suppose the average force a skater can experience without breaking a bone is 4 500 N. If the impact time is 0.100 s, does a bone break? 17. A 10.0-g bullet is fired into a stationary block of wood (m 5.00 kg). The relative motion of the bullet stops 284 25.0 m/s CHAPTER 9 20.0 m/s BIG Linear Momentum and Collisions 18.0 m/s v BIG Joes IRISH BEER Joes IRISH BEER Before After Figure P9.21 23. Four railroad cars, each of mass 2.50 104 kg, are coupled together and coasting along horizontal tracks at a speed of vi toward the south. A very strong but foolish movie actor, riding on the second car, uncouples the front car and gives it a big push, increasing its speed to 4.00 m/s southward. The remaining three cars continue moving toward the south, now at 2.00 m/s. (a) Find the initial speed of the cars. (b) How much work did the actor do? (c) State the relationship between the process described here and the process in Problem 22. 24. A 7.00-kg bowling ball collides head-on with a 2.00-kg bowling pin. The pin flies forward with a speed of 3.00 m/s. If the ball continues forward with a speed of 1.80 m/s, what was the initial speed of the ball? Ignore rotation of the ball. 25. A neutron in a reactor makes an elastic head-on collision with the nucleus of a carbon atom initially at rest. (a) What fraction of the neutron's kinetic energy is transferred to the carbon nucleus? (b) If the initial kinetic energy of the neutron is 1.60 10 13 J, find its final kinetic energy and the kinetic energy of the carbon nucleus after the collision. (The mass of the carbon nucleus is about 12.0 times greater than the mass of the neutron.) 26. Consider a frictionless track ABC as shown in Figure P9.26. A block of mass m 1 5.00 kg is released from A. It makes a head-on elastic collision at B with a block of mass m 2 10.0 kg that is initially at rest. Calculate the maximum height to which m 1 rises after the collision. 0.650, what was the speed of the bullet immediately before impact? 28. A 7.00-g bullet, when fired from a gun into a 1.00-kg block of wood held in a vise, would penetrate the block to a depth of 8.00 cm. This block of wood is placed on a frictionless horizontal surface, and a 7.00-g bullet is fired from the gun into the block. To what depth will the bullet penetrate the block in this case? Section 9.5 Two-Dimensional Collisions WEB 29. A 90.0-kg fullback running east with a speed of 5.00 m/s is tackled by a 95.0-kg opponent running north with a speed of 3.00 m/s. If the collision is perfectly inelastic, (a) calculate the speed and direction of the players just after the tackle and (b) determine the energy lost as a result of the collision. Account for the missing energy. 30. The mass of the blue puck in Figure P9.30 is 20.0% greater than the mass of the green one. Before colliding, the pucks approach each other with equal and opposite momenta, and the green puck has an initial speed of 10.0 m/s. Find the speeds of the pucks after the collision if half the kinetic energy is lost during the collision. 30.0 30.0 A m1 5.00 m m2 B C Figure P9.30 31. Two automobiles of equal mass approach an intersection. One vehicle is traveling with velocity 13.0 m/s toward the east and the other is traveling north with a speed of v2i . Neither driver sees the other. The vehicles collide in the intersection and stick together, leaving parallel skid marks at an angle of 55.0 north of east. The speed limit for both roads is 35 mi/h, and the driver of the northward-moving vehicle claims he was within the speed limit when the collision occurred. Is he telling the truth? Figure P9.26 WEB 27. A 12.0-g bullet is fired into a 100-g wooden block initially at rest on a horizontal surface. After impact, the block slides 7.50 m before coming to rest. If the coefficient of friction between the block and the surface is Problems 32. A proton, moving with a velocity of vi i, collides elastically with another proton that is initially at rest. If the two protons have equal speeds after the collision, find (a) the speed of each proton after the collision in terms of vi and (b) the direction of the velocity vectors after the collision. 33. A billiard ball moving at 5.00 m/s strikes a stationary ball of the same mass. After the collision, the first ball moves at 4.33 m/s and at an angle of 30.0 with respect to the original line of motion. Assuming an elastic collision (and ignoring friction and rotational motion), find the struck ball's velocity. 34. A 0.300-kg puck, initially at rest on a horizontal, frictionless surface, is struck by a 0.200-kg puck moving initially along the x axis with a speed of 2.00 m/s. After the collision, the 0.200-kg puck has a speed of 1.00 m/s at an angle of 53.0 to the positive x axis (see Fig. 9.14). (a) Determine the velocity of the 0.300-kg puck after the collision. (b) Find the fraction of kinetic energy lost in the collision. 35. A 3.00-kg mass with an initial velocity of 5.00i m/s collides with and sticks to a 2.00-kg mass with an initial velocity of 3.00j m/s. Find the final velocity of the composite mass. 36. Two shuffleboard disks of equal mass, one orange and the other yellow, are involved in an elastic, glancing collision. The yellow disk is initially at rest and is struck by the orange disk moving with a speed of 5.00 m/s. After the collision, the orange disk moves along a direction that makes an angle of 37.0 with its initial direction of motion, and the velocity of the yellow disk is perpendicular to that of the orange disk (after the collision). Determine the final speed of each disk. 37. Two shuffleboard disks of equal mass, one orange and the other yellow, are involved in an elastic, glancing collision. The yellow disk is initially at rest and is struck by the orange disk moving with a speed vi . After the collision, the orange disk moves along a direction that makes an angle with its initial direction of motion, and the velocity of the yellow disk is perpendicular to that of the orange disk (after the collision). Determine the final speed of each disk. 38. During the battle of Gettysburg, the gunfire was so intense that several bullets collided in midair and fused together. Assume a 5.00-g Union musket ball was moving to the right at a speed of 250 m/s, 20.0 above the horizontal, and that a 3.00-g Confederate ball was moving to the left at a speed of 280 m/s, 15.0 above the horizontal. Immediately after they fuse together, what is their velocity? 39. An unstable nucleus of mass 17.0 10 27 kg initially at rest disintegrates into three particles. One of the particles, of mass 5.00 10 27 kg, moves along the y axis with a velocity of 6.00 106 m/s. Another particle, of mass 8.40 10 27 kg, moves along the x axis with a speed of 4.00 106 m/s. Find (a) the velocity of the 285 third particle and (b) the total kinetic energy increase in the process. Section 9.6 The Center of Mass 40. Four objects are situated along the y axis as follows: A 2.00-kg object is at 3.00 m, a 3.00-kg object is at 2.50 m, a 2.50-kg object is at the origin, and a 4.00-kg object is at 0.500 m. Where is the center of mass of these objects? 41. A uniform piece of sheet steel is shaped as shown in Figure P9.41. Compute the x and y coordinates of the center of mass of the piece. y(cm) 30 20 10 10 20 30 x(cm) Figure P9.41 42. The mass of the Earth is 5.98 1024 kg, and the mass of the Moon is 7.36 1022 kg. The distance of separation, measured between their centers, is 3.84 108 m. Locate the center of mass of the Earth Moon system as measured from the center of the Earth. 43. A water molecule consists of an oxygen atom with two hydrogen atoms bound to it (Fig. P9.43). The angle between the two bonds is 106. If the bonds are 0.100 nm long, where is the center of mass of the molecule? H 0.100 nm 53 O 53 0.100 nm H WEB Figure P9.43 286 CHAPTER 9 Linear Momentum and Collisions of the velocity of the center of mass. (c) Write the position vector of the center of mass as a function of time. 49. A 2.00-kg particle has a velocity of (2.00i 3.00j) m/s, and a 3.00-kg particle has a velocity of (1.00i 6.00j) m/s. Find (a) the velocity of the center of mass and (b) the total momentum of the system. 50. A ball of mass 0.200 kg has a velocity of 1.50i m/s; a ball of mass 0.300 kg has a velocity of 0.400i m/s. They meet in a head-on elastic collision. (a) Find their velocities after the collision. (b) Find the velocity of their center of mass before and after the collision. (Optional) 44. A 0.400-kg mass m1 has position r1 12.0j cm. A 0.800kg mass m 2 has position r2 12.0i cm. Another 0.800-kg mass m3 has position r3 (12.0i 12.0j) cm. Make a drawing of the masses. Start from the origin and, to the scale 1 cm 1 kg cm, construct the vector m1r1 , then the vector m1r1 m 2 r2 , then the vector m1r1 m 2 r2 m 3 r3 , and at last rCM (m1r1 m 2 r2 m 3 r3 )/(m1 m 2 m 3 ). Observe that the head of the vector rCM indicates the position of the center of mass. 45. A rod of length 30.0 cm has linear density (mass-perlength) given by 50.0 g/m 20.0x g/m2 where x is the distance from one end, measured in meters. (a) What is the mass of the rod? (b) How far from the x 0 end is its center of mass? Section 9.8 WEB Rocket Propulsion Section 9.7 Motion of a System of Particles 46. Consider a system of two particles in the xy plane: m1 2.00 kg is at r1 (1.00i 2.00j) m and has velocity (3.00i 0.500j) m/s; m 2 3.00 kg is at r2 ( 4.00i 3.00j) m and has velocity (3.00i 2.00j) m/s. (a) Plot these particles on a grid or graph paper. Draw their position vectors and show their velocities. (b) Find the position of the center of mass of the system and mark it on the grid. (c) Determine the velocity of the center of mass and also show it on the diagram. (d) What is the total linear momentum of the system? 47. Romeo (77.0 kg) entertains Juliet (55.0 kg) by playing his guitar from the rear of their boat at rest in still water, 2.70 m away from Juliet who is in the front of the boat. After the serenade, Juliet carefully moves to the rear of the boat (away from shore) to plant a kiss on Romeo's cheek. How far does the 80.0-kg boat move toward the shore it is facing? 48. Two masses, 0.600 kg and 0.300 kg, begin uniform motion at the same speed, 0.800 m/s, from the origin at t 0 and travel in the directions shown in Figure P9.48. (a) Find the velocity of the center of mass in unit vector notation. (b) Find the magnitude and direction y 51. The first stage of a Saturn V space vehicle consumes fuel and oxidizer at the rate of 1.50 104 kg/s, with an exhaust speed of 2.60 103 m/s. (a) Calculate the thrust produced by these engines. (b) Find the initial acceleration of the vehicle on the launch pad if its initial mass is 3.00 106 kg. [Hint: You must include the force of gravity to solve part (b).] 52. A large rocket with an exhaust speed of ve 3 000 m/s develops a thrust of 24.0 million newtons. (a) How much mass is being blasted out of the rocket exhaust per second? (b) What is the maximum speed the rocket can attain if it starts from rest in a force-free environment with ve 3.00 km/s and if 90.0% of its initial mass is fuel and oxidizer? 53. A rocket for use in deep space is to have the capability of boosting a total load (payload plus rocket frame and engine) of 3.00 metric tons to a speed of 10 000 m/s. (a) It has an engine and fuel designed to produce an exhaust speed of 2 000 m/s. How much fuel plus oxidizer is required? (b) If a different fuel and engine design could give an exhaust speed of 5 000 m/s, what amount of fuel and oxidizer would be required for the same task? 54. A rocket car has a mass of 2 000 kg unfueled and a mass of 5 000 kg when completely fueled. The exhaust velocity is 2 500 m/s. (a) Calculate the amount of fuel used to accelerate the completely fueled car from rest to 225 m/s (about 500 mi/h). (b) If the burn rate is constant at 30.0 kg/s, calculate the time it takes the car to reach this speed. Neglect friction and air resistance. 0.600 kg 0.300 kg ADDITIONAL PROBLEMS 55. Review Problem. A 60.0-kg person running at an initial speed of 4.00 m/s jumps onto a 120-kg cart initially at rest (Fig. P9.55). The person slides on the cart's top surface and finally comes to rest relative to the cart. The coefficient of kinetic friction between the person and the cart is 0.400. Friction between the cart and ground can be neglected. (a) Find the final velocity of the person and cart relative to the ground. (b) Find the frictional force acting on the person while he is sliding 45.0 45.0 x Figure P9.48 Problems across the top surface of the cart. (c) How long does the frictional force act on the person? (d) Find the change in momentum of the person and the change in momentum of the cart. (e) Determine the displacement of the person relative to the ground while he is sliding on the cart. (f) Determine the displacement of the cart relative to the ground while the person is sliding. (g) Find the change in kinetic energy of the person. (h) Find the change in kinetic energy of the cart. (i) Explain why the answers to parts (g) and (h) differ. (What kind of collision is this, and what accounts for the loss of mechanical energy?) 287 58. A bullet of mass m is fired into a block of mass M that is initially at rest at the edge of a frictionless table of height h (see Fig. P9.57). The bullet remains in the block, and after impact the block lands a distance d from the bottom of the table. Determine the initial speed of the bullet. 59. An 80.0-kg astronaut is working on the engines of his ship, which is drifting through space with a constant velocity. The astronaut, wishing to get a better view of the Universe, pushes against the ship and much later finds himself 30.0 m behind the ship and at rest with respect to it. Without a thruster, the only way to return to the ship is to throw his 0.500-kg wrench directly away from the ship. If he throws the wrench with a speed of 20.0 m/s relative to the ship, how long does it take the astronaut to reach the ship? 60. A small block of mass m1 0.500 kg is released from rest at the top of a curve-shaped frictionless wedge of mass m 2 3.00 kg, which sits on a frictionless horizontal surface, as shown in Figure P9.60a. When the block leaves the wedge, its velocity is measured to be 4.00 m/s to the right, as in Figure P9.60b. (a) What is the velocity of the wedge after the block reaches the horizontal surface? (b) What is the height h of the wedge? m1 60.0 kg 4.00 m/s 120 kg Figure P9.55 56. A golf ball (m 46.0 g) is struck a blow that makes an angle of 45.0 with the horizontal. The ball lands 200 m away on a flat fairway. If the golf club and ball are in contact for 7.00 ms, what is the average force of impact? (Neglect air resistance.) 57. An 8.00-g bullet is fired into a 2.50-kg block that is initially at rest at the edge of a frictionless table of height 1.00 m (Fig. P9.57). The bullet remains in the block, and after impact the block lands 2.00 m from the bottom of the table. Determine the initial speed of the bullet. h m2 v2 m2 4.00 m/s (a) (b) Figure P9.60 8.00 g 2.50 kg 1.00 m 2.00 m Figure P9.57 Problems 57 and 58. 288 CHAPTER 9 Linear Momentum and Collisions 61. Tarzan, whose mass is 80.0 kg, swings from a 3.00-m vine that is horizontal when he starts. At the bottom of his arc, he picks up 60.0-kg Jane in a perfectly inelastic collision. What is the height of the highest tree limb they can reach on their upward swing? 62. A jet aircraft is traveling at 500 mi/h (223 m/s) in horizontal flight. The engine takes in air at a rate of 80.0 kg/s and burns fuel at a rate of 3.00 kg/s. If the exhaust gases are ejected at 600 m/s relative to the aircraft, find the thrust of the jet engine and the delivered horsepower. 63. A 75.0-kg firefighter slides down a pole while a constant frictional force of 300 N retards her motion. A horizontal 20.0-kg platform is supported by a spring at the bottom of the pole to cushion the fall. The firefighter starts from rest 4.00 m above the platform, and the spring constant is 4 000 N/m. Find (a) the firefighter's speed just before she collides with the platform and (b) the maximum distance the spring is compressed. (Assume the frictional force acts during the entire motion.) 64. A cannon is rigidly attached to a carriage, which can move along horizontal rails but is connected to a post by a large spring, initially unstretched and with force constant k 2.00 10 4 N/m, as shown in Figure P9.64. The cannon fires a 200-kg projectile at a velocity of 125 m/s directed 45.0 above the horizontal. (a) If the mass of the cannon and its carriage is 5 000 kg, find the recoil speed of the cannon. (b) Determine the maximum extension of the spring. (c) Find the maximum force the spring exerts on the carriage. (d) Consider the system consisting of the cannon, carriage, and shell. Is the momentum of this system conserved during the firing? Why or why not? x L Lx (a) (b) Figure P9.65 66. Two gliders are set in motion on an air track. A spring of force constant k is attached to the near side of one glider. The first glider of mass m 1 has a velocity of v1 , and the second glider of mass m 2 has a velocity of v2 , as shown in Figure P9.66 (v 1 v 2 ). When m 1 collides with the spring attached to m 2 and compresses the spring to its maximum compression xm , the velocity of the gliders is v. In terms of v1 , v2 , m 1 , m 2 , and k, find (a) the velocity v at maximum compression, (b) the maximum compression xm , and (c) the velocities of each glider after m1 has lost contact with the spring. v2 k v1 m1 m2 45.0 Figure P9.66 Figure P9.64 65. A chain of length L and total mass M is released from rest with its lower end just touching the top of a table, as shown in Figure P9.65a. Find the force exerted by the table on the chain after the chain has fallen through a distance x, as shown in Figure P9.65b. (Assume each link comes to rest the instant it reaches the table.) 67. Sand from a stationary hopper falls onto a moving conveyor belt at the rate of 5.00 kg/s, as shown in Figure P9.67. The conveyor belt is supported by frictionless rollers and moves at a constant speed of 0.750 m/s under the action of a constant horizontal external force Fext supplied by the motor that drives the belt. Find (a) the sand's rate of change of momentum in the horizontal direction, (b) the force of friction exerted by the belt on the sand, (c) the external force Fext , (d) the work done by Fext in 1 s, and (e) the kinetic energy acquired by the falling sand each second due to the change in its horizontal motion. (f) Why are the answers to parts (d) and (e) different? Problems 289 0.750 m/s Fext Figure P9.67 68. A rocket has total mass Mi 360 kg, including 330 kg of fuel and oxidizer. In interstellar space it starts from rest, turns on its engine at time t 0, and puts out exhaust with a relative speed of ve 1 500 m/s at the constant rate k 2.50 kg/s. Although the fuel will last for an actual burn time of 330 kg/(2.5 kg/s) 132 s, define a "projected depletion time" as Tp Mi /k 360 kg/(2.5 kg/s) 144 s. (This would be the burn time if the rocket could use its payload, fuel tanks, and even the walls of the combustion chamber as fuel.) (a) Show that during the burn the velocity of the rocket is given as a function of time by v(t) v e ln(1 t/Tp) tween the boat and the water, (a) describe the subsequent motion of the system (child plus boat). (b) Where is the child relative to the pier when he reaches the far end of the boat? (c) Will he catch the turtle? (Assume he can reach out 1.00 m from the end of the boat.) 70. A student performs a ballistic pendulum experiment, using an apparatus similar to that shown in Figure 9.11b. She obtains the following average data: h 8.68 cm, m1 68.8 g, and m 2 263 g. The symbols refer to the quantities in Figure 9.11a. (a) Determine the initial speed v1i of the projectile. (b) In the second part of her experiment she is to obtain v1i by firing the same projectile horizontally (with the pendulum removed from the path) and measuring its horizontal displacement x and vertical displacement y (Fig. P9.70). Show that the initial speed of the projectile is related to x and y through the relationship v 1i x 2y/g (b) Make a graph of the velocity of the rocket as a function of time for times running from 0 to 132 s. (c) Show that the acceleration of the rocket is a(t) v e /(Tp t) (d) Graph the acceleration as a function of time. (e) Show that the displacement of the rocket from its initial position at t 0 is x(t) v e(Tp t)ln(1 t/Tp) vet What numerical value does she obtain for v1i on the basis of her measured values of x 257 cm and y 85.3 cm? What factors might account for the difference in this value compared with that obtained in part (a)? (f) Graph the displacement during the burn. 69. A 40.0-kg child stands at one end of a 70.0-kg boat that is 4.00 m in length (Fig. P9.69). The boat is initially 3.00 m from the pier. The child notices a turtle on a rock near the far end of the boat and proceeds to walk to that end to catch the turtle. Neglecting friction bey v1i 3.00 m 4.00 m x Figure P9.70 Figure P9.69 71. A 5.00-g bullet moving with an initial speed of 400 m/s is fired into and passes through a 1.00-kg block, as shown in Figure P9.71. The block, initially at rest on a 290 CHAPTER 9 Linear Momentum and Collisions that mass m is moving downward after the collision at right angles from its initial direction. (a) Find the final speeds of the two masses. (b) What is the angle at which the mass 3m is scattered? 74. Review Problem. There are (one can say) three coequal theories of motion: Newton's second law, stating that the total force on an object causes its acceleration; the work kinetic energy theorem, stating that the total work on an object causes its change in kinetic energy; and the impulse momentum theorem, stating that the total impulse on an object causes its change in momentum. In this problem, you compare predictions of the three theories in one particular case. A 3.00-kg object has a velocity of 7.00j m/s. Then, a total force 12.0i N acts on the object for 5.00 s. (a) Calculate the object's final velocity, using the impulse momentum theorem. (b) Calculate its acceleration from a (vf vi)/t. (c) Calculate its acceleration from a F/m. (d) Find the object's vector displacement from r vit 1a t 2. 2 (e) Find the work done on the object from W F r. (f) Find the final kinetic energy from 1 mv f 2 1 mvf vf . 2 2 (g) Find the final kinetic energy from 1 mv i2 W. 2 75. A rocket has a total mass of Mi 360 kg, including 330 kg of fuel and oxidizer. In interstellar space it starts from rest. Its engine is turned on at time t 0, and it puts out exhaust with a relative speed of ve 1 500 m/s at the constant rate 2.50 kg/s. The burn lasts until the fuel runs out at time 330 kg/(2.5 kg/s) 132 s. Set up and carry out a computer analysis of the motion according to Euler's method. Find (a) the final velocity of the rocket and (b) the distance it travels during the burn. frictionless, horizontal surface, is connected to a spring of force constant 900 N/m. If the block moves 5.00 cm to the right after impact, find (a) the speed at which the bullet emerges from the block and (b) the energy lost in the collision. 400 m/s 5.00 cm v Figure P9.71 72. Two masses m and 3m are moving toward each other along the x axis with the same initial speeds vi . Mass m is traveling to the left, while mass 3m is traveling to the right. They undergo a head-on elastic collision and each rebounds along the same line as it approached. Find the final speeds of the masses. 73. Two masses m and 3m are moving toward each other along the x axis with the same initial speeds vi . Mass m is traveling to the left, while mass 3m is traveling to the right. They undergo an elastic glancing collision such ANSWERS TO QUICK QUIZZES 9.1 (d). Two identical objects (m1 m 2 ) traveling in the same direction at the same speed (v1 v 2 ) have the same kinetic energies and the same momenta. However, this is not true if the two objects are moving at the same speed but in different directions. In the latter case, K1 K 2 , but the differing velocity directions indicate that p 1 p 2 because momentum is a vector quantity. It also is possible for particular combinations of masses and velocities to satisfy K1 K 2 but not p 1 p 2 . For example, a 1-kg object moving at 2 m/s has the same kinetic energy as a 4-kg object moving at 1 m/s, but the two clearly do not have the same momenta. 9.2 (b), (c), (a). The slower the ball, the easier it is to catch. If the momentum of the medicine ball is the same as the momentum of the baseball, the speed of the medicine ball must be 1/10 the speed of the baseball because the medicine ball has 10 times the mass. If the kinetic energies are the same, the speed of the medicine ball must be 1/10 the speed of the baseball because of the squared speed term in the formula for K. The medicine ball is hardest to catch when it has the same speed as the baseball. 9.3 (c) and (e). Object 2 has a greater acceleration because of its smaller mass. Therefore, it takes less time to travel the distance d. Thus, even though the force applied to objects 1 and 2 is the same, the change in momentum is less for object 2 because t is smaller. Therefore, because the initial momenta were the same (both zero), p 1 p 2 . The work W Fd done on both objects is the same because both F and d are the same in the two cases. Therefore, K1 K 2 . 9.4 Because the passenger is brought from the car's initial speed to a full stop, the change in momentum (the impulse) is the same regardless of whether the passenger is stopped by dashboard, seatbelt, or airbag. However, the dashboard stops the passenger very quickly in a frontend collision. The seatbelt takes somewhat more time. Used along with the seatbelt, the airbag can extend the passenger's stopping time further, notably for his head, which would otherwise snap forward. Therefore, the Problems dashboard applies the greatest force, the seatbelt an intermediate force, and the airbag the least force. Airbags are designed to work in conjunction with seatbelts. Make sure you wear your seatbelt at all times while in a moving vehicle. 9.5 If we define the ball as our system, momentum is not conserved. The ball's speed -- and hence its momentum -- continually increase. This is consistent with the fact that the gravitational force is external to this chosen system. However, if we define our system as the ball and the Earth, momentum is conserved, for the Earth also has momentum because the ball exerts a gravitational force on it. As the ball falls, the Earth moves up to meet it (although the Earth's speed is on the order of 1025 times less than that of the ball!). This upward movement changes the Earth's momentum. The change in the Earth's momentum is numerically equal to the change in the ball's momentum but is in the opposite direction. Therefore, the total momentum of the Earthball system is conserved. Because the Earth's mass is so great, its upward motion is negligibly small. 9.6 (c). The greatest impulse (greatest change in momentum) is imparted to the Frisbee when the skater reverses its momentum vector by catching it and throwing it back. Since this is when the skater imparts the greatest impulse to the Frisbee, then this also is when the Frisbee imparts the greatest impulse to her. 9.7 Both are equally bad. Imagine watching the collision from a safer location alongside the road. As the "crush zones" of the two cars are compressed, you will see that 291 the actual point of contact is stationary. You would see the same thing if your car were to collide with a solid wall. 9.8 No, such movement can never occur if we assume the collisions are elastic. The momentum of the system before the collision is mv, where m is the mass of ball 1 and v is its speed just before the collision. After the collision, we would have two balls, each of mass m and moving with a speed of v/2. Thus, the total momentum of the system after the collision would be m(v/2) m(v/2) mv. Thus, momentum is conserved. However, the kinetic energy just before the collision is K i 1 mv 2, and that 2 after the collision is K f 1 m(v/2)2 1 m(v/2)2 1mv 2. 2 2 4 Thus, kinetic energy is not conserved. Both momentum and kinetic energy are conserved only when one ball moves out when one ball is released, two balls move out when two are released, and so on. 9.9 No they will not! The piece with the handle will have less mass than the piece made up of the end of the bat. To see why this is so, take the origin of coordinates as the center of mass before the bat was cut. Replace each cut piece by a small sphere located at the center of mass for each piece. The sphere representing the handle piece is farther from the origin, but the product of lesser mass and greater distance balances the product of greater mass and lesser distance for the end piece: P U Z Z L E R Did you know that the CD inside this player spins at different speeds, depending on which song is playing? Why would such a strange characteristic be incorporated into the design of every CD player? (George Semple) c h a p t e r Rotation of a Rigid Object About a Fixed Axis Chapter Outline 10.1 Angular Displacement, Velocity, and Acceleration 10.5 Calculation of Moments of Inertia 10.2 Rotational Kinematics: Rotational Motion with Constant Angular Acceleration 10.6 Torque 10.7 Relationship Between Torque and Angular Acceleration 10.3 Angular and Linear Quantities 10.4 Rotational Energy 292 10.8 Work, Power, and Energy in Rotational Motion 10.1 Angular Displacement, Velocity, and Acceleration 293 W hen an extended object, such as a wheel, rotates about its axis, the motion cannot be analyzed by treating the object as a particle because at any given time different parts of the object have different linear velocities and linear accelerations. For this reason, it is convenient to consider an extended object as a large number of particles, each of which has its own linear velocity and linear acceleration. In dealing with a rotating object, analysis is greatly simplified by assuming that the object is rigid. A rigid object is one that is nondeformable -- that is, it is an object in which the separations between all pairs of particles remain constant. All real bodies are deformable to some extent; however, our rigid-object model is useful in many situations in which deformation is negligible. In this chapter, we treat the rotation of a rigid object about a fixed axis, which is commonly referred to as pure rotational motion. Rigid object 10.1 ANGULAR DISPLACEMENT, VELOCITY, AND ACCELERATION y Figure 10.1 illustrates a planar (flat), rigid object of arbitrary shape confined to the xy plane and rotating about a fixed axis through O. The axis is perpendicular to the plane of the figure, and O is the origin of an xy coordinate system. Let us look at the motion of only one of the millions of "particles" making up this object. A particle at P is at a fixed distance r from the origin and rotates about it in a circle of radius r. (In fact, every particle on the object undergoes circular motion about O.) It is convenient to represent the position of P with its polar coordinates (r, ), where r is the distance from the origin to P and is measured counterclockwise from some preferred direction -- in this case, the positive x axis. In this representation, the only coordinate that changes in time is the angle ; r remains constant. (In cartesian coordinates, both x and y vary in time.) As the particle moves along the circle from the positive x axis ( 0) to P, it moves through an arc of length s, which is related to the angular position through the relationship s r s r (10.1a) (10.1b) P r s x O Figure 10.1 A rigid object rotating about a fixed axis through O perpendicular to the plane of the figure. (In other words, the axis of rotation is the z axis.) A particle at P rotates in a circle of radius r centered at O. It is important to note the units of in Equation 10.1b. Because is the ratio of an arc length and the radius of the circle, it is a pure number. However, we commonly give the artificial unit radian (rad), where one radian is the angle subtended by an arc length equal to the radius of the arc. Because the circumference of a circle is 2 r, it follows from Equation 10.1b that 360 corresponds to an angle of 2 r/r rad 2 rad (one revolution). Hence, 1 rad 360/2 57.3. To convert an angle in degrees to an angle in radians, we use the fact that 2 rad 360: (rad) 180 (deg) Radian For example, 60 equals /3 rad, and 45 equals /4 rad. 294 CHAPTER 10 Rotation of a Rigid Object About a Fixed Axis y Q ,tf r P, ti f i x O In a short track event, such as a 200-m or 400-m sprint, the runners begin from staggered positions on the track. Why don't they all begin from the same line? Figure 10.2 A particle on a rotating rigid object moves from P to Q along the arc of a circle. In the time interval t t f t i , the radius vector sweeps out an angle f i. As the particle in question on our rigid object travels from position P to position Q in a time t as shown in Figure 10.2, the radius vector sweeps out an angle f is defined as the angular displacement of the particle: i . This quantity f i (10.2) We define the average angular speed placement to the time interval t: Average angular speed f (omega) as the ratio of this angular disi tf ti t (10.3) is defined as In analogy to linear speed, the instantaneous angular speed the limit of the ratio / t as t approaches zero: Instantaneous angular speed lim t:0 t d dt (10.4) Angular speed has units of radians per second (rad/s), or rather second 1 (s because radians are not dimensional. We take to be positive when is increasing (counterclockwise motion) and negative when is decreasing (clockwise motion). If the instantaneous angular speed of an object changes from i to f in the time interval t, the object has an angular acceleration. The average angular acceleration (alpha) of a rotating object is defined as the ratio of the change in the angular speed to the time interval t : 1) Average angular acceleration f i tf ti t (10.5) 10.1 Angular Displacement, Velocity, and Acceleration 295 Figure 10.3 The right-hand rule for determining the direction of the angular velocity vector. In analogy to linear acceleration, the instantaneous angular acceleration is defined as the limit of the ratio / t as t approaches zero: lim t:0 t d dt (10.6) Instantaneous angular acceleration Angular acceleration has units of radians per second squared (rad/s2 ), or just second 2 (s 2 ). Note that is positive when the rate of counterclockwise rotation is increasing or when the rate of clockwise rotation is decreasing. When rotating about a fixed axis, every particle on a rigid object rotates through the same angle and has the same angular speed and the same angular acceleration. That is, the quantities , , and characterize the rotational motion of the entire rigid object. Using these quantities, we can greatly simplify the analysis of rigid-body rotation. Angular position ( ), angular speed ( ), and angular acceleration ( ) are analogous to linear position (x), linear speed (v), and linear acceleration (a). The variables , , and differ dimensionally from the variables x, v, and a only by a factor having the unit of length. We have not specified any direction for and . Strictly speaking, these variables are the magnitudes of the angular velocity and the angular acceleration vectors and , respectively, and they should always be positive. Because we are considering rotation about a fixed axis, however, we can indicate the directions of the vectors by assigning a positive or negative sign to and , as discussed earlier with regard to Equations 10.4 and 10.6. For rotation about a fixed axis, the only direction that uniquely specifies the rotational motion is the direction along the axis of rotation. Therefore, the directions of and are along this axis. If an object rotates in the xy plane as in Figure 10.1, the direction of is out of the plane of the diagram when the rotation is counterclockwise and into the plane of the diagram when the rotation is clockwise. To illustrate this convention, it is convenient to use the right-hand rule demonstrated in Figure 10.3. When the four fingers of the right hand are wrapped in the direction of rotation, the extended right thumb points in the direction of . The direction of follows from its definition d /dt. It is the same as the direction of if the angular speed is increasing in time, and it is antiparallel to if the angular speed is decreasing in time. 296 CHAPTER 10 Rotation of a Rigid Object About a Fixed Axis Quick Quiz 10.1 Describe a situation in which 0 and and are antiparallel. 10.2 ROTATIONAL KINEMATICS: ROTATIONAL MOTION WITH CONSTANT ANGULAR ACCELERATION 7.2 In our study of linear motion, we found that the simplest form of accelerated motion to analyze is motion under constant linear acceleration. Likewise, for rotational motion about a fixed axis, the simplest accelerated motion to analyze is motion under constant angular acceleration. Therefore, we next develop kinematic relationships for this type of motion. If we write Equation 10.6 in the form d dt, and let ti 0 and tf t, we can integrate this expression directly: f i t (for constant ) (10.7) Substituting Equation 10.7 into Equation 10.4 and integrating once more we obtain Rotational kinematic equations f i it 1 2 t2 (for constant ) (10.8) If we eliminate t from Equations 10.7 and 10.8, we obtain f 2 i 2 2 ( f i) (for constant ) (10.9) Notice that these kinematic expressions for rotational motion under constant angular acceleration are of the same form as those for linear motion under constant linear acceleration with the substitutions x : , v : , and a : . Table 10.1 compares the kinematic equations for rotational and linear motion. EXAMPLE 10.1 Rotating Wheel A wheel rotates with a constant angular acceleration of 3.50 rad/s2. If the angular speed of the wheel is 2.00 rad/s at ti 0, (a) through what angle does the wheel rotate in 2.00 s? We can use Figure 10.2 to represent the wheel, and so we do not need a new drawing. This is a straightforward application of an equation from Table 10.1: f i it 1 2 1 2 Solution Because the angular acceleration and the angular speed are both positive, we can be sure our answer must be greater than 2.00 rad/s. f i Solution t 2.00 rad/s (3.50 rad/s2)(2.00 s) 9.00 rad/s We could also obtain this result using Equation 10.9 and the results of part (a). Try it! You also may want to see if you can formulate the linear motion analog to this problem. t2 (2.00 rad/s)(2.00 s) (3.50 rad/s2)(2.00 s)2 (11.0 rad)(57.3/rad) 1.75 rev 630 11.0 rad 630 360/rev Exercise between t Find the angle through which the wheel rotates 2.00 s and t 3.00 s. 10.8 rad. Answer 2.00 s? (b) What is the angular speed at t 10.3 Angular and Linear Quantities 297 TABLE 10.1 Kinematic Equations for Rotational and Linear Motion Under Constant Acceleration Rotational Motion About a Fixed Axis f f 2 i i 2 i Linear Motion vf xf vi xi vi 2 t it 2 ( 1 2 f t2 i) at vit 2a(xf 1 2 at 2 xi ) f vf 2 10.3 ANGULAR AND LINEAR QUANTITIES y v P r In this section we derive some useful relationships between the angular speed and acceleration of a rotating rigid object and the linear speed and acceleration of an arbitrary point in the object. To do so, we must keep in mind that when a rigid object rotates about a fixed axis, as in Figure 10.4, every particle of the object moves in a circle whose center is the axis of rotation. We can relate the angular speed of the rotating object to the tangential speed of a point P on the object. Because point P moves in a circle, the linear velocity vector v is always tangent to the circular path and hence is called tangential velocity. The magnitude of the tangential velocity of the point P is by definition the tangential speed v ds/dt, where s is the distance traveled by this point measured along the circular path. Recalling that s r (Eq. 10.1a) and noting that r is constant, we obtain v Because d /dt ds dt r d dt O x Figure 10.4 As a rigid object rotates about the fixed axis through O, the point P has a linear velocity v that is always tangent to the circular path of radius r. (see Eq. 10.4), we can say v r (10.10) Relationship between linear and angular speed That is, the tangential speed of a point on a rotating rigid object equals the perpendicular distance of that point from the axis of rotation multiplied by the angular speed. Therefore, although every point on the rigid object has the same angular speed, not every point has the same linear speed because r is not the same for all points on the object. Equation 10.10 shows that the linear speed of a point on the rotating object increases as one moves outward from the center of rotation, as we would intuitively expect. The outer end of a swinging baseball bat moves much faster than the handle. We can relate the angular acceleration of the rotating rigid object to the tangential acceleration of the point P by taking the time derivative of v: at at dv dt r r d dt (10.11) QuickLab Spin a tennis ball or basketball and watch it gradually slow down and stop. Estimate and at as accurately as you can. Relationship between linear and angular acceleration That is, the tangential component of the linear acceleration of a point on a rotating rigid object equals the point's distance from the axis of rotation multiplied by the angular acceleration. 298 CHAPTER 10 Rotation of a Rigid Object About a Fixed Axis y at a ar x P In Section 4.4 we found that a point rotating in a circular path undergoes a centripetal, or radial, acceleration ar of magnitude v 2/r directed toward the center of rotation (Fig. 10.5). Because v r for a point P on a rotating object, we can express the radial acceleration of that point as ar v2 r r 2 (10.12) O The total linear acceleration vector of the point is a at ar . (at describes the change in how fast the point is moving, and ar represents the change in its direction of travel.) Because a is a vector having a radial and a tangential component, the magnitude of a for the point P on the rotating rigid object is a a t 2 a r2 r 2 2 r2 4 r 2 4 (10.13) As a rigid object rotates about a fixed axis through O, the point P experiences a tangential component of linear acceleration at and a radial component of linear acceleration ar . The total linear acceleration of this point is a a t ar . Figure 10.5 Quick Quiz 10.2 When a wheel of radius R rotates about a fixed axis, do all points on the wheel have (a) the same angular speed and (b) the same linear speed? If the angular speed is constant and equal to , describe the linear speeds and linear accelerations of the points located at (c) r 0, (d) r R/2, and (e) r R, all measured from the center of the wheel. EXAMPLE 10.2 CD Player 1 (56.5 rad/s) 2 rev/rad (60 s/min) 5.4 10 2 rev/min On a compact disc, audio information is stored in a series of pits and flat areas on the surface of the disc. The information is stored digitally, and the alternations between pits and flat areas on the surface represent binary ones and zeroes to be read by the compact disc player and converted back to sound waves. The pits and flat areas are detected by a system consisting of a laser and lenses. The length of a certain number of ones and zeroes is the same everywhere on the disc, whether the information is near the center of the disc or near its outer edge. In order that this length of ones and zeroes always passes by the laser lens system in the same time period, the linear speed of the disc surface at the location of the lens must be constant. This requires, according to Equation 10.10, that the angular speed vary as the laser lens system moves radially along the disc. In a typical compact disc player, the disc spins counterclockwise (Fig. 10.6), and the constant speed of the surface at the point of the laser lens system is 1.3 m/s. (a) Find the angular speed of the disc in revolutions per minute when information is being read from the innermost first track (r 23 mm) and the outermost final track (r 58 mm). 23 mm 58 mm Solution Using Equation 10.10, we can find the angular speed; this will give us the required linear speed at the position of the inner track, i v ri 1.3 m/s 2.3 10 2 m 56.5 rad/s Figure 10.6 A compact disc. 10.4 Rotational Energy For the outer track, f 299 v rf 2.1 1.3 m/s 5.8 10 2 m 10 2 rev/min (c) What total length of track moves past the objective lens during this time? 22.4 rad/s Solution Because we know the (constant) linear velocity and the time interval, this is a straightforward calculation: xf v it (1.3 m/s)(4 473 s) 5.8 10 3 m The player adjusts the angular speed of the disc within this range so that information moves past the objective lens at a constant rate. These angular velocity values are positive because the direction of rotation is counterclockwise. (b) The maximum playing time of a standard music CD is 74 minutes and 33 seconds. How many revolutions does the disc make during that time? More than 3.6 miles of track spins past the objective lens! (d) What is the angular acceleration of the CD over the 4 473-s time interval? Assume that is constant. Solution We know that the angular speed is always decreasing, and we assume that it is decreasing steadily, with constant. The time interval t is (74 min)(60 s/min) 33 s 4 473 s. We are looking for the angular position f , where we set the initial angular position i 0. We can use Equation 10.3, replacing the average angular speed with its mathematical equivalent ( i f )/2: f i Solution We have several choices for approaching this problem. Let us use the most direct approach by utilizing Equation 10.5, which is based on the definition of the term we are seeking. We should obtain a negative number for the angular acceleration because the disc spins more and more slowly in the positive direction as time goes on. Our answer should also be fairly small because it takes such a long time -- more than an hour -- for the change in angular speed to be accomplished: f i 0 1 2( i 1 2 (540 f )t rev/min 210 rev/min) t 7.6 10 22.4 rad/s 56.5 rad/s 4 473 s 3 (1 min/60 s)(4 473 s) 2.8 10 4 rev rad/s2 The disc experiences a very gradual decrease in its rotation rate, as expected. web 10.4 7.3 ROTATIONAL ENERGY Let us now look at the kinetic energy of a rotating rigid object, considering the object as a collection of particles and assuming it rotates about a fixed z axis with an angular speed (Fig. 10.7). Each particle has kinetic energy determined by its mass and linear speed. If the mass of the ith particle is mi and its linear speed is vi , its kinetic energy is Ki 1 2 2 m iv i If you want to learn more about the physics of CD players, visit the Special Interest Group on CD Applications and Technology at www.sigcat.org y vi mi ri To proceed further, we must recall that although every particle in the rigid object has the same angular speed , the individual linear speeds depend on the distance ri from the axis of rotation according to the expression vi ri (see Eq. 10.10). The total kinetic energy of the rotating rigid object is the sum of the kinetic energies of the individual particles: KR i O x Ki i 1 2 2m i v i 1 2 mi ri2 i 2 We can write this expression in the form KR where we have factored 2 1 2 m i ri 2 i 2 (10.14) from the sum because it is common to every particle. Figure 10.7 A rigid object rotating about a z axis with angular speed . The kinetic energy of the particle of mass mi is 1 m iv i 2. 2 The total kinetic energy of the object is called its rotational kinetic energy. 300 CHAPTER 10 Rotation of a Rigid Object About a Fixed Axis We simplify this expression by defining the quantity in parentheses as the moment of inertia I: Moment of inertia I i mi ri 2 (10.15) From the definition of moment of inertia, we see that it has dimensions of ML2 (kg m2 in SI units).1 With this notation, Equation 10.14 becomes Rotational kinetic energy KR 1 2 2I (10.16) 1 Although we commonly refer to the quantity 2I 2 as rotational kinetic energy, it is not a new form of energy. It is ordinary kinetic energy because it is derived from a sum over individual kinetic energies of the particles contained in the rigid object. However, the mathematical form of the kinetic energy given by Equation 10.16 is a convenient one when we are dealing with rotational motion, provided we know how to calculate I. It is important that you recognize the analogy between kinetic energy associated with linear motion 1mv 2 and rotational kinetic energy 1 I 2. The quantities I 2 2 and in rotational motion are analogous to m and v in linear motion, respectively. (In fact, I takes the place of m every time we compare a linear-motion equation with its rotational counterpart.) The moment of inertia is a measure of the resistance of an object to changes in its rotational motion, just as mass is a measure of the tendency of an object to resist changes in its linear motion. Note, however, that mass is an intrinsic property of an object, whereas I depends on the physical arrangement of that mass. Can you think of a situation in which an object's moment of inertia changes even though its mass does not? EXAMPLE 10.3 The Oxygen Molecule 1.95 10 46 Consider an oxygen molecule (O2 ) rotating in the xy plane about the z axis. The axis passes through the center of the molecule, perpendicular to its length. The mass of each oxygen atom is 2.66 10 26 kg, and at room temperature the average separation between the two atoms is d 1.21 10 10 m (the atoms are treated as point masses). (a) Calculate the moment of inertia of the molecule about the z axis. kg m2 This is a very small number, consistent with the minuscule masses and distances involved. (b) If the angular speed of the molecule about the z axis is 4.60 1012 rad/s, what is its rotational kinetic energy? Solution This is a straightforward application of the definition of I. Because each atom is a distance d/2 from the z axis, the moment of inertia about the axis is I i 1 2 (2.66 Solution We apply the result we just calculated for the moment of inertia in the formula for K R : KR 1 2 2I 1 2 (1.95 mi ri 2 m 10 d 2 26 2 m d 2 2 1 2 2 md 10 10 10 46 21 kg m2)(4.60 J 1012 rad/s)2 kg)(1.21 10 m)2 2.06 1 Civil engineers use moment of inertia to characterize the elastic properties (rigidity) of such structures as loaded beams. Hence, it is often useful even in a nonrotational context. 10.5 Calculation of Moments of Inertia 301 EXAMPLE 10.4 Four Rotating Masses Therefore, the rotational kinetic energy about the y axis is KR 1 2 Iy 2 1 2 2 (2Ma ) 2 Four tiny spheres are fastened to the corners of a frame of negligible mass lying in the xy plane (Fig. 10.8). We shall assume that the spheres' radii are small compared with the dimensions of the frame. (a) If the system rotates about the y axis with an angular speed , find the moment of inertia and the rotational kinetic energy about this axis. Ma 2 2 Solution First, note that the two spheres of mass m, which lie on the y axis, do not contribute to Iy (that is, ri 0 for these spheres about this axis). Applying Equation 10.15, we obtain Iy i The fact that the two spheres of mass m do not enter into this result makes sense because they have no motion about the axis of rotation; hence, they have no rotational kinetic energy. By similar logic, we expect the moment of inertia about the x axis to be Ix 2mb 2 with a rotational kinetic energy about that axis of K R mb 2 2. (b) Suppose the system rotates in the xy plane about an axis through O (the z axis). Calculate the moment of inertia and rotational kinetic energy about this axis. m i ri 2 Ma 2 Ma 2 2Ma 2 y m Solution Iz i Because ri in Equation 10.15 is the perpendicular distance to the axis of rotation, we obtain mi ri 2 1 2 Iz 2 Ma 2 1 2 2 (2Ma Ma 2 mb 2 2 mb 2 (Ma 2 2Ma 2 mb 2) 2 2mb 2 b M a O b a M KR x 2mb 2) m Figure 10.8 The four spheres are at a fixed separation as shown. The moment of inertia of the system depends on the axis about which it is evaluated. Comparing the results for parts (a) and (b), we conclude that the moment of inertia and therefore the rotational kinetic energy associated with a given angular speed depend on the axis of rotation. In part (b), we expect the result to include all four spheres and distances because all four spheres are rotating in the xy plane. Furthermore, the fact that the rotational kinetic energy in part (a) is smaller than that in part (b) indicates that it would take less effort (work) to set the system into rotation about the y axis than about the z axis. 10.5 7.5 CALCULATION OF MOMENTS OF INERTIA We can evaluate the moment of inertia of an extended rigid object by imagining the object divided into many small volume elements, each of which has mass m. r i 2 m i and take the limit of this sum as m : 0. In We use the definition I i this limit, the sum becomes an integral over the whole object: I lim ri 2 mi r 2 dm (10.17) m i :0 i It is usually easier to calculate moments of inertia in terms of the volume of the elements rather than their mass, and we can easily make that change by using m/V, where is the density of the object and V is its volume. We Equation 1.1, want this expression in its differential form dm/dV because the volumes we are dealing with are very small. Solving for dm dV and substituting the result 302 CHAPTER 10 Rotation of a Rigid Object About a Fixed Axis into Equation 10.17 gives I r 2 dV If the object is homogeneous, then is constant and the integral can be evaluated for a known geometry. If is not constant, then its variation with position must be known to complete the integration. The density given by m/V sometimes is referred to as volume density for the obvious reason that it relates to volume. Often we use other ways of expressing density. For instance, when dealing with a sheet of uniform thickness t, we can define a surface density t, which signifies mass per unit area. Finally, when mass is distributed along a uniform rod of cross-sectional area A, we sometimes use linear density M/L A, which is the mass per unit length. EXAMPLE 10.5 Uniform Hoop y Find the moment of inertia of a uniform hoop of mass M and radius R about an axis perpendicular to the plane of the hoop and passing through its center (Fig. 10.9). dm Solution All mass elements dm are the same distance r R from the axis, and so, applying Equation 10.17, we obtain for the moment of inertia about the z axis through O: Iz r 2 dm R2 dm MR 2 O x R Note that this moment of inertia is the same as that of a single particle of mass M located a distance R from the axis of rotation. Figure 10.9 The mass elements dm of a uniform hoop are all the same distance from O. Quick Quiz 10.3 (a) Based on what you have learned from Example 10.5, what do you expect to find for the moment of inertia of two particles, each of mass M/2, located anywhere on a circle of radius R around the axis of rotation? (b) How about the moment of inertia of four particles, each of mass M/4, again located a distance R from the rotation axis? EXAMPLE 10.6 Uniform Rigid Rod Substituting this expression for dm into Equation 10.17, with r x, we obtain L/2 Calculate the moment of inertia of a uniform rigid rod of length L and mass M (Fig. 10.10) about an axis perpendicular to the rod (the y axis) and passing through its center of mass. Iy r 2 dm L/2 x2 L/2 L/2 M dx L M L L/2 x 2 dx L/2 Solution The shaded length element dx has a mass dm equal to the mass per unit length multiplied by dx : dm dx M dx L M L x3 3 1 2 12 ML 10.5 Calculation of Moments of Inertia y y 303 dx x O x Figure 10.10 L A uniform rigid rod of length L. The moment of inertia about the y axis is less than that about the y axis. The latter axis is examined in Example 10.8. EXAMPLE 10.7 Uniform Solid Cylinder cylindrical shells, each of which has radius r, thickness dr, and length L, as shown in Figure 10.11. The volume dV of each shell is its cross-sectional area multiplied by its length: dV dA L (2 r dr)L. If the mass per unit volume is , then the mass of this differential volume element is dm dV 2 rL dr. Substituting this expression for dm into Equation 10.17, we obtain R A uniform solid cylinder has a radius R, mass M, and length L. Calculate its moment of inertia about its central axis (the z axis in Fig. 10.11). Solution It is convenient to divide the cylinder into many z dr r R L Iz r 2 dm 2 L 0 r 3 dr 1 2 LR 4 Because the total volume of the cylinder is R 2L, we see that M/V M/ R 2L. Substituting this value for into the above result gives (1) Iz 1 2 2 MR Figure 10.11 cylinder. Calculating I about the z axis for a uniform solid Note that this result does not depend on L, the length of the cylinder. In other words, it applies equally well to a long cylinder and a flat disc. Also note that this is exactly half the value we would expect were all the mass concentrated at the outer edge of the cylinder or disc. (See Example 10.5.) Table 10.2 gives the moments of inertia for a number of bodies about specific axes. The moments of inertia of rigid bodies with simple geometry (high symmetry) are relatively easy to calculate provided the rotation axis coincides with an axis of symmetry. The calculation of moments of inertia about an arbitrary axis can be cumbersome, however, even for a highly symmetric object. Fortunately, use of an important theorem, called the parallel-axis theorem, often simplifies the calculation. Suppose the moment of inertia about an axis through the center of mass of an object is ICM . The parallel-axis theorem states that the moment of inertia about any axis parallel to and a distance D away from this axis is I ICM MD 2 (10.18) Parallel-axis theorem 304 CHAPTER 10 Rotation of a Rigid Object About a Fixed Axis TABLE 10.2 Moments of Inertia of Homogeneous Rigid Bodies with Different Geometries Hoop or cylindrical shell I CM = MR 2 Hollow cylinder R I CM = 1 M(R 12 + R 22) 2 R1 R2 Solid cylinder or disk I CM = 1 MR 2 2 R Rectangular plate I CM = 1 M(a 2 + b 2) 12 b a Long thin rod with rotation axis through center I CM = 1 ML 2 12 L Long thin rod with rotation axis through end I = 1 ML 2 3 L Solid sphere I CM = 2 MR 2 5 R Thin spherical shell I CM = 2 MR 2 3 R Proof of the Parallel-Axis Theorem (Optional). Suppose that an object rotates in the xy plane about the z axis, as shown in Figure 10.12, and that the coordinates of the center of mass are x CM , y CM . Let the mass element dm have coordinates x, y. Because this element is a distance r x 2 y 2 from the z axis, the moment of inertia about the z axis is I r 2 dm (x 2 y 2) dm However, we can relate the coordinates x, y of the mass element dm to the coordinates of this same element located in a coordinate system having the object's center of mass as its origin. If the coordinates of the center of mass are x CM , y CM in the original coordinate system centered on O, then from Figure 10.12a we see that the relationships between the unprimed and primed coordinates are x x x CM 10.5 Calculation of Moments of Inertia 305 y dm x, y z Axis through CM y CM xCM, yCM yCM O xCM x x O D x x CM y y r Rotation axis (a) (b) (a) The parallel-axis theorem: If the moment of inertia about an axis perpendicular to the figure through the center of mass is ICM , then the moment of inertia about the z axis is Iz I CM MD 2. (b) Perspective drawing showing the z axis (the axis of rotation) and the parallel axis through the CM. Figure 10.12 and y I y [(x [(x )2 y CM . Therefore, x CM)2 (y y CM)2] dm 2x CM x dm 2y CM y dm (x CM2 y CM 2) dm (y )2] dm The first integral is, by definition, the moment of inertia about an axis that is parallel to the z axis and passes through the center of mass. The second two integrals are zero because, by definition of the center of mass, x dm y dm 0. The last integral is simply MD 2 because dm M and D 2 x CM2 y CM2. Therefore, we conclude that I ICM MD 2 EXAMPLE 10.8 Applying the Parallel-Axis Theorem I ICM MD 2 1 12 Consider once again the uniform rigid rod of mass M and length L shown in Figure 10.10. Find the moment of inertia of the rod about an axis perpendicular to the rod through one end (the y axis in Fig. 10.10). ML 2 M L 2 2 1 3 ML 2 Solution Intuitively, we expect the moment of inertia to 1 be greater than ICM 12ML 2 because it should be more difficult to change the rotational motion of a rod spinning about an axis at one end than one that is spinning about its center. Because the distance between the center-of-mass axis and the y axis is D L/2, the parallel-axis theorem gives So, it is four times more difficult to change the rotation of a rod spinning about its end than it is to change the motion of one spinning about its center. Exercise Answer Calculate the moment of inertia of the rod about a perpendicular axis through the point x L/4. I 7 48 ML 2. 306 CHAPTER 10 Rotation of a Rigid Object About a Fixed Axis 10.6 7.6 TORQUE Why are a door's doorknob and hinges placed near opposite edges of the door? This question actually has an answer based on common sense ideas. The harder we push against the door and the farther we are from the hinges, the more likely we are to open or close the door. When a force is exerted on a rigid object pivoted about an axis, the object tends to rotate about that axis. The tendency of a force to rotate an object about some axis is measured by a vector quantity called torque (tau). Consider the wrench pivoted on the axis through O in Figure 10.13. The applied force F acts at an angle to the horizontal. We define the magnitude of the torque associated with the force F by the expression r F sin Fd (10.19) Definition of torque Moment arm where r is the distance between the pivot point and the point of application of F and d is the perpendicular distance from the pivot point to the line of action of F. (The line of action of a force is an imaginary line extending out both ends of the vector representing the force. The dashed line extending from the tail of F in Figure 10.13 is part of the line of action of F.) From the right triangle in Figure 10.13 that has the wrench as its hypotenuse, we see that d r sin . This quantity d is called the moment arm (or lever arm) of F. It is very important that you recognize that torque is defined only when a reference axis is specified. Torque is the product of a force and the moment arm of that force, and moment arm is defined only in terms of an axis of rotation. In Figure 10.13, the only component of F that tends to cause rotation is F sin , the component perpendicular to r. The horizontal component F cos , because it passes through O, has no tendency to produce rotation. From the definition of torque, we see that the rotating tendency increases as F increases and as d increases. This explains the observation that it is easier to close a door if we push at the doorknob rather than at a point close to the hinge. We also want to apply our push as close to perpendicular to the door as we can. Pushing sideways on the doorknob will not cause the door to rotate. If two or more forces are acting on a rigid object, as shown in Figure 10.14, each tends to produce rotation about the pivot at O. In this example, F2 tends to F1 F sin r F d1 O d F cos Line of action O d2 Figure 10.13 The force F has a greater rotating tendency about O as F increases and as the moment arm d increases. It is the component F sin that tends to rotate the wrench about O. F2 Figure 10.14 The force F1 tends to rotate the object counterclockwise about O, and F2 tends to rotate it clockwise. 10.7 Relationship Between Torque and Angular Acceleration 307 rotate the object clockwise, and F1 tends to rotate it counterclockwise. We use the convention that the sign of the torque resulting from a force is positive if the turning tendency of the force is counterclockwise and is negative if the turning tendency is clockwise. For example, in Figure 10.14, the torque resulting from F1 , which has a moment arm d 1 , is positive and equal to F1 d 1 ; the torque from F2 is negative and equal to F2 d 2 . Hence, the net torque about O is 1 2 F 1d 1 F 2d 2 Torque should not be confused with force. Forces can cause a change in linear motion, as described by Newton's second law. Forces can also cause a change in rotational motion, but the effectiveness of the forces in causing this change depends on both the forces and the moment arms of the forces, in the combination that we call torque. Torque has units of force times length -- newton meters in SI units -- and should be reported in these units. Do not confuse torque and work, which have the same units but are very different concepts. EXAMPLE 10.9 The Net Torque on a Cylinder A one-piece cylinder is shaped as shown in Figure 10.15, with a core section protruding from the larger drum. The cylinder is free to rotate around the central axis shown in the drawing. A rope wrapped around the drum, which has radius R 1 , exerts a force F1 to the right on the cylinder. A rope wrapped around the core, which has radius R 2 , exerts a force F2 downward on the cylinder. (a) What is the net torque acting on the cylinder about the rotation axis (which is the z axis in Figure 10.15)? y Solution The torque due to F1 is R 1 F1 (the sign is negative because the torque tends to produce clockwise rotation). The torque due to F2 is R 2 F 2 (the sign is positive because the torque tends to produce counterclockwise rotation). Therefore, the net torque about the rotation axis is 1 2 R 1F 1 R 2F 2 F1 We can make a quick check by noting that if the two forces are of equal magnitude, the net torque is negative because R 1 R 2 . Starting from rest with both forces acting on it, the cylinder would rotate clockwise because F 1 would be more effective at turning it than would F 2 . (b) Suppose F 1 5.0 N, R 1 1.0 m, F 2 15.0 N, and R 2 0.50 m. What is the net torque about the rotation axis, and which way does the cylinder rotate from rest? (5.0 N)(1.0 m) (15.0 N)(0.50 m) 2.5 N m R1 R2 O x z F2 Figure 10.15 A solid cylinder pivoted about the z axis through O. The moment arm of F1 is R 1 , and the moment arm of F2 is R 2 . Because the net torque is positive, if the cylinder starts from rest, it will commence rotating counterclockwise with increasing angular velocity. (If the cylinder's initial rotation is clockwise, it will slow to a stop and then rotate counterclockwise with increasing angular speed.) 10.7 RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN TORQUE AND ANGULAR ACCELERATION 7.6 In this section we show that the angular acceleration of a rigid object rotating about a fixed axis is proportional to the net torque acting about that axis. Before discussing the more complex case of rigid-body rotation, however, it is instructive 308 CHAPTER 10 Rotation of a Rigid Object About a Fixed Axis first to discuss the case of a particle rotating about some fixed point under the influence of an external force. Consider a particle of mass m rotating in a circle of radius r under the influence of a tangential force Ft and a radial force Fr , as shown in Figure 10.16. (As we learned in Chapter 6, the radial force must be present to keep the particle moving in its circular path.) The tangential force provides a tangential acceleration at , and Ft ma t The torque about the center of the circle due to Ft is Figure 10.16 A particle rotating in a circle under the influence of a tangential force Ft . A force Fr in the radial direction also must be present to maintain the circular motion. Ft r (ma t )r Because the tangential acceleration is related to the angular acceleration through the relationship at r (see Eq. 10.11), the torque can be expressed as (mr )r (mr 2) Recall from Equation 10.15 that mr 2 is the moment of inertia of the rotating particle about the z axis passing through the origin, so that Relationship between torque and angular acceleration I (10.20) y d Ft dm That is, the torque acting on the particle is proportional to its angular acceleration, and the proportionality constant is the moment of inertia. It is important to note that I is the rotational analog of Newton's second law of motion, F ma. Now let us extend this discussion to a rigid object of arbitrary shape rotating about a fixed axis, as shown in Figure 10.17. The object can be regarded as an infinite number of mass elements dm of infinitesimal size. If we impose a cartesian coordinate system on the object, then each mass element rotates in a circle about the origin, and each has a tangential acceleration at produced by an external tangential force dFt . For any given element, we know from Newton's second law that dFt (dm)a t (r dm)a t (r 2 dm) The torque d associated with the force dFt acts about the origin and is given by x r O d Because at r dF t r , the expression for d becomes d (r dm)r A rigid object rotating about an axis through O. Each mass element dm rotates about O with the same angular acceleration , and the net torque on the object is proportional to . Figure 10.17 It is important to recognize that although each mass element of the rigid object may have a different linear acceleration at , they all have the same angular acceleration . With this in mind, we can integrate the above expression to obtain the net torque about O due to the external forces: (r 2 dm) r 2 dm where can be taken outside the integral because it is common to all mass elements. From Equation 10.17, we know that r 2 dm is the moment of inertia of the object about the rotation axis through O, and so the expression for becomes Torque is proportional to angular acceleration I (10.21) Note that this is the same relationship we found for a particle rotating in a circle (see Eq. 10.20). So, again we see that the net torque about the rotation axis is pro- 10.7 Relationship Between Torque and Angular Acceleration 309 portional to the angular acceleration of the object, with the proportionality factor being I, a quantity that depends upon the axis of rotation and upon the size and shape of the object. In view of the complex nature of the system, it is interesting to note that the relationship I is strikingly simple and in complete agreement with experimental observations. The simplicity of the result lies in the manner in which the motion is described. Although each point on a rigid object rotating about a fixed axis may not experience the same force, linear acceleration, or linear speed, each point experiences the same angular acceleration and angular speed at any instant. Therefore, at any instant the rotating rigid object as a whole is characterized by specific values for angular acceleration, net torque, and angular speed. Every point has the same and QuickLab Tip over a child's tall tower of blocks. Try this several times. Does the tower "break" at the same place each time? What affects where the tower comes apart as it tips? If the tower were made of toy bricks that snap together, what would happen? (Refer to Conceptual Example 10.11.) Finally, note that the result I also applies when the forces acting on the mass elements have radial components as well as tangential components. This is because the line of action of all radial components must pass through the axis of rotation, and hence all radial components produce zero torque about that axis. EXAMPLE 10.10 Rotating Rod compute the torque on the rod, we can assume that the gravitational force acts at the center of mass of the rod, as shown in Figure 10.18. The torque due to this force about an axis through the pivot is g With I , and I Table 10.2), we obtain 1 2 3 ML A uniform rod of length L and mass M is attached at one end to a frictionless pivot and is free to rotate about the pivot in the vertical plane, as shown in Figure 10.18. The rod is released from rest in the horizontal position. What is the initial angular acceleration of the rod and the initial linear acceleration of its right end? We cannot use our kinematic equations to find or a because the torque exerted on the rod varies with its position, and so neither acceleration is constant. We have enough information to find the torque, however, which we can then use in the torque angular acceleration relationship (Eq. 10.21) to find and then a. The only force contributing to torque about an axis through the pivot is the gravitational force Mg exerted on the rod. (The force exerted by the pivot on the rod has zero torque about the pivot because its moment arm is zero.) To L 2 Solution for this axis of rotation (see g (L/2) I 13 L2 3g 2L All points on the rod have this angular acceleration. To find the linear acceleration of the right end of the rod, we use the relationship a t r (Eq. 10.11), with r L: at L 3 2g L/2 Pivot Mg Figure 10.18 The uniform rod is pivoted at the left end. This result -- that at g for the free end of the rod -- is rather interesting. It means that if we place a coin at the tip of the rod, hold the rod in the horizontal position, and then release the rod, the tip of the rod falls faster than the coin does! Other points on the rod have a linear acceleration that is less than 3 g. For example, the middle of the rod has 2 an acceleration of 3 g. 4 310 CHAPTER 10 Rotation of a Rigid Object About a Fixed Axis CONCEPTUAL EXAMPLE 10.11 Falling Smokestacks and Tumbling Blocks When a tall smokestack falls over, it often breaks somewhere along its length before it hits the ground, as shown in Figure 10.19. The same thing happens with a tall tower of children's toy blocks. Why does this happen? Solution As the smokestack rotates around its base, each higher portion of the smokestack falls with an increasing tangential acceleration. (The tangential acceleration of a given point on the smokestack is proportional to the distance of that portion from the base.) As the acceleration increases, higher portions of the smokestack experience an acceleration greater than that which could result from gravity alone; this is similar to the situation described in Example 10.10. This can happen only if these portions are being pulled downward by a force in addition to the gravitational force. The force that causes this to occur is the shear force from lower portions of the smokestack. Eventually the shear force that provides this acceleration is greater than the smokestack can withstand, and the smokestack breaks. Figure 10.19 A falling smokestack. EXAMPLE 10.12 Angular Acceleration of a Wheel M A wheel of radius R, mass M, and moment of inertia I is mounted on a frictionless, horizontal axle, as shown in Figure 10.20. A light cord wrapped around the wheel supports an object of mass m. Calculate the angular acceleration of the wheel, the linear acceleration of the object, and the tension in the cord. O R Solution The torque acting on the wheel about its axis of rotation is TR, where T is the force exerted by the cord on the rim of the wheel. (The gravitational force exerted by the Earth on the wheel and the normal force exerted by the axle on the wheel both pass through the axis of rotation and thus produce no torque.) Because I , we obtain I (1) TR I TR T T Now let us apply Newton's second law to the motion of the object, taking the downward direction to be positive: Fy (2) a mg mg m mg m T T ma Equations (1) and (2) have three unknowns, , a, and T. Because the object and wheel are connected by a string that does not slip, the linear acceleration of the suspended object is equal to the linear acceleration of a point on the rim of the Figure 10.20 The tension in the cord produces a torque about the axle passing through O. 10.7 Relationship Between Torque and Angular Acceleration wheel. Therefore, the angular acceleration of the wheel and this linear acceleration are related by a R . Using this fact together with Equations (1) and (2), we obtain (3) a R TR 2 I mg 1 mR 2 I mg m 311 a 1 a R g I/mR 2 g I/mR R (4) T Exercise The wheel in Figure 10.20 is a solid disk of M 2.00 kg, R 30.0 cm, and I 0.090 0 kg m2. The suspended object has a mass of m 0.500 kg. Find the tension in the cord and the angular acceleration of the wheel. 3.27 N; 10.9 rad/s2. Substituting Equation (4) into Equation (2), and solving for a and , we find that Answer EXAMPLE 10.13 Atwood's Machine Revisited Substituting Equation (6) into Equation (5), we have [(m 1 Because m 2)g (m 1 m 2)a]R 2I Two blocks having masses m1 and m 2 are connected to each other by a light cord that passes over two identical, frictionless pulleys, each having a moment of inertia I and radius R, as shown in Figure 10.21a. Find the acceleration of each block and the tensions T1 , T2 , and T3 in the cord. (Assume no slipping between cord and pulleys.) a/R, this expression can be simplified to (m 1 m 2)g (m 1 (m 1 m1 m2 m 2)a m 2)g 2 I R2 2I a R2 Solution We shall define the downward direction as positive for m 1 and upward as the positive direction for m 2 . This allows us to represent the acceleration of both masses by a single variable a and also enables us to relate a positive a to a positive (counterclockwise) angular acceleration . Let us write Newton's second law of motion for each block, using the free-body diagrams for the two blocks as shown in Figure 10.21b: (1) m 1g T1 m 1a (2) T3 m 2g m 2a Next, we must include the effect of the pulleys on the motion. Free-body diagrams for the pulleys are shown in Figure 10.21c. The net torque about the axle for the pulley on the left is (T1 T2 )R, while the net torque for the pulley on the right is (T2 T3 )R. Using the relation I for each pulley and noting that each pulley has the same angular acceleration , we obtain (3) (4) (T1 (T2 T2)R T3)R I I (7) a This value of a can then be substituted into Equations (1) T2 T1 T1 m1 + (a) (b) T3 + m2 m1g m2g m1 T3 m2 n1 T2 T2 n2 We now have four equations with four unknowns: a, T1 , T2 , and T3 . These can be solved simultaneously. Adding Equations (3) and (4) gives (5) (T1 m 1g T1 T3)R m 2g T3 2I T1 mpg (c) mpg T3 Adding Equations (1) and (2) gives T3 T1 (6) (m 1 (m 1 m 2)a m 2)g (m 1 m 2)a Figure 10.21 (a) Another look at Atwood's machine. (b) Free-body diagrams for the blocks. (c) Free-body diagrams for the pulleys, where m p g represents the force of gravity acting on each pulley. 312 CHAPTER 10 Rotation of a Rigid Object About a Fixed Axis pulleys accelerate counterclockwise. If m 1 m 2 , then all the values are negative and the motions are reversed. If m 1 m 2 , then no acceleration occurs at all. You should compare these results with those found in Example 5.9 on page 129. and (2) to give T1 and T3 . Finally, T2 can be found from Equation (3) or Equation (4). Note that if m 1 m 2 , the acceleration is positive; this means that the left block accelerates downward, the right block accelerates upward, and both 10.8 F WORK, POWER, AND ENERGY IN ROTATIONAL MOTION ds d O r P In this section, we consider the relationship between the torque acting on a rigid object and its resulting rotational motion in order to generate expressions for the power and a rotational analog to the work kinetic energy theorem. Consider the rigid object pivoted at O in Figure 10.22. Suppose a single external force F is applied at P, where F lies in the plane of the page. The work done by F as the object rotates through an infinitesimal distance ds r d in a time dt is dW F ds (F sin )r d Figure 10.22 A rigid object rotates about an axis through O under the action of an external force F applied at P. where F sin is the tangential component of F, or, in other words, the component of the force along the displacement. Note that the radial component of F does no work because it is perpendicular to the displacement. Because the magnitude of the torque due to F about O is defined as rF sin by Equation 10.19, we can write the work done for the infinitesimal rotation as dW d (10.22) The rate at which work is being done by F as the object rotates about the fixed axis is dW dt d dt Because dW/dt is the instantaneous power (see Section 7.5) delivered by the force, and because d /dt , this expression reduces to Power delivered to a rigid object dW dt (10.23) Fv in the case of linear motion, and the exThis expression is analogous to pression dW d is analogous to dW Fx dx. Work and Energy in Rotational Motion In studying linear motion, we found the energy concept -- and, in particular, the work kinetic energy theorem -- extremely useful in describing the motion of a system. The energy concept can be equally useful in describing rotational motion. From what we learned of linear motion, we expect that when a symmetric object rotates about a fixed axis, the work done by external forces equals the change in the rotational energy. To show that this is in fact the case, let us begin with I . Using the chain rule from the calculus, we can express the resultant torque as I I d dt I d d d dt I d d 10.8 Work, Power, and Energy in Rotational Motion 313 TABLE 10.3 Useful Equations in Rotational and Linear Motion Rotational Motion About a Fixed Axis Angular speed d /dt Angular acceleration d /dt Resultant torque I If constant f f f f Linear Motion Linear speed v dx/dt Linear acceleration a dv/dt Resultant force F ma 1 2 i i 2 i 2 t t i t2 f i) If a constant vf xf vf 2 xf vi xi vi2 at vit 1 2 at 2 xi ) 2 ( 2a(xf Work W i d 1 2 2I Work W xi Fx dx Rotational kinetic energy K R Power Angular momentum L I Resultant torque dL/dt Kinetic energy K 1mv 2 2 Power Fv Linear momentum p mv Resultant force F dp/dt Rearranging this expression and noting that d dW d I d dW, we obtain Integrating this expression, we get for the total work done by the net external force acting on a rotating system f f W i d i I d i 1 2 2I f f 1 2 2I i (10.24) Work kinetic energy theorem for rotational motion where the angular speed changes from from i to f . That is, to as the angular position changes the net work done by external forces in rotating a symmetric rigid object about a fixed axis equals the change in the object's rotational energy. Table 10.3 lists the various equations we have discussed pertaining to rotational motion, together with the analogous expressions for linear motion. The last two equations in Table 10.3, involving angular momentum L, are discussed in Chapter 11 and are included here only for the sake of completeness. Quick Quiz 10.4 For a hoop lying in the xy plane, which of the following requires that more work be done by an external agent to accelerate the hoop from rest to an angular speed : (a) rotation about the z axis through the center of the hoop, or (b) rotation about an axis parallel to z passing through a point P on the hoop rim? 314 CHAPTER 10 Rotation of a Rigid Object About a Fixed Axis EXAMPLE 10.14 Rotating Rod Revisited energy is entirely rotational energy, 1 I 2, where I is the mo2 ment of inertia about the pivot. Because I 1 ML 2 (see Table 3 10.2) and because mechanical energy is constant, we have Ei Ef or 1 2 MgL 1 2 2I 1 1 2 2 2 (3 ML ) A uniform rod of length L and mass M is free to rotate on a frictionless pin passing through one end (Fig 10.23). The rod is released from rest in the horizontal position. (a) What is its angular speed when it reaches its lowest position? The question can be answered by considering the mechanical energy of the system. When the rod is horizontal, it has no rotational energy. The potential energy relative to the lowest position of the center of mass of the rod (O ) is MgL/2. When the rod reaches its lowest position, the Solution 3g L (b) Determine the linear speed of the center of mass and the linear speed of the lowest point on the rod when it is in the vertical position. O E i = U = MgL/2 L/2 O Solution These two values can be determined from the relationship between linear and angular speeds. We know from part (a), and so the linear speed of the center of mass is v CM r L 2 1 2 3gL 1 E f = K R = I 2 2 Because r for the lowest point on the rod is twice what it is for the center of mass, the lowest point has a linear speed equal to 2v CM 3gL Figure 10.23 A uniform rigid rod pivoted at O rotates in a vertical plane under the action of gravity. EXAMPLE 10.15 Connected Cylinders inertia I about its axis of rotation. The string does not slip on the pulley, and the system is released from rest. Find the linear speeds of the cylinders after cylinder 2 descends through a distance h, and the angular speed of the pulley at this time. Consider two cylinders having masses m1 and m 2 , where m1 m2 , connected by a string passing over a pulley, as shown in Figure 10.24. The pulley has a radius R and moment of R m2 h h m1 Solution We are now able to account for the effect of a massive pulley. Because the string does not slip, the pulley rotates. We neglect friction in the axle about which the pulley rotates for the following reason: Because the axle's radius is small relative to that of the pulley, the frictional torque is much smaller than the torque applied by the two cylinders, provided that their masses are quite different. Mechanical energy is constant; hence, the increase in the system's kinetic energy (the system being the two cylinders, the pulley, and the Earth) equals the decrease in its potential energy. Because K i 0 (the system is initially at rest), we have K Kf Ki (1m 1v f 2 2 1 2 2 m 2v f 1 2 2I f ) 0 R f , this where vf is the same for both blocks. Because vf expression becomes K 1 2 Figure 10.24 m1 m2 I v 2 R2 f Summary From Figure 10.24, we see that the system loses potential energy as cylinder 2 descends and gains potential energy as cylinder 1 rises. That is, U 2 m 2 gh and U 1 m 1gh. Applying the principle of conservation of energy in the form K U1 U 2 0 gives 1 2 315 Because v f stant is R f , the angular speed of the pulley at this invf f R 1 R 2(m 2 m1 m2 m 1)gh I R2 1/2 m1 m2 I v 2 R2 f 2(m 2 m1 m2 m 1gh m 1)gh I R2 m 2gh 1/2 0 Exercise vf Repeat the calculation of vf , using I applied to the pulley and Newton's second law applied to the two cylinders. Use the procedures presented in Examples 10.12 and 10.13. SUMMARY If a particle rotates in a circle of radius r through an angle (measured in radians), the arc length it moves through is s r . The angular displacement of a particle rotating in a circle or of a rigid object rotating about a fixed axis is f i (10.2) The instantaneous angular speed of a particle rotating in a circle or of a rigid object rotating about a fixed axis is d dt The instantaneous angular acceleration of a rotating object is d dt (10.6) (10.4) When a rigid object rotates about a fixed axis, every part of the object has the same angular speed and the same angular acceleration. If a particle or object rotates about a fixed axis under constant angular acceleration, one can apply equations of kinematics that are analogous to those for linear motion under constant linear acceleration: f f f 2 i i i 2 t it 1 2 f (10.7) t2 i) (10.8) (10.9) 2 ( A useful technique in solving problems dealing with rotation is to visualize a linear version of the same problem. When a rigid object rotates about a fixed axis, the angular position, angular speed, and angular acceleration are related to the linear position, linear speed, and linear acceleration through the relationships s v at ru r r (10.1a) (10.10) (10.11) 316 CHAPTER 10 Rotation of a Rigid Object About a Fixed Axis You must be able to easily alternate between the linear and rotational variables that describe a given situation. The moment of inertia of a system of particles is I i mi ri 2 (10.15) If a rigid object rotates about a fixed axis with angular speed , its rotational energy can be written KR 1 2 2I (10.16) where I is the moment of inertia about the axis of rotation. The moment of inertia of a rigid object is I r 2 dm (10.17) where r is the distance from the mass element dm to the axis of rotation. The magnitude of the torque associated with a force F acting on an object is Fd (10.19) where d is the moment arm of the force, which is the perpendicular distance from some origin to the line of action of the force. Torque is a measure of the tendency of the force to change the rotation of the object about some axis. If a rigid object free to rotate about a fixed axis has a net external torque acting on it, the object undergoes an angular acceleration , where I (10.21) The rate at which work is done by an external force in rotating a rigid object about a fixed axis, or the power delivered, is (10.23) The net work done by external forces in rotating a rigid object about a fixed axis equals the change in the rotational kinetic energy of the object: W 1 2 2I f 1 2 2I i (10.24) QUESTIONS 1. What is the angular speed of the second hand of a clock? What is the direction of as you view a clock hanging vertically? What is the magnitude of the angular acceleration vector of the second hand? 2. A wheel rotates counterclockwise in the xy plane. What is the direction of ? What is the direction of if the angular velocity is decreasing in time? 3. Are the kinematic expressions for , , and valid when the angular displacement is measured in degrees instead of in radians? 4. A turntable rotates at a constant rate of 45 rev/min. What is its angular speed in radians per second? What is the magnitude of its angular acceleration? 5. Suppose a b and M m for the system of particles described in Figure 10.8. About what axis (x, y, or z) does the moment of inertia have the smallest value? the largest value? 6. Suppose the rod in Figure 10.10 has a nonuniform mass distribution. In general, would the moment of inertia about the y axis still equal ML2/12? If not, could the moment of inertia be calculated without knowledge of the manner in which the mass is distributed? 7. Suppose that only two external forces act on a rigid body, and the two forces are equal in magnitude but opposite in direction. Under what condition does the body rotate? 8. Explain how you might use the apparatus described in Example 10.12 to determine the moment of inertia of the wheel. (If the wheel does not have a uniform mass density, the moment of inertia is not necessarily equal to 1 2 2 MR .) Problems 9. Using the results from Example 10.12, how would you calculate the angular speed of the wheel and the linear speed of the suspended mass at t 2 s, if the system is released from rest at t 0? Is the expression v R valid in this situation? 10. If a small sphere of mass M were placed at the end of the rod in Figure 10.23, would the result for be greater than, less than, or equal to the value obtained in Example 10.14? 11. Explain why changing the axis of rotation of an object changes its moment of inertia. 12. Is it possible to change the translational kinetic energy of an object without changing its rotational energy? 13. Two cylinders having the same dimensions are set into rotation about their long axes with the same angular speed. 317 14. 15. 16. 17. One is hollow, and the other is filled with water. Which cylinder will be easier to stop rotating? Explain your answer. Must an object be rotating to have a nonzero moment of inertia? If you see an object rotating, is there necessarily a net torque acting on it? Can a (momentarily) stationary object have a nonzero angular acceleration? The polar diameter of the Earth is slightly less than the equatorial diameter. How would the moment of inertia of the Earth change if some mass from near the equator were removed and transferred to the polar regions to make the Earth a perfect sphere? PROBLEMS 1, 2, 3 = straightforward, intermediate, challenging = full solution available in the Student Solutions Manual and Study Guide WEB = solution posted at http://www.saunderscollege.com/physics/ = Computer useful in solving problem = Interactive Physics = paired numerical/symbolic problems Section 10.2 Rotational Kinematics: Rotational Motion with Constant Angular Acceleration 1. A wheel starts from rest and rotates with constant angular acceleration and reaches an angular speed of 12.0 rad/s in 3.00 s. Find (a) the magnitude of the angular acceleration of the wheel and (b) the angle (in radians) through which it rotates in this time. 2. What is the angular speed in radians per second of (a) the Earth in its orbit about the Sun and (b) the Moon in its orbit about the Earth? 3. An airliner arrives at the terminal, and its engines are shut off. The rotor of one of the engines has an initial clockwise angular speed of 2 000 rad/s. The engine's rotation slows with an angular acceleration of magnitude 80.0 rad/s2. (a) Determine the angular speed after 10.0 s. (b) How long does it take for the rotor to come to rest? 4. (a) The positions of the hour and minute hand on a clock face coincide at 12 o'clock. Determine all other times (up to the second) at which the positions of the hands coincide. (b) If the clock also has a second hand, determine all times at which the positions of all three hands coincide, given that they all coincide at 12 o'clock. 5. An electric motor rotating a grinding wheel at 100 rev/min is switched off. Assuming constant negative acceleration of magnitude 2.00 rad/s2, (a) how long does it take the wheel to stop? (b) Through how many radians does it turn during the time found in part (a)? 6. A centrifuge in a medical laboratory rotates at a rotational speed of 3 600 rev/min. When switched off, it rotates 50.0 times before coming to rest. Find the constant angular acceleration of the centrifuge. 7. The angular position of a swinging door is described by 5.00 10.0t 2.00t 2 rad. Determine the angular position, angular speed, and angular acceleration of the door (a) at t 0 and (b) at t 3.00 s. 8. The tub of a washer goes into its spin cycle, starting from rest and gaining angular speed steadily for 8.00 s, when it is turning at 5.00 rev/s. At this point the person doing the laundry opens the lid, and a safety switch turns off the washer. The tub smoothly slows to rest in 12.0 s. Through how many revolutions does the tub turn while it is in motion? 9. A rotating wheel requires 3.00 s to complete 37.0 revolutions. Its angular speed at the end of the 3.00-s interval is 98.0 rad/s. What is the constant angular acceleration of the wheel? 10. (a) Find the angular speed of the Earth's rotation on its axis. As the Earth turns toward the east, we see the sky turning toward the west at this same rate. (b) The rainy Pleiads wester And seek beyond the sea The head that I shall dream of That shall not dream of me. A. E. Housman ( Robert E. Symons) WEB Cambridge, England, is at longitude 0, and Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, is at longitude 107 west. How much time elapses after the Pleiades set in Cambridge until these stars fall below the western horizon in Saskatoon? Section 10.3 Angular and Linear Quantities 11. Make an order-of-magnitude estimate of the number of revolutions through which a typical automobile tire 318 CHAPTER 10 Rotation of a Rigid Object About a Fixed Axis sume the discus moves on the arc of a circle 1.00 m in radius. (a) Calculate the final angular speed of the discus. (b) Determine the magnitude of the angular acceleration of the discus, assuming it to be constant. (c) Calculate the acceleration time. 17. A car accelerates uniformly from rest and reaches a speed of 22.0 m/s in 9.00 s. If the diameter of a tire is 58.0 cm, find (a) the number of revolutions the tire makes during this motion, assuming that no slipping occurs. (b) What is the final rotational speed of a tire in revolutions per second? 18. A 6.00-kg block is released from A on the frictionless track shown in Figure P10.18. Determine the radial and tangential components of acceleration for the block at P. turns in 1 yr. State the quantities you measure or estimate and their values. 12. The diameters of the main rotor and tail rotor of a single-engine helicopter are 7.60 m and 1.02 m, respectively. The respective rotational speeds are 450 rev/min and 4 138 rev/min. Calculate the speeds of the tips of both rotors. Compare these speeds with the speed of sound, 343 m/s. A Figure P10.12 (Ross Harrrison Koty/Tony Stone Images) h = 5.00 m R = 2.00 m P 13. A racing car travels on a circular track with a radius of 250 m. If the car moves with a constant linear speed of 45.0 m/s, find (a) its angular speed and (b) the magnitude and direction of its acceleration. 14. A car is traveling at 36.0 km/h on a straight road. The radius of its tires is 25.0 cm. Find the angular speed of one of the tires, with its axle taken as the axis of rotation. 15. A wheel 2.00 m in diameter lies in a vertical plane and rotates with a constant angular acceleration of 4.00 rad/s2. The wheel starts at rest at t 0, and the radius vector of point P on the rim makes an angle of 57.3 with the horizontal at this time. At t 2.00 s, find (a) the angular speed of the wheel, (b) the linear speed and acceleration of the point P, and (c) the angular position of the point P. 16. A discus thrower accelerates a discus from rest to a speed of 25.0 m/s by whirling it through 1.25 rev. As- Figure P10.18 WEB Figure P10.16 (Bruce Ayers/Tony Stone Images) 19. A disc 8.00 cm in radius rotates at a constant rate of 1 200 rev/min about its central axis. Determine (a) its angular speed, (b) the linear speed at a point 3.00 cm from its center, (c) the radial acceleration of a point on the rim, and (d) the total distance a point on the rim moves in 2.00 s. 20. A car traveling on a flat (unbanked) circular track accelerates uniformly from rest with a tangential acceleration of 1.70 m/s2. The car makes it one quarter of the way around the circle before it skids off the track. Determine the coefficient of static friction between the car and track from these data. 21. A small object with mass 4.00 kg moves counterclockwise with constant speed 4.50 m/s in a circle of radius 3.00 m centered at the origin. (a) It started at the point with cartesian coordinates (3 m, 0). When its angular displacement is 9.00 rad, what is its position vector, in cartesian unit-vector notation? (b) In what quadrant is the particle located, and what angle does its position vector make with the positive x axis? (c) What is its velocity vector, in unit vector notation? (d) In what direction is it moving? Make a sketch of the position and velocity vectors. (e) What is its acceleration, expressed in unit vector notation? (f) What total force acts on the object? (Express your answer in unit vector notation.) Problems 22. A standard cassette tape is placed in a standard cassette player. Each side plays for 30 min. The two tape wheels of the cassette fit onto two spindles in the player. Suppose that a motor drives one spindle at a constant angular speed of 1 rad/s and that the other spindle is free to rotate at any angular speed. Estimate the order of magnitude of the thickness of the tape. 319 y(m) 3.00 kg 2.00 kg 6.00 m O 4.00 m x(m) Section 10.4 Rotational Energy 23. Three small particles are connected by rigid rods of negligible mass lying along the y axis (Fig. P10.23). If the system rotates about the x axis with an angular speed of 2.00 rad/s, find (a) the moment of inertia about the x axis and the total rotational kinetic energy evaluated from 1I 2 and (b) the linear speed of each 2 particle and the total kinetic energy evaluated from 1 2 2 m iv i . 2.00 kg 4.00 kg Figure P10.25 y 4.00 kg y = 3.00 m O 2.00 kg y = 2.00 m x 3.00 kg y = 4.00 m Figure P10.26 Problems 26 and 74. ( John Lawrence/Tony Stone Images) Figure P10.23 WEB 24. The center of mass of a pitched baseball (3.80-cm radius) moves at 38.0 m/s. The ball spins about an axis through its center of mass with an angular speed of 125 rad/s. Calculate the ratio of the rotational energy to the translational kinetic energy. Treat the ball as a uniform sphere. 25. The four particles in Figure P10.25 are connected by rigid rods of negligible mass. The origin is at the center of the rectangle. If the system rotates in the xy plane about the z axis with an angular speed of 6.00 rad/s, calculate (a) the moment of inertia of the system about the z axis and (b) the rotational energy of the system. 26. The hour hand and the minute hand of Big Ben, the famous Parliament tower clock in London, are 2.70 m long and 4.50 m long and have masses of 60.0 kg and 100 kg, respectively. Calculate the total rotational kinetic energy of the two hands about the axis of rotation. (You may model the hands as long thin rods.) 27. Two masses M and m are connected by a rigid rod of length L and of negligible mass, as shown in Figure P10.27. For an axis perpendicular to the rod, show that the system has the minimum moment of inertia when the axis passes through the center of mass. Show that this moment of inertia is I L2, where mM/(m M). L M x Lx m Figure P10.27 Section 10.5 Calculation of Moments of Inertia 28. Three identical thin rods, each of length L and mass m, are welded perpendicular to each other, as shown in Figure P10.28. The entire setup is rotated about an axis 320 CHAPTER 10 Rotation of a Rigid Object About a Fixed Axis 31. Attention! About face! Compute an order-of-magnitude estimate for the moment of inertia of your body as you stand tall and turn around a vertical axis passing through the top of your head and the point halfway between your ankles. In your solution state the quantities you measure or estimate and their values. Section 10.6 Torque 32. Find the mass m needed to balance the 1 500-kg truck on the incline shown in Figure P10.32. Assume all pulleys are frictionless and massless. 3r Axis of rotation r Figure P10.28 that passes through the end of one rod and is parallel to another. Determine the moment of inertia of this arrangement. 29. Figure P10.29 shows a side view of a car tire and its radial dimensions. The rubber tire has two sidewalls of uniform thickness 0.635 cm and a tread wall of uniform thickness 2.50 cm and width 20.0 cm. Suppose its density is uniform, with the value 1.10 103 kg/m3. Find its moment of inertia about an axis through its center perpendicular to the plane of the sidewalls. m 1500 kg = 45 Sidewall Figure P10.32 33.0 cm WEB 16.5 cm 33. Find the net torque on the wheel in Figure P10.33 about the axle through O if a 10.0 cm and b 25.0 cm. 10.0 N 30.5 cm Tread 30.0 a O 12.0 N Figure P10.29 30. Use the parallel-axis theorem and Table 10.2 to find the moments of inertia of (a) a solid cylinder about an axis parallel to the center-of-mass axis and passing through the edge of the cylinder and (b) a solid sphere about an axis tangent to its surface. b 9.00 N Figure P10.33 34. The fishing pole in Figure P10.34 makes an angle of 20.0 with the horizontal. What is the torque exerted by Problems I, R 321 2.00 m 20.0 20.0 37.0 m1 100 N m2 Figure P10.39 Figure P10.34 in the shape of a disk having radius R 0.250 m and mass M 10.0 kg. These blocks are allowed to move on a fixed block wedge of angle 30.0, as shown in Figure P10.39. The coefficient of kinetic friction for both blocks is 0.360. Draw free-body diagrams of both blocks and of the pulley. Determine (a) the acceleration of the two blocks and (b) the tensions in the string on both sides of the pulley. 40. A potter's wheel -- a thick stone disk with a radius of 0.500 m and a mass of 100 kg -- is freely rotating at 50.0 rev/min. The potter can stop the wheel in 6.00 s by pressing a wet rag against the rim and exerting a radially inward force of 70.0 N. Find the effective coefficient of kinetic friction between the wheel and the rag. 41. A bicycle wheel has a diameter of 64.0 cm and a mass of 1.80 kg. Assume that the wheel is a hoop with all of its mass concentrated on the outside radius. The bicycle is placed on a stationary stand on rollers, and a resistive force of 120 N is applied tangent to the rim of the tire. (a) What force must be applied by a chain passing over a 9.00-cm-diameter sprocket if the wheel is to attain an acceleration of 4.50 rad/s2? (b) What force is required if the chain shifts to a 5.60-cm-diameter sprocket? the fish about an axis perpendicular to the page and passing through the fisher's hand? 35. The tires of a 1 500-kg car are 0.600 m in diameter, and the coefficients of friction with the road surface are 0.800 and k 0.600. Assuming that the weight is s evenly distributed on the four wheels, calculate the maximum torque that can be exerted by the engine on a driving wheel such that the wheel does not spin. If you wish, you may suppose that the car is at rest. 36. Suppose that the car in Problem 35 has a disk brake system. Each wheel is slowed by the frictional force between a single brake pad and the disk-shaped rotor. On this particular car, the brake pad comes into contact with the rotor at an average distance of 22.0 cm from the axis. The coefficients of friction between the brake pad and the disk are s 0.600 and k 0.500. Calculate the normal force that must be applied to the rotor such that the car slows as quickly as possible. Section 10.7 Relationship Between Torque and Angular Acceleration WEB 37. A model airplane having a mass of 0.750 kg is tethered by a wire so that it flies in a circle 30.0 m in radius. The airplane engine provides a net thrust of 0.800 N perpendicular to the tethering wire. (a) Find the torque the net thrust produces about the center of the circle. (b) Find the angular acceleration of the airplane when it is in level flight. (c) Find the linear acceleration of the airplane tangent to its flight path. 38. The combination of an applied force and a frictional force produces a constant total torque of 36.0 N m on a wheel rotating about a fixed axis. The applied force acts for 6.00 s; during this time the angular speed of the wheel increases from 0 to 10.0 rad/s. The applied force is then removed, and the wheel comes to rest in 60.0 s. Find (a) the moment of inertia of the wheel, (b) the magnitude of the frictional torque, and (c) the total number of revolutions of the wheel. 39. A block of mass m1 2.00 kg and a block of mass m 2 6.00 kg are connected by a massless string over a pulley Section 10.8 Work , Power, and Energy in Rotational Motion 42. A cylindrical rod 24.0 cm long with a mass of 1.20 kg and a radius of 1.50 cm has a ball with a diameter of 8.00 cm and a mass of 2.00 kg attached to one end. The arrangement is originally vertical and stationary, with the ball at the top. The apparatus is free to pivot about the bottom end of the rod. (a) After it falls through 90, what is its rotational kinetic energy? (b) What is the angular speed of the rod and ball? (c) What is the linear speed of the ball? (d) How does this compare with the speed if the ball had fallen freely through the same distance of 28 cm? 43. A 15.0-kg mass and a 10.0-kg mass are suspended by a pulley that has a radius of 10.0 cm and a mass of 3.00 kg (Fig. P10.43). The cord has a negligible mass and causes the pulley to rotate without slipping. The pulley 322 CHAPTER 10 Rotation of a Rigid Object About a Fixed Axis rotates without friction. The masses start from rest 3.00 m apart. Treating the pulley as a uniform disk, determine the speeds of the two masses as they pass each other. 44. A mass m 1 and a mass m 2 are suspended by a pulley that has a radius R and a mass M (see Fig. P10.43). The cord has a negligible mass and causes the pulley to rotate without slipping. The pulley rotates without friction. The masses start from rest a distance d apart. Treating the pulley as a uniform disk, determine the speeds of the two masses as they pass each other. m Figure P10.47 v. Show that the moment of inertia I of the equipment (including the turntable) is mr 2(2gh/v 2 1). 48. A bus is designed to draw its power from a rotating flywheel that is brought up to its maximum rate of rotation (3 000 rev/min) by an electric motor. The flywheel is a solid cylinder with a mass of 1 000 kg and a diameter of 1.00 m. If the bus requires an average power of 10.0 kW, how long does the flywheel rotate? 49. (a) A uniform, solid disk of radius R and mass M is free to rotate on a frictionless pivot through a point on its rim (Fig. P10.49). If the disk is released from rest in the position shown by the blue circle, what is the speed of its center of mass when the disk reaches the position indicated by the dashed circle? (b) What is the speed of the lowest point on the disk in the dashed position? (c) Repeat part (a), using a uniform hoop. M R m1 3.00 m M = 3.00 kg R = 10.0 cm m1 = 15.0 kg m2 = 10.0 kg m2 Figure P10.43 Problems 43 and 44. 45. A weight of 50.0 N is attached to the free end of a light string wrapped around a reel with a radius of 0.250 m and a mass of 3.00 kg. The reel is a solid disk, free to rotate in a vertical plane about the horizontal axis passing through its center. The weight is released 6.00 m above the floor. (a) Determine the tension in the string, the acceleration of the mass, and the speed with which the weight hits the floor. (b) Find the speed calculated in part (a), using the principle of conservation of energy. 46. A constant torque of 25.0 N m is applied to a grindstone whose moment of inertia is 0.130 kg m2. Using energy principles, find the angular speed after the grindstone has made 15.0 revolutions. (Neglect friction.) 47. This problem describes one experimental method of determining the moment of inertia of an irregularly shaped object such as the payload for a satellite. Figure P10.47 shows a mass m suspended by a cord wound around a spool of radius r, forming part of a turntable supporting the object. When the mass is released from rest, it descends through a distance h, acquiring a speed Pivot R g Figure P10.49 50. A horizontal 800-N merry-go-round is a solid disk of radius 1.50 m and is started from rest by a constant horizontal force of 50.0 N applied tangentially to the cylinder. Find the kinetic energy of the solid cylinder after 3.00 s. ADDITIONAL PROBLEMS 51. Toppling chimneys often break apart in mid-fall (Fig. P10.51) because the mortar between the bricks cannot Problems withstand much shear stress. As the chimney begins to fall, shear forces must act on the topmost sections to accelerate them tangentially so that they can keep up with the rotation of the lower part of the stack. For simplicity, let us model the chimney as a uniform rod of length pivoted at the lower end. The rod starts at rest in a vertical position (with the frictionless pivot at the bottom) and falls over under the influence of gravity. What fraction of the length of the rod has a tangential acceleration greater than g sin , where is the angle the chimney makes with the vertical? 323 exerts on the wheel. (a) How long does the wheel take to reach its final rotational speed of 1 200 rev/min? (b) Through how many revolutions does it turn while accelerating? 54. The density of the Earth, at any distance r from its center, is approximately [14.2 11.6 r/R] 10 3 kg/m3 where R is the radius of the Earth. Show that this density leads to a moment of inertia I 0.330MR 2 about an axis through the center, where M is the mass of the Earth. 55. A 4.00-m length of light nylon cord is wound around a uniform cylindrical spool of radius 0.500 m and mass 1.00 kg. The spool is mounted on a frictionless axle and is initially at rest. The cord is pulled from the spool with a constant acceleration of magnitude 2.50 m/s2. (a) How much work has been done on the spool when it reaches an angular speed of 8.00 rad/s? (b) Assuming that there is enough cord on the spool, how long does it take the spool to reach this angular speed? (c) Is there enough cord on the spool? 56. A flywheel in the form of a heavy circular disk of diameter 0.600 m and mass 200 kg is mounted on a frictionless bearing. A motor connected to the flywheel accelerates it from rest to 1 000 rev/min. (a) What is the moment of inertia of the flywheel? (b) How much work is done on it during this acceleration? (c) When the angular speed reaches 1 000 rev/min, the motor is disengaged. A friction brake is used to slow the rotational rate to 500 rev/min. How much energy is dissipated as internal energy in the friction brake? 57. A shaft is turning at 65.0 rad/s at time zero. Thereafter, its angular acceleration is given by 10 rad/s2 5t rad/s3 Figure P10.51 A building demolition site in Baltimore, MD. At the left is a chimney, mostly concealed by the building, that has broken apart on its way down. Compare with Figure 10.19. ( Jerry Wachter/Photo Researchers, Inc.) 52. Review Problem. A mixing beater consists of three thin rods: Each is 10.0 cm long, diverges from a central hub, and is separated from the others by 120. All turn in the same plane. A ball is attached to the end of each rod. Each ball has a cross-sectional area of 4.00 cm2 and is shaped so that it has a drag coefficient of 0.600. Calculate the power input required to spin the beater at 1 000 rev/min (a) in air and (b) in water. 53. A grinding wheel is in the form of a uniform solid disk having a radius of 7.00 cm and a mass of 2.00 kg. It starts from rest and accelerates uniformly under the action of the constant torque of 0.600 N m that the motor where t is the elapsed time. (a) Find its angular speed at t 3.00 s. (b) How far does it turn in these 3 s? 58. For any given rotational axis, the radius of gyration K of a rigid body is defined by the expression K 2 I/M, where M is the total mass of the body and I is its moment of inertia. Thus, the radius of gyration is equal to the distance between an imaginary point mass M and the axis of rotation such that I for the point mass about that axis is the same as that for the rigid body. Find the radius of gyration of (a) a solid disk of radius R, (b) a uniform rod of length L, and (c) a solid sphere of radius R, all three of which are rotating about a central axis. 59. A long, uniform rod of length L and mass M is pivoted about a horizontal, frictionless pin passing through one end. The rod is released from rest in a vertical position, as shown in Figure P10.59. At the instant the rod is horizontal, find (a) its angular speed, (b) the magnitude of its angular acceleration, (c) the x and y components of the acceleration of its center of mass, and (d) the components of the reaction force at the pivot. 324 y CHAPTER 10 Rotation of a Rigid Object About a Fixed Axis L A drop that breaks loose on the next turn rises a distance h 2 h1 above the tangent point. The height to which the drops rise decreases because the angular speed of the wheel decreases. From this information, determine the magnitude of the average angular acceleration of the wheel. 62. The top shown in Figure P10.62 has a moment of inertia of 4.00 10 4 kg m2 and is initially at rest. It is free to rotate about the stationary axis AA . A string, wrapped around a peg along the axis of the top, is pulled in such a manner that a constant tension of 5.57 N is maintained. If the string does not slip while it is unwound from the peg, what is the angular speed of the top after 80.0 cm of string has been pulled off the peg? Pivot x Figure P10.59 h A F A Figure P10.62 63. A cord is wrapped around a pulley of mass m and of radius r. The free end of the cord is connected to a block of mass M. The block starts from rest and then slides down an incline that makes an angle with the horizontal. The coefficient of kinetic friction between block and incline is . (a) Use energy methods to show that the block's speed as a function of displacement d down the incline is v [4gdM(m 2M ) 1(sin cos )]1/2 Figure P10.60 Problems 60 and 61. 60. A bicycle is turned upside down while its owner repairs a flat tire. A friend spins the other wheel, of radius 0.381 m, and observes that drops of water fly off tangentially. She measures the height reached by drops moving vertically (Fig. P10.60). A drop that breaks loose from the tire on one turn rises h 54.0 cm above the tangent point. A drop that breaks loose on the next turn rises 51.0 cm above the tangent point. The height to which the drops rise decreases because the angular speed of the wheel decreases. From this information, determine the magnitude of the average angular acceleration of the wheel. 61. A bicycle is turned upside down while its owner repairs a flat tire. A friend spins the other wheel of radius R and observes that drops of water fly off tangentially. She measures the height reached by drops moving vertically (see Fig. P10.60). A drop that breaks loose from the tire on one turn rises a distance h1 above the tangent point. (b) Find the magnitude of the acceleration of the block in terms of , m, M, g, and . 64. (a) What is the rotational energy of the Earth about its spin axis? The radius of the Earth is 6 370 km, and its mass is 5.98 1024 kg. Treat the Earth as a sphere of moment of inertia 2MR 2. (b) The rotational energy of 5 the Earth is decreasing steadily because of tidal friction. Estimate the change in one day, given that the rotational period increases by about 10 s each year. 65. The speed of a moving bullet can be determined by allowing the bullet to pass through two rotating paper disks mounted a distance d apart on the same axle (Fig. P10.65). From the angular displacement of the two Problems = 31 v 325 d Figure P10.65 bullet holes in the disks and the rotational speed of the disks, we can determine the speed v of the bullet. Find the bullet speed for the following data: d 80 cm, 900 rev/min, and 31.0. A wheel is formed from a hoop and n equally spaced spokes extending from the center of the hoop to its rim. The mass of the hoop is M, and the radius of the hoop (and hence the length of each spoke) is R. The mass of each spoke is m. Determine (a) the moment of inertia of the wheel about an axis through its center and perpendicular to the plane of the wheel and (b) the moment of inertia of the wheel about an axis through its rim and perpendicular to the plane of the wheel. A uniform, thin, solid door has a height of 2.20 m, a width of 0.870 m, and a mass of 23.0 kg. Find its moment of inertia for rotation on its hinges. Are any of the data unnecessary? A uniform, hollow, cylindrical spool has inside radius R/2, outside radius R , and mass M (Fig. P10.68). It is mounted so that it rotates on a massless horizontal axle. A mass m is connected to the end of a string wound around the spool. The mass m falls from rest through a distance y in time t. Show that the torque due to the frictional forces between spool and axle is R[m(g 2y/t 2) M(5y/4t 2)] f An electric motor can accelerate a Ferris wheel of moment of inertia I 20 000 kg m2 from rest to 10.0 rev/min in 12.0 s. When the motor is turned off, friction causes the wheel to slow down from 10.0 to 8.00 rev/min in 10.0 s. Determine (a) the torque generated by the motor to bring the wheel to 10.0 rev/min and (b) the power that would be needed to maintain this rotational speed. 70. The pulley shown in Figure P10.70 has radius R and moment of inertia I. One end of the mass m is connected to a spring of force constant k, and the other end is fastened to a cord wrapped around the pulley. The pulley axle and the incline are frictionless. If the pulley is wound counterclockwise so that the spring is stretched a distance d from its unstretched position and is then released from rest, find (a) the angular speed of the pulley when the spring is again unstretched and (b) a numerical value for the angular speed at this point if I 1.00 kg m2, R 0.300 m, k 50.0 N/m, m 0.500 kg, d 0.200 m, and 37.0. 66. R m k 67. Figure P10.70 68. 69. 71. Two blocks, as shown in Figure P10.71, are connected by a string of negligible mass passing over a pulley of radius 0.250 m and moment of inertia I. The block on the frictionless incline is moving upward with a constant acceleration of 2.00 m/s2. (a) Determine T1 and T2 , the tensions in the two parts of the string. (b) Find the moment of inertia of the pulley. 72. A common demonstration, illustrated in Figure P10.72, consists of a ball resting at one end of a uniform board M 2.00 m/s2 T1 15.0 kg m m1 T2 R/2 R/2 y 37.0 m 2 20.0 kg Figure P10.68 Figure P10.71 326 CHAPTER 10 Rotation of a Rigid Object About a Fixed Axis this limiting angle and the cup is placed at rc 2 3 cos of length , hinged at the other end, and elevated at an angle . A light cup is attached to the board at rc so that it will catch the ball when the support stick is suddenly Cup (c) If a ball is at the end of a 1.00-m stick at this critical angle, show that the cup must be 18.4 cm from the moving end. 73. As a result of friction, the angular speed of a wheel changes with time according to the relationship d /dt 0e t rc Support stick Hinged end Figure P10.72 removed. (a) Show that the ball will lag behind the falling board when is less than 35.3 ; and that (b) the ball will fall into the cup when the board is supported at where 0 and are constants. The angular speed changes from 3.50 rad/s at t 0 to 2.00 rad/s at t 9.30 s. Use this information to determine and 0 . Then, determine (a) the magnitude of the angular acceleration at t 3.00 s, (b) the number of revolutions the wheel makes in the first 2.50 s, and (c) the number of revolutions it makes before coming to rest. 74. The hour hand and the minute hand of Big Ben, the famous Parliament tower clock in London, are 2.70 m long and 4.50 m long and have masses of 60.0 kg and 100 kg, respectively (see Fig. P10.26). (a) Determine the total torque due to the weight of these hands about the axis of rotation when the time reads (i) 3:00, (ii) 5:15, (iii) 6:00, (iv) 8:20, and (v) 9:45. (You may model the hands as long thin rods.) (b) Determine all times at which the total torque about the axis of rotation is zero. Determine the times to the nearest second, solving a transcendental equation numerically. ANSWERS TO QUICK QUIZZES 10.1 The fact that is negative indicates that we are dealing with an object that is rotating in the clockwise direction. We also know that when and are antiparallel, must be decreasing -- the object is slowing down. Therefore, the object is spinning more and more slowly (with less and less angular speed) in the clockwise, or negative, direction. This has a linear analogy to a sky diver opening her parachute. The velocity is negative -- downward. When the sky diver opens the parachute, a large upward force causes an upward acceleration. As a result, the acceleration and velocity vectors are in opposite directions. Consequently, the parachutist slows down. 10.2 (a) Yes, all points on the wheel have the same angular speed. This is why we use angular quantities to describe rotational motion. (b) No, not all points on the wheel have the same linear speed. (c) v 0, a 0. (d) v R /2, a a r v 2/(R/2) R 2/2 (at is zero at all points because is constant).(e) v R , a R 2. 10.3 (a) I MR 2. (b) I MR 2. The moment of inertia of a system of masses equidistant from an axis of rotation is always the sum of the masses multiplied by the square of the distance from the axis. 10.4 (b) Rotation about the axis through point P requires more work. The moment of inertia of the hoop about the center axis is I CM MR 2, whereas, by the parallelaxis theorem, the moment of inertia about the axis through point P is IP I CM MR 2 MR 2 MR 2 2MR 2 . P U Z Z L E R One of the most popular early bicycles was the penny farthing, introduced in 1870. The bicycle was so named because the size relationship of its two wheels was about the same as the size relationship of the penny and the farthing, two English coins. When the rider looks down at the top of the front wheel, he sees it moving forward faster than he and the handlebars are moving. Yet the center of the wheel does not appear to be moving at all relative to the handlebars. How can different parts of the rolling wheel move at different linear speeds? ( Steve Lovegrove/Tasmanian Photo Library) c h a p t e r Rolling Motion and Angular Momentum Chapter Outline 11.1 11.2 11.3 11.4 Rolling Motion of a Rigid Object The Vector Product and Torque Angular Momentum of a Particle Angular Momentum of a Rotating Rigid Object Momentum 11.6 (Optional) The Motion of Gyroscopes and Tops 11.7 (Optional) Angular Momentum as a Fundamental Quantity 11.5 Conservation of Angular 327 328 CHAPTER 11 Rolling Motion and Angular Momentum I n the preceding chapter we learned how to treat a rigid body rotating about a fixed axis; in the present chapter, we move on to the more general case in which the axis of rotation is not fixed in space. We begin by describing such motion, which is called rolling motion. The central topic of this chapter is, however, angular momentum, a quantity that plays a key role in rotational dynamics. In analogy to the conservation of linear momentum, we find that the angular momentum of a rigid object is always conserved if no external torques act on the object. Like the law of conservation of linear momentum, the law of conservation of angular momentum is a fundamental law of physics, equally valid for relativistic and quantum systems. 11.1 7.7 ROLLING MOTION OF A RIGID OBJECT In this section we treat the motion of a rigid object rotating about a moving axis. In general, such motion is very complex. However, we can simplify matters by restricting our discussion to a homogeneous rigid object having a high degree of symmetry, such as a cylinder, sphere, or hoop. Furthermore, we assume that the object undergoes rolling motion along a flat surface. We shall see that if an object such as a cylinder rolls without slipping on the surface (we call this pure rolling motion), a simple relationship exists between its rotational and translational motions. Suppose a cylinder is rolling on a straight path. As Figure 11.1 shows, the center of mass moves in a straight line, but a point on the rim moves in a more complex path called a cycloid. This means that the axis of rotation remains parallel to its initial orientation in space. Consider a uniform cylinder of radius R rolling without slipping on a horizontal surface (Fig. 11.2). As the cylinder rotates through an angle , its center of mass moves a linear distance s R (see Eq. 10.1a). Therefore, the linear speed of the center of mass for pure rolling motion is given by v CM ds dt R d dt R (11.1) where is the angular velocity of the cylinder. Equation 11.1 holds whenever a cylinder or sphere rolls without slipping and is the condition for pure rolling Figure 11.1 One light source at the center of a rolling cylinder and another at one point on the rim illustrate the different paths these two points take. The center moves in a straight line (green line), whereas the point on the rim moves in the path called a cycloid (red curve). (Henry Leap and Jim Lehman) 11.1 Rolling Motion of a Rigid Object 329 R s s = R Figure 11.2 In pure rolling motion, as the cylinder rotates through an angle , its center of mass moves a linear distance s R . motion. The magnitude of the linear acceleration of the center of mass for pure rolling motion is a CM dv CM dt R d dt R (11.2) where is the angular acceleration of the cylinder. The linear velocities of the center of mass and of various points on and within the cylinder are illustrated in Figure 11.3. A short time after the moment shown in the drawing, the rim point labeled P will have rotated from the six o'clock position to, say, the seven o'clock position, the point Q will have rotated from the ten o'clock position to the eleven o'clock position, and so on. Note that the linear velocity of any point is in a direction perpendicular to the line from that point to the contact point P. At any instant, the part of the rim that is at point P is at rest relative to the surface because slipping does not occur. All points on the cylinder have the same angular speed. Therefore, because the distance from P to P is twice the distance from P to the center of mass, P has a speed 2v CM 2R . To see why this is so, let us model the rolling motion of the cylinder in Figure 11.4 as a combination of translational (linear) motion and rotational motion. For the pure translational motion shown in Figure 11.4a, imagine that the cylinder does not rotate, so that each point on it moves to the right with speed v CM . For the pure rotational motion shown in Figure 11.4b, imagine that a rotation axis through the center of mass is stationary, so that each point on the cylinder has the same rotational speed . The combination of these two motions represents the rolling motion shown in Figure 11.4c. Note in Figure 11.4c that the top of the cylinder has linear speed v CM R v CM v CM 2v CM , which is greater than the linear speed of any other point on the cylinder. As noted earlier, the center of mass moves with linear speed v CM while the contact point between the surface and cylinder has a linear speed of zero. We can express the total kinetic energy of the rolling cylinder as 7.2 P 2vCM Q CM vCM P Figure 11.3 All points on a rolling object move in a direction perpendicular to an axis through the instantaneous point of contact P. In other words, all points rotate about P. The center of mass of the object moves with a velocity vCM , and the point P moves with a velocity 2vCM . K 1 2I P 2 (11.3) where IP is the moment of inertia about a rotation axis through P. Applying the parallel-axis theorem, we can substitute I P I CM MR 2 into Equation 11.3 to obtain K 1 2 2 I CM 1 2 2 2 MR 330 CHAPTER 11 Rolling Motion and Angular Momentum P P v CM v = R CM v CM CM v=0 P v CM v = R P (b) Pure rotation (a) Pure translation P v = v CM + R = 2v CM CM v = v CM v=0 P (c) Combination of translation and rotation Figure 11.4 The motion of a rolling object can be modeled as a combination of pure translation and pure rotation. or, because v CM Total kinetic energy of a rolling body R , K 1 2 2 I CM 1 2 2 Mv CM (11.4) M R x h vCM Figure 11.5 A sphere rolling down an incline. Mechanical energy is conserved if no slipping occurs. The term 1 I CM 2 represents the rotational kinetic energy of the cylinder about its 2 center of mass, and the term 1Mv CM2 represents the kinetic energy the cylinder 2 would have if it were just translating through space without rotating. Thus, we can say that the total kinetic energy of a rolling object is the sum of the rotational kinetic energy about the center of mass and the translational kinetic energy of the center of mass. We can use energy methods to treat a class of problems concerning the rolling motion of a sphere down a rough incline. (The analysis that follows also applies to the rolling motion of a cylinder or hoop.) We assume that the sphere in Figure 11.5 rolls without slipping and is released from rest at the top of the incline. Note that accelerated rolling motion is possible only if a frictional force is present between the sphere and the incline to produce a net torque about the center of mass. Despite the presence of friction, no loss of mechanical energy occurs because the contact point is at rest relative to the surface at any instant. On the other hand, if the sphere were to slip, mechanical energy would be lost as motion progressed. Using the fact that v CM R for pure rolling motion, we can express Equation 11.4 as 2 v 1 2 K 1 I CM CM 2 2 Mv CM R K 1 2 I CM R2 M v CM2 (11.5) 11.1 Rolling Motion of a Rigid Object 331 By the time the sphere reaches the bottom of the incline, work equal to Mgh has been done on it by the gravitational field, where h is the height of the incline. Because the sphere starts from rest at the top, its kinetic energy at the bottom, given by Equation 11.5, must equal this work done. Therefore, the speed of the center of mass at the bottom can be obtained by equating these two quantities: 1 2 I CM R2 M v CM2 v CM Mgh 2gh I CM/MR 2 1/2 1 (11.6) Quick Quiz 11.1 Imagine that you slide your textbook across a gymnasium floor with a certain initial speed. It quickly stops moving because of friction between it and the floor. Yet, if you were to start a basketball rolling with the same initial speed, it would probably keep rolling from one end of the gym to the other. Why does a basketball roll so far? Doesn't friction affect its motion? EXAMPLE 11.1 Sphere Rolling Down an Incline x sin . Hence, after squaring both sides, we can express the equation above as v CM2 10 gx sin 7 Comparing this with the expression from kinematics, v CM2 2a CMx (see Eq. 2.12), we see that the acceleration of the center of mass is a CM 5 7 For the solid sphere shown in Figure 11.5, calculate the linear speed of the center of mass at the bottom of the incline and the magnitude of the linear acceleration of the center of mass. The sphere starts from the top of the incline with potential energy U g Mgh and kinetic energy K 0. As we have seen before, if it fell vertically from that height, it would have a linear speed of !2gh at the moment before it hit the floor. After rolling down the incline, the linear speed of the center of mass must be less than this value because some of the initial potential energy is diverted into rotational kinetic energy rather than all being converted into translational kinetic energy. For a uniform solid sphere, I CM 2 2 5 MR (see Table 10.2), and therefore Equation 11.6 gives 2gh v CM 1 2/5MR 2 MR 2 1/2 Solution g sin 10 gh 7 1/2 which is less than !2gh. To calculate the linear acceleration of the center of mass, we note that the vertical displacement is related to the displacement x along the incline through the relationship h These results are quite interesting in that both the speed and the acceleration of the center of mass are independent of the mass and the radius of the sphere! That is, all homogeneous solid spheres experience the same speed and acceleration on a given incline. If we repeated the calculations for a hollow sphere, a solid cylinder, or a hoop, we would obtain similar results in which only the factor in front of g sin would differ. The constant factors that appear in the expressions for v CM and a CM depend only on the moment of inertia about the center of mass for the specific body. In all cases, the acceleration of the center of mass is less than g sin , the value the acceleration would have if the incline were frictionless and no rolling occurred. EXAMPLE 11.2 Another Look at the Rolling Sphere (1) Fx Fy Mg sin n Mg cos f Ma CM 0 In this example, let us use dynamic methods to verify the results of Example 11.1. The free-body diagram for the sphere is illustrated in Figure 11.6. Solution mass gives Newton's second law applied to the center of where x is measured along the slanted surface of the incline. Now let us write an expression for the torque acting on the sphere. A convenient axis to choose is the one that passes 332 y CHAPTER 11 Rolling Motion and Angular Momentum clockwise direction, n x CM f Mg cos Mg Mg sin CM fR I CM 2 2 5 MR vCM Because I CM (2) 2 2 5 MR and I CM R a CM/R, we obtain R a CM R 2 5 Ma CM f Substituting Equation (2) into Equation (1) gives a CM 5 7g sin Figure 11.6 incline. Free-body diagram for a solid sphere rolling down an through the center of the sphere and is perpendicular to the plane of the figure.1 Because n and Mg go through the center of mass, they have zero moment arm about this axis and thus do not contribute to the torque. However, the force of static friction produces a torque about this axis equal to fR in the clockwise direction; therefore, because is also in the which agrees with the result of Example 11.1. Note that F ma applies only if F is the net external force exerted on the sphere and a is the acceleration of its center of mass. In the case of our sphere rolling down an incline, even though the frictional force does not change the total kinetic energy of the sphere, it does contribute to F and thus decreases the acceleration of the center of mass. As a result, the final translational kinetic energy is less than it would be in the absence of friction. As mentioned in Example 11.1, some of the initial potential energy is converted to rotational kinetic energy. QuickLab Hold a basketball and a tennis ball side by side at the top of a ramp and release them at the same time. Which reaches the bottom first? Does the outcome depend on the angle of the ramp? What if the angle were 90 (that is, if the balls were in free fall)? Quick Quiz 11.2 Which gets to the bottom first: a ball rolling without sliding down incline A or a box sliding down a frictionless incline B having the same dimensions as incline A? 11.2 2.7 THE VECTOR PRODUCT AND TORQUE Consider a force F acting on a rigid body at the vector position r (Fig. 11.7). The origin O is assumed to be in an inertial frame, so Newton's first law is valid in this case. As we saw in Section 10.6, the magnitude of the torque due to this force relative to the origin is, by definition, rF sin , where is the angle between r and F. The axis about which F tends to produce rotation is perpendicular to the plane formed by r and F. If the force lies in the xy plane, as it does in Figure 11.7, the torque is represented by a vector parallel to the z axis. The force in Figure 11.7 creates a torque that tends to rotate the body counterclockwise about the z axis; thus the direction of is toward increasing z, and is therefore in the positive z direction. If we reversed the direction of F in Figure 11.7, then would be in the negative z direction. The torque involves the two vectors r and F, and its direction is perpendicular to the plane of r and F. We can establish a mathematical relationship between , r, and F, using a new mathematical operation called the vector product, or cross product: r 1 Torque F (11.7) Although a coordinate system whose origin is at the center of mass of a rolling object is not an inertial frame, the expression CM I still applies in the center-of-mass frame. 11.2 The Vector Product and Torque 333 z We now give a formal definition of the vector product. Given any two vectors A and B, the vector product A B is defined as a third vector C, the magnitude of which is AB sin , where is the angle between A and B. That is, if C is given by C then its magnitude is C AB sin (11.9) O A B (11.8) = r F y r P The quantity AB sin is equal to the area of the parallelogram formed by A and B, as shown in Figure 11.8. The direction of C is perpendicular to the plane formed by A and B, and the best way to determine this direction is to use the right-hand rule illustrated in Figure 11.8. The four fingers of the right hand are pointed along A and then "wrapped" into B through the angle . The direction of the erect right thumb is the direction of A B C. Because of the notation, A B is often read "A cross B"; hence, the term cross product. Some properties of the vector product that follow from its definition are as follows: 1. Unlike the scalar product, the vector product is not commutative. Instead, the order in which the two vectors are multiplied in a cross product is important: A B B A (11.10) x F Figure 11.7 The torque vector lies in a direction perpendicular to the plane formed by the position vector r and the applied force vector F. Therefore, if you change the order of the vectors in a cross product, you must change the sign. You could easily verify this relationship with the right-hand rule. 2. If A is parallel to B ( 0 or 180), then A B 0; therefore, it follows that A A 0. 3. If A is perpendicular to B, then A B AB. 4. The vector product obeys the distributive law: A (B C) A B A C (11.11) Properties of the vector product 5. The derivative of the cross product with respect to some variable such as t is d (A dt B) A dB dt dA dt B (11.12) where it is important to preserve the multiplicative order of A and B, in view of Equation 11.10. It is left as an exercise to show from Equations 11.9 and 11.10 and from the definition of unit vectors that the cross products of the rectangular unit vectors i, Right-hand rule C = A B A B C = B A Figure 11.8 The vector product A B is a third vector C having a magnitude AB sin equal to the area of the parallelogram shown. The direction of C is perpendicular to the plane formed by A and B, and this direction is determined by the righthand rule. 334 CHAPTER 11 Rolling Motion and Angular Momentum j, and k obey the following rules: Cross products of unit vectors i i j k i j k i j j j k i k i j k k k i j 0 (11.13a) (11.13b) (11.13c) (11.13d) Signs are interchangeable in cross products. For example, A ( B) A B and i ( j) i j. The cross product of any two vectors A and B can be expressed in the following determinant form: A B i Ax Bx j k Ay Az By Bz i Ay Az By Bz j Ax Az Bx Bz k Ax Ay Bx By Expanding these determinants gives the result A B (Ay Bz Az By)i (Ax Bz Az Bx)j (Ax By Ay Bx)k (11.14) EXAMPLE 11.3 The Cross Product B A ( i i 2j) 3j (2i 2j 3j) 2i 3k 4k 7k Two vectors lying in the xy plane are given by the equations A 2i 3j and B i 2j. Find A B and verify that A B B A. Solution obtain A B Using Equations 11.13a through 11.13d, we (2i 2i 3j) 2j 3j ( i 2j) 4k 3k 7k Therefore, A B B A. As an alternative method for finding A B, we could use Equation 11.14, with Ax 2, Ay 3, Az 0 and Bx 1, By 2, Bz 0: A B (0)i (0)j [(2)(2) (3)( 1)]k 7k ( i) (We have omitted the terms containing i i and j j because, as Equation 11.13a shows, they are equal to zero.) We can show that A B B A, since Exercise Answer Use the results to this example and Equation 11.9 to find the angle between A and B. 60.3 11.3 7.8 ANGULAR MOMENTUM OF A PARTICLE Imagine a rigid pole sticking up through the ice on a frozen pond (Fig. 11.9). A skater glides rapidly toward the pole, aiming a little to the side so that she does not hit it. As she approaches a point beside the pole, she reaches out and grabs the pole, an action that whips her rapidly into a circular path around the pole. Just as the idea of linear momentum helps us analyze translational motion, a rotational analog -- angular momentum -- helps us describe this skater and other objects undergoing rotational motion. To analyze the motion of the skater, we need to know her mass and her velocity, as well as her position relative to the pole. In more general terms, consider a 11.3 Angular Momentum of a Particle 335 particle of mass m located at the vector position r and moving with linear velocity v (Fig. 11.10). The instantaneous angular momentum L of the particle relative to the origin O is defined as the cross product of the particle's instantaneous position vector r and its instantaneous linear momentum p: L r p (11.15) Angular momentum of a particle The SI unit of angular momentum is kg m2/s. It is important to note that both the magnitude and the direction of L depend on the choice of origin. Following the right-hand rule, note that the direction of L is perpendicular to the plane formed by r and p. In Figure 11.10, r and p are in the xy plane, and so L points in the z direction. Because p m v, the magnitude of L is L mvr sin (11.16) where is the angle between r and p. It follows that L is zero when r is parallel to p( 0 or 180). In other words, when the linear velocity of the particle is along a line that passes through the origin, the particle has zero angular momentum 90), with respect to the origin. On the other hand, if r is perpendicular to p ( then L mvr. At that instant, the particle moves exactly as if it were on the rim of a wheel rotating about the origin in a plane defined by r and p. Quick Quiz 11.3 Recall the skater described at the beginning of this section. What would be her angular momentum relative to the pole if she were skating directly toward it? Figure 11.9 As the skater passes the pole, she grabs hold of it. This causes her to swing around the pole rapidly in a circular path. In describing linear motion, we found that the net force on a particle equals the time rate of change of its linear momentum, F dp/dt (see Eq. 9.3). We now show that the net torque acting on a particle equals the time rate of change of its angular momentum. Let us start by writing the net torque on the particle in the form r F r dp dt (11.17) O z L = r p Now let us differentiate Equation 11.15 with respect to time, using the rule given by Equation 11.12: dL dt d (r dt p) r dp dt dr dt p x r m p y Figure 11.10 Remember, it is important to adhere to the order of terms because A B B A. The last term on the right in the above equation is zero because v d r/dt is parallel to p m v (property 2 of the vector product). Therefore, dL dt r dp dt (11.18) The angular momentum L of a particle of mass m and linear momentum p located at the vector position r is a vector given by L r p. The value of L depends on the origin about which it is measured and is a vector perpendicular to both r and p. Comparing Equations 11.17 and 11.18, we see that dL dt (11.19) The net torque equals time rate of change of angular momentum 336 CHAPTER 11 Rolling Motion and Angular Momentum which is the rotational analog of Newton's second law, F d p/dt. Note that torque causes the angular momentum L to change just as force causes linear momentum p to change. This rotational result, Equation 11.19, states that the net torque acting on a particle is equal to the time rate of change of the particle's angular momentum. and L are measured It is important to note that Equation 11.19 is valid only if about the same origin. (Of course, the same origin must be used in calculating all of the torques.) Furthermore, the expression is valid for any origin fixed in an inertial frame. Angular Momentum of a System of Particles The total angular momentum of a system of particles about some point is defined as the vector sum of the angular momenta of the individual particles: L L1 L2 Ln i Li where the vector sum is over all n particles in the system. Because individual angular momenta can change with time, so can the total angular momentum. In fact, from Equations 11.18 and 11.19, we find that the time rate of change of the total angular momentum equals the vector sum of all torques acting on the system, both those associated with internal forces between particles and those associated with external forces. However, the net torque associated with all internal forces is zero. To understand this, recall that Newton's third law tells us that internal forces between particles of the system are equal in magnitude and opposite in direction. If we assume that these forces lie along the line of separation of each pair of particles, then the torque due to each action reaction force pair is zero. That is, the moment arm d from O to the line of action of the forces is equal for both particles. In the summation, therefore, we see that the net internal torque vanishes. We conclude that the total angular momentum of a system can vary with time only if a net external torque is acting on the system, so that we have ext i dL i dt d dt Li i dL dt (11.20) That is, the time rate of change of the total angular momentum of a system about some origin in an inertial frame equals the net external torque acting on the system about that origin. Note that Equation 11.20 is the rotational analog of Equation 9.38, Fext for a system of particles. dp/dt , 11.4 Angular Momentum of a Rotating Rigid Object 337 EXAMPLE 11.4 Circular Motion though the direction of p m v keeps changing. You can visualize this by sliding the vector v in Figure 11.11 parallel to itself until its tail meets the tail of r and by then applying the right-hand rule. (You can use v to determine the direction of L r p because the direction of p is the same as the direction of v.) Line up your fingers so that they point along r and wrap your fingers into the vector v. Your thumb points upward and away from the page; this is the direction of L. Hence, we can write the vector expression L (mvr)k. If the particle were to move clockwise, L would point downward and into the page. (b) Find the magnitude and direction of L in terms of the particle's angular speed . A particle moves in the xy plane in a circular path of radius r, as shown in Figure 11.11. (a) Find the magnitude and direction of its angular momentum relative to O when its linear velocity is v. Solution You might guess that because the linear momentum of the particle is always changing (in direction, not magnitude), the direction of the angular momentum must also change. In this example, however, this is not the case. The magnitude of L is given by L mvr sin 90 mvr (for r perpendicular to v) This value of L is constant because all three factors on the right are constant. The direction of L also is constant, even y v Solution Because v we can express L as L r for a particle rotating in a circle, mvr mr 2 I m r O x where I is the moment of inertia of the particle about the z axis through O. Because the rotation is counterclockwise, the direction of is along the z axis (see Section 10.1). The direction of L is the same as that of , and so we can write the angular momentum as L I I k. Exercise Figure 11.11 A particle moving in a circle of radius r has an angular momentum about O that has magnitude mvr. The vector L r p points out of the diagram. A car of mass 1 500 kg moves with a linear speed of 40 m/s on a circular race track of radius 50 m. What is the magnitude of its angular momentum relative to the center of the track? 3.0 106 kg m2/s Answer 11.4 ANGULAR MOMENTUM OF A ROTATING RIGID OBJECT Consider a rigid object rotating about a fixed axis that coincides with the z axis of a coordinate system, as shown in Figure 11.12. Let us determine the angular momentum of this object. Each particle of the object rotates in the xy plane about the z axis with an angular speed . The magnitude of the angular momentum of a particle of mass mi about the origin O is m i vi ri . Because vi ri , we can express the magnitude of the angular momentum of this particle as Li m ir i 2 . The vector Li is directed along the z axis, as is the vector 338 z CHAPTER 11 Rolling Motion and Angular Momentum We can now find the angular momentum (which in this situation has only a z component) of the whole object by taking the sum of Li over all particles: Lz i L m ir i 2 i m ir i 2 (11.21) Lz r mi x vi y I where I is the moment of inertia of the object about the z axis. Now let us differentiate Equation 11.21 with respect to time, noting that I is constant for a rigid body: dL z dt I d dt I (11.22) When a rigid body rotates about an axis, the angular momentum L is in the same direction as the angular velocity , according to the expression L I . Figure 11.12 where is the angular acceleration relative to the axis of rotation. Because dL z /dt is equal to the net external torque (see Eq. 11.20), we can express Equation 11.22 as dL z dt I (11.23) ext That is, the net external torque acting on a rigid object rotating about a fixed axis equals the moment of inertia about the rotation axis multiplied by the object's angular acceleration relative to that axis. Equation 11.23 also is valid for a rigid object rotating about a moving axis provided the moving axis (1) passes through the center of mass and (2) is a symmetry axis. You should note that if a symmetrical object rotates about a fixed axis passing through its center of mass, you can write Equation 11.21 in vector form as L I , where L is the total angular momentum of the object measured with respect to the axis of rotation. Furthermore, the expression is valid for any object, regardless of its symmetry, if L stands for the component of angular momentum along the axis of rotation.2 EXAMPLE 11.5 Bowling Ball solid sphere. A typical bowling ball might have a mass of 6 kg and a radius of 12 cm. The moment of inertia of a solid sphere about an axis through its center is, from Table 10.2, I 2 2 5 MR 2 5 (6 Estimate the magnitude of the angular momentum of a bowling ball spinning at 10 rev/s, as shown in Figure 11.13. We start by making some estimates of the relevant physical parameters and model the ball as a uniform Solution kg)(0.12 m)2 0.035 kg m2 Therefore, the magnitude of the angular momentum is 2 In general, the expression L I is not always valid. If a rigid object rotates about an arbitrary axis, L and may point in different directions. In this case, the moment of inertia cannot be treated as a scalar. Strictly speaking, L I applies only to rigid objects of any shape that rotate about one of three mutually perpendicular axes (called principal axes) through the center of mass. This is discussed in more advanced texts on mechanics. 11.4 Angular Momentum of a Rotating Rigid Object L I (0.035 kg m2)(10 rev/s)(2 rad/rev) z L 339 2.2 kg m2/s Because of the roughness of our estimates, we probably want to keep only one significant figure, and so L 2 kg m2/s. y Figure 11.13 A bowling ball that rotates about the z axis in the direction shown has an angular momentum L in the positive z direction. If the direction of rotation is reversed, L points in the negative z direction. x EXAMPLE 11.6 Rotating Rod y m2 A rigid rod of mass M and length is pivoted without friction at its center (Fig. 11.14). Two particles of masses m 1 and m 2 are connected to its ends. The combination rotates in a vertical plane with an angular speed . (a) Find an expression for the magnitude of the angular momentum of the system. This is different from the last example in that we now must account for the motion of more than one object. The moment of inertia of the system equals the sum of the moments of inertia of the three components: the rod and the two particles. Referring to Table 10.2 to obtain the expression for the moment of inertia of the rod, and using the expression I mr 2 for each particle, we find that the total moment of inertia about the z axis through O is I 1 M 12 2 2 2 2 Solution O x m 2g m1 m 1g m1 m1 2 m2 m2 2 4 M 3 Figure 11.14 Because gravitational forces act on the rotating rod, there is in general a net nonzero torque about O when m 1 m 2 . This net torque produces an angular acceleration given by ext I. The torque due to the force m 2 g about the pivot is 2 Therefore, the magnitude of the angular momentum is 2 L I 4 M 3 m 2g m1 m2 ext 1 ext 2 cos ( 2 into page) Hence, the net torque exerted on the system about O is 2 1 2 (m 1 (b) Find an expression for the magnitude of the angular acceleration of the system when the rod makes an angle with the horizontal. m 2)g cos Solution If the masses of the two particles are equal, then the system has no angular acceleration because the net torque on the system is zero when m 1 m 2 . If the initial angle is exactly /2 or /2 (vertical position), then the rod will be in equilibrium. To find the angular acceleration of the system at any angle , we first calculate the net torque on the system and then use ext I to obtain an expression for . The torque due to the force m 1 g about the pivot is 1 The direction of into the page if m 2 To find , we use is out of the page if m1 m 2 and is m1 . I , where I was obtained in part (a): ext 2(m 1 (M/3 m 2)g cos m1 m 2) ext I /2 (vertical position) Note that is zero when is /2 or and is a maximum when is 0 or (horizontal position). m 1g 2 cos ( 1 out of page) Exercise Answer If m 2 m 1, at what value of /2. is a maximum? 340 CHAPTER 11 Rolling Motion and Angular Momentum EXAMPLE 11.7 Two Connected Masses Now let us evaluate the total external torque acting on the system about the pulley axle. Because it has a moment arm of zero, the force exerted by the axle on the pulley does not contribute to the torque. Furthermore, the normal force acting on the block is balanced by the force of gravity m 2 g, and so these forces do not contribute to the torque. The force of gravity m 1 g acting on the sphere produces a torque about the axle equal in magnitude to m 1 gR, where R is the moment arm of the force about the axle. (Note that in this situation, the tension is not equal to m 1 g.) This is the total external torque about the pulley axle; that is, ext m 1 gR. Using this result, together with Equation (1) and Equation 11.23, we find ext A sphere of mass m 1 and a block of mass m 2 are connected by a light cord that passes over a pulley, as shown in Figure 11.15. The radius of the pulley is R, and the moment of inertia about its axle is I. The block slides on a frictionless, horizontal surface. Find an expression for the linear acceleration of the two objects, using the concepts of angular momentum and torque. Solution We need to determine the angular momentum of the system, which consists of the two objects and the pulley. Let us calculate the angular momentum about an axis that coincides with the axle of the pulley. At the instant the sphere and block have a common speed v, the angular momentum of the sphere is m 1 vR , and that of the block is m 2 vR . At the same instant, the angular momentum of the pulley is I Iv/R. Hence, the total angular momentum of the system is (1) L m 1vR m 2vR I v R dL dt d (m 1 dt (m 1 m 2)Rv dv dt I v R m 1gR (2) Because dv/dt m 1gR m 2)R I dv R dt v m2 R a, we can solve this for a to obtain a m 1g m 2) (m 1 I/R 2 v m1 Figure 11.15 You may wonder why we did not include the forces that the cord exerts on the objects in evaluating the net torque about the axle. The reason is that these forces are internal to the system under consideration, and we analyzed the system as a whole. Only external torques contribute to the change in the system's angular momentum. 11.5 7.9 CONSERVATION OF ANGULAR MOMENTUM In Chapter 9 we found that the total linear momentum of a system of particles remains constant when the resultant external force acting on the system is zero. We have an analogous conservation law in rotational motion: The total angular momentum of a system is constant in both magnitude and direction if the resultant external torque acting on the system is zero. This follows directly from Equation 11.20, which indicates that if ext Conservation of angular momentum dL dt constant 0 (11.24) (11.25) Ln constant, where then L For a system of particles, we write this conservation law as the index n denotes the nth particle in the system. 11.5 Conservation of Angular Momentum 341 If the mass of an object undergoes redistribution in some way, then the object's moment of inertia changes; hence, its angular speed must change because L I . In this case we express the conservation of angular momentum in the form Li Lf constant (11.26) If the system is an object rotating about a fixed axis, such as the z axis, we can write Lz I , where Lz is the component of L along the axis of rotation and I is the moment of inertia about this axis. In this case, we can express the conservation of angular momentum as Ii i If f constant (11.27) This expression is valid both for rotation about a fixed axis and for rotation about an axis through the center of mass of a moving system as long as that axis remains parallel to itself. We require only that the net external torque be zero. Although we do not prove it here, there is an important theorem concerning the angular momentum of an object relative to the object's center of mass: The resultant torque acting on an object about an axis through the center of mass equals the time rate of change of angular momentum regardless of the motion of the center of mass. This theorem applies even if the center of mass is accelerating, provided and L are evaluated relative to the center of mass. In Equation 11.26 we have a third conservation law to add to our list. We can now state that the energy, linear momentum, and angular momentum of an isolated system all remain constant: Ki Ui pi Li Kf pf Lf Uf For an isolated system There are many examples that demonstrate conservation of angular momentum. You may have observed a figure skater spinning in the finale of a program. The angular speed of the skater increases when the skater pulls his hands and feet close to his body, thereby decreasing I. Neglecting friction between skates and ice, no external torques act on the skater. The change in angular speed is due to the fact that, because angular momentum is conserved, the product I remains constant, and a decrease in the moment of inertia of the skater causes an increase in the angular speed. Similarly, when divers or acrobats wish to make several somersaults, they pull their hands and feet close to their bodies to rotate at a higher rate. In these cases, the external force due to gravity acts through the center of mass and hence exerts no torque about this point. Therefore, the angular momentum about the center of mass must be conserved -- that is, I i i I f f . For example, when divers wish to double their angular speed, they must reduce their moment of inertia to one-half its initial value. Quick Quiz 11.4 A particle moves in a straight line, and you are told that the net torque acting on it is zero about some unspecified point. Decide whether the following statements are true or false: (a) The net force on the particle must be zero. (b) The particle's velocity must be constant. Angular momentum is conserved as figure skater Todd Eldredge pulls his arms toward his body. ( 1998 David Madison) 342 CHAPTER 11 Rolling Motion and Angular Momentum A color-enhanced, infrared image of Hurricane Mitch, which devastated large areas of Honduras and Nicaragua in October 1998. The spiral, nonrigid mass of air undergoes rotation and has angular momentum. (Courtesy of NOAA) EXAMPLE 11.8 Formation of a Neutron Star of time a point on the star's equator takes to make one complete circle around the axis of rotation. The angular speed of a star is given by 2 /T. Therefore, because I is proportional to r 2, Equation 11.27 gives Tf Ti rf ri 2 A star rotates with a period of 30 days about an axis through its center. After the star undergoes a supernova explosion, the stellar core, which had a radius of 1.0 104 km, collapses into a neutron star of radius 3.0 km. Determine the period of rotation of the neutron star. The same physics that makes a skater spin faster with his arms pulled in describes the motion of the neutron star. Let us assume that during the collapse of the stellar core, (1) no torque acts on it, (2) it remains spherical, and (3) its mass remains constant. Also, let us use the symbol T for the period, with Ti being the initial period of the star and Tf being the period of the neutron star. The period is the length Solution (30 days) 2.7 10 6 3.0 km 1.0 10 4 km days 0.23 s 2 Thus, the neutron star rotates about four times each second; this result is approximately the same as that for a spinning figure skater. EXAMPLE 11.9 The Merry-Go-Round A horizontal platform in the shape of a circular disk rotates in a horizontal plane about a frictionless vertical axle (Fig. 11.16). The platform has a mass M 100 kg and a radius R 2.0 m. A student whose mass is m 60 kg walks slowly from the rim of the disk toward its center. If the angular speed of the system is 2.0 rad/s when the student is at the rim, what is the angular speed when he has reached a point r 0.50 m from the center? Solution The speed change here is similar to the increase in angular speed of the spinning skater when he pulls his arms inward. Let us denote the moment of inertia of the platform as Ip and that of the student as Is . Treating the student as a point mass, we can write the initial moment of inertia I i of the system (student plus platform) about the axis of rotation: I i I pi I si 1MR 2 mR 2 2 11.5 Conservation of Angular Momentum When the student has walked to the position r ment of inertia of the system reduces to If I pf I sf 1 2 2 MR 343 R, the mo- mr 2 m Note that we still use the greater radius R when calculating Ipf because the radius of the platform has not changed. Because no external torques act on the system about the axis of rotation, we can apply the law of conservation of angular momentum: Ii i i If f M R 1 2 2 MR mR 2 (1MR 2 2 1 2 2 MR 1 2 2 MR mr 2) mR 2 mr 2 f f i f 200 200 240 (2.0 rad/s) 15 4.1 rad/s As expected, the angular speed has increased. As the student walks toward the center of the rotating platform, the angular speed of the system increases because the angular momentum must remain constant. Figure 11.16 Exercise Calculate the initial and final rotational energies of the system. Answer Ki 880 J; K f 1.8 10 3 J. Quick Quiz 11.5 Note that the rotational energy of the system described in Example 11.9 increases. What accounts for this increase in energy? EXAMPLE 11.10 The Spinning Bicycle Wheel stool start rotating. In terms of Li , what are the magnitude and the direction of L for the student plus stool? In a favorite classroom demonstration, a student holds the axle of a spinning bicycle wheel while seated on a stool that is free to rotate (Fig. 11.17). The student and stool are initially at rest while the wheel is spinning in a horizontal plane with an initial angular momentum Li that points upward. When the wheel is inverted about its center by 180, the student and Li Solution The system consists of the student, the wheel, and the stool. Initially, the total angular momentum of the system Li comes entirely from the spinning wheel. As the wheel is inverted, the student applies a torque to the wheel, but this torque is internal to the system. No external torque is acting on the system about the vertical axis. Therefore, the angular momentum of the system is conserved. Initially, we have L system Li L wheel (upward) After the wheel is inverted, we have Linverted wheel L i . For angular momentum to be conserved, some other part of the system has to start rotating so that the total angular momentum remains the initial angular momentum L i . That other part of the system is the student plus the stool she is sitting on. So, we can now state that Lf Li L student 2L i stool Li Figure 11.17 The wheel is initially spinning when the student is at rest. What happens when the wheel is inverted? L student stool 344 CHAPTER 11 Rolling Motion and Angular Momentum EXAMPLE 11.11 Disk and Stick We used the fact that radians are dimensionless to ensure consistent units for each term. Finally, the elastic nature of the collision reminds us that kinetic energy is conserved; in this case, the kinetic energy consists of translational and rotational forms: Ki 1 2 2 m dv di 1 2 (2.0 A 2.0-kg disk traveling at 3.0 m/s strikes a 1.0-kg stick that is lying flat on nearly frictionless ice, as shown in Figure 11.18. Assume that the collision is elastic. Find the translational speed of the disk, the translational speed of the stick, and the rotational speed of the stick after the collision. The moment of inertia of the stick about its center of mass is 1.33 kg m2. Because the disk and stick form an isolated system, we can assume that total energy, linear momentum, and angular momentum are all conserved. We have three unknowns, and so we need three equations to solve simultaneously. The first comes from the law of the conservation of linear momentum: pi pf m dv di (2.0 kg)(3.0 m/s) (1) 6.0 kg m/s (2.0 kg)v d f m dv d f m sv s (1.0 kg)v s Kf 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 m dv d f 2 m sv s 2I 1 1 2 2 2 (2.0 kg)v d f 2 (1.0 kg)v s 1 2 2 2 (1.33 kg m /s) Solution kg)(3.0 m/s)2 54 m2/s2 (3) 6.0v d f 2 3.0v s2 (4.0 m2) 2 (2.0 kg)v d f (1.0 kg)v s Now we apply the law of conservation of angular momentum, using the initial position of the center of the stick as our reference point. We know that the component of angular momentum of the disk along the axis perpendicular to the plane of the ice is negative (the right-hand rule shows that Ld points into the ice). Li Lf rm dv di (2.0 m)(2.0 kg)(3.0 m/s) 12 kg m2/s (2) 9.0 rad/s (3.0 rad/m)v d f rm dv d f I In solving Equations (1), (2), and (3) simultaneously, we find that vd f 2.3 m/s, vs 1.3 m/s, and 2.0 rad/s. These values seem reasonable. The disk is moving more slowly than it was before the collision, and the stick has a small translational speed. Table 11.1 summarizes the initial and final values of variables for the disk and the stick and verifies the conservation of linear momentum, angular momentum, and kinetic energy. Exercise Verify the values in Table 11.1. After Before vdi = 3.0 m/s 2.0 m vs vdf (2.0 m)(2.0 kg)v d f (1.33 kg m2) (4.0 kg m)v d f (1.33 kg m2) Figure 11.18 Overhead view of a disk striking a stick in an elastic collision, which causes the stick to rotate. TABLE 11.1 Comparison of Values in Example 11.11 Before and After the Collisiona v (m/s) Before Disk Stick Total After Disk Stick Total a Notice (rad/s) p (kg m/s) L (kg m2/s) Ktrans ( J) Krot ( J) 3.0 0 -- 2.3 1.3 -- -- 0 -- -- 2.0 -- 6.0 0 6.0 4.7 1.3 6.0 12 0 12 9.3 2.7 12 9.0 0 9.0 5.4 0.9 6.3 -- 0 0 -- 2.7 2.7 that linear momentum, angular momentum, and total kinetic energy are conserved. 11.6 The Motion of Gyroscopes and Tops 345 Optional Section 11.6 THE MOTION OF GYROSCOPES AND TOPS A very unusual and fascinating type of motion you probably have observed is that of a top spinning about its axis of symmetry, as shown in Figure 11.19a. If the top spins very rapidly, the axis rotates about the z axis, sweeping out a cone (see Fig. 11.19b). The motion of the axis about the vertical -- known as precessional motion -- is usually slow relative to the spin motion of the top. It is quite natural to wonder why the top does not fall over. Because the center of mass is not directly above the pivot point O, a net torque is clearly acting on the top about O -- a torque resulting from the force of gravity Mg. The top would certainly fall over if it were not spinning. Because it is spinning, however, it has an angular momentum L directed along its symmetry axis. As we shall show, the motion of this symmetry axis about the z axis (the precessional motion) occurs because the torque produces a change in the direction of the symmetry axis. This is an excellent example of the importance of the directional nature of angular momentum. The two forces acting on the top are the downward force of gravity Mg and the normal force n acting upward at the pivot point O. The normal force produces no torque about the pivot because its moment arm through that point is zero. However, the force of gravity produces a torque r Mg about O, where the direction of is perpendicular to the plane formed by r and Mg. By necessity, the vector lies in a horizontal xy plane perpendicular to the angular momentum vector. The net torque and angular momentum of the top are related through Equation 11.19: dL dt From this expression, we see that the nonzero torque produces a change in angular momentum d L -- a change that is in the same direction as . Therefore, like the torque vector, d L must also be at right angles to L. Figure 11.19b illustrates the resulting precessional motion of the symmetry axis of the top. In a time t, the change in angular momentum is L L f L i t. Because L is perpendicular to L, the magnitude of L does not change ( L i L f ). Rather, what is changing is the direction of L. Because the change in angular momentum L is in the direction of , which lies in the xy plane, the top undergoes precessional motion. The essential features of precessional motion can be illustrated by considering the simple gyroscope shown in Figure 11.20a. This device consists of a wheel free to spin about an axle that is pivoted at a distance h from the center of mass of the wheel. When given an angular velocity about the axle, the wheel has an angular momentum L I directed along the axle as shown. Let us consider the torque acting on the wheel about the pivot O. Again, the force n exerted by the support on the axle produces no torque about O, and the force of gravity Mg produces a torque of magnitude Mgh about O, where the axle is perpendicular to the support. The direction of this torque is perpendicular to the axle (and perpendicular to L), as shown in Figure 11.20a. This torque causes the angular momentum to change in the direction perpendicular to the axle. Hence, the axle moves in the direction of the torque -- that is, in the horizontal plane. To simplify the description of the system, we must make an assumption: The total angular momentum of the precessing wheel is the sum of the angular momentum I due to the spinning and the angular momentum due to the motion of Precessional motion z L CM n Mg r O x (a) y L Li Lf (b) Precessional motion of a top spinning about its symmetry axis. (a) The only external forces acting on the top are the normal force n and the force of gravity Mg. The direction of the angular momentum L is along the axis of symmetry. The right-hand r F rule indicates that r Mg is in the xy plane. (b). The direction of L is parallel to that of in part (a). The fact that Lf L L i indicates that the top precesses about the z axis. Figure 11.19 346 CHAPTER 11 Rolling Motion and Angular Momentum h n O Li Lf Mg dL (a) (b) Li d Lf Figure 11.20 (a) The motion of a simple gyroscope pivoted a distance h from its center of mass. The force of gravity Mg produces a torque about the pivot, and this torque is perpendicular to the axle. (b) This torque results in a change in angular momentum d L in a direction perpendicular to the axle. The axle sweeps out an angle d in a time dt. L r Mg n This toy gyroscope undergoes precessional motion about the vertical axis as it spins about its axis of symmetry. The only forces acting on it are the force of gravity Mg and the upward force of the pivot n. The direction of its angular momentum L is along the axis of symmetry. The torque and L are directed into the page. (Courtesy of Central Scientific Company) the center of mass about the pivot. In our treatment, we shall neglect the contribution from the center-of-mass motion and take the total angular momentum to be just I . In practice, this is a good approximation if is made very large. In a time dt, the torque due to the gravitational force changes the angular momentum of the system by dL dt. When added vectorially to the original total 11.7 Angular Momentum as a Fundamental Quantity 347 angular momentum I , this additional angular momentum causes a shift in the direction of the total angular momentum. The vector diagram in Figure 11.20b shows that in the time dt, the angular momentum vector rotates through an angle d , which is also the angle through which the axle rotates. From the vector triangle formed by the vectors Li , Lf , and d L, we see that (Mgh)dt dL sin (d ) d L L where we have used the fact that, for small values of any angle , sin . Dividing through by dt and using the relationship L I , we find that the rate at which the axle rotates about the vertical axis is p d dt Mgh I (11.28) Precessional frequency The angular speed p is called the precessional frequency. This result is valid only when p V . Otherwise, a much more complicated motion is involved. As you can see from Equation 11.28, the condition p V is met when I is great compared with Mgh. Furthermore, note that the precessional frequency decreases as increases -- that is, as the wheel spins faster about its axis of symmetry. Quick Quiz 11.6 How much work is done by the force of gravity when a top precesses through one complete circle? Optional Section 11.7 ANGULAR MOMENTUM AS A FUNDAMENTAL QUANTITY We have seen that the concept of angular momentum is very useful for describing the motion of macroscopic systems. However, the concept also is valid on a submicroscopic scale and has been used extensively in the development of modern theories of atomic, molecular, and nuclear physics. In these developments, it was found that the angular momentum of a system is a fundamental quantity. The word fundamental in this context implies that angular momentum is an intrinsic property of atoms, molecules, and their constituents, a property that is a part of their very nature. To explain the results of a variety of experiments on atomic and molecular systems, we rely on the fact that the angular momentum has discrete values. These discrete values are multiples of the fundamental unit of angular momentum h/2 , where h is called Planck's constant: Fundamental unit of angular momentum 1.054 10 34 kg m2/s d Let us accept this postulate without proof for the time being and show how it can be used to estimate the angular speed of a diatomic molecule. Consider the O2 molecule as a rigid rotor, that is, two atoms separated by a fixed distance d and rotating about the center of mass (Fig. 11.21). Equating the angular momentum to the fundamental unit , we can estimate the lowest angular speed: I CM or I CM m m CM Figure 11.21 The rigid-rotor model of a diatomic molecule. The rotation occurs about the center of mass in the plane of the page. 348 CHAPTER 11 Rolling Motion and Angular Momentum In Example 10.3, we found that the moment of inertia of the O2 molecule about this axis of rotation is 1.95 10 46 kg m2. Therefore, I CM 1.054 1.95 10 10 34 46 kg m2/s kg m2 5.41 10 11 rad/s Actual angular speeds are multiples of this smallest possible value. This simple example shows that certain classical concepts and models, when properly modified, might be useful in describing some features of atomic and molecular systems. A wide variety of phenomena on the submicroscopic scale can be explained only if we assume discrete values of the angular momentum associated with a particular type of motion. The Danish physicist Niels Bohr (1885 1962) accepted and adopted this radical idea of discrete angular momentum values in developing his theory of the hydrogen atom. Strictly classical models were unsuccessful in describing many properties of the hydrogen atom. Bohr postulated that the electron could occupy only those circular orbits about the proton for which the orbital angular momentum was equal to n , where n is an integer. That is, he made the bold assumption that orbital angular momentum is quantized. From this simple model, the rotational frequencies of the electron in the various orbits can be estimated (see Problem 43). SUMMARY The total kinetic energy of a rigid object rolling on a rough surface without slipping equals the rotational kinetic energy about its center of mass, 1 I CM 2, plus the 2 1 translational kinetic energy of the center of mass, 2 Mv CM2: K The torque to be 1 2 2 I CM 1 2 2 Mv CM (11.4) due to a force F about an origin in an inertial frame is defined r F (11.7) B is a vector C having a (11.9) Given two vectors A and B, the cross product A magnitude C AB sin where is the angle between A and B. The direction of the vector C A B is perpendicular to the plane formed by A and B, and this direction is determined by the right-hand rule. The angular momentum L of a particle having linear momentum p mv is L r p (11.15) where r is the vector position of the particle relative to an origin in an inertial frame. The net external torque acting on a particle or rigid object is equal to the time rate of change of its angular momentum: ext dL dt (11.20) The z component of angular momentum of a rigid object rotating about a fixed z axis is Lz I (11.21) Questions 349 where I is the moment of inertia of the object about the axis of rotation and is its angular speed. The net external torque acting on a rigid object equals the product of its moment of inertia about the axis of rotation and its angular acceleration: ext I (11.23) If the net external torque acting on a system is zero, then the total angular momentum of the system is constant. Applying this law of conservation of angular momentum to a system whose moment of inertia changes gives Ii i If f constant (11.27) QUESTIONS 1. Is it possible to calculate the torque acting on a rigid body without specifying a center of rotation? Is the torque independent of the location of the center of rotation? 2. Is the triple product defined by A (B C) a scalar or a vector quantity? Explain why the operation (A B) C has no meaning. 3. In some motorcycle races, the riders drive over small hills, and the motorcycles become airborne for a short time. If a motorcycle racer keeps the throttle open while leaving the hill and going into the air, the motorcycle tends to nose upward. Why does this happen? 4. If the torque acting on a particle about a certain origin is zero, what can you say about its angular momentum about that origin? 5. Suppose that the velocity vector of a particle is completely specified. What can you conclude about the direction of its angular momentum vector with respect to the direction of motion? 6. If a single force acts on an object, and the torque caused by that force is nonzero about some point, is there any other point about which the torque is zero? 7. If a system of particles is in motion, is it possible for the total angular momentum to be zero about some origin? Explain. 8. A ball is thrown in such a way that it does not spin about its own axis. Does this mean that the angular momentum is zero about an arbitrary origin? Explain. 9. In a tape recorder, the tape is pulled past the read-andwrite heads at a constant speed by the drive mechanism. Consider the reel from which the tape is pulled -- as the tape is pulled off it, the radius of the roll of remaining tape decreases. How does the torque on the reel change with time? How does the angular speed of the reel change with time? If the tape mechanism is suddenly turned on so that the tape is quickly pulled with a great force, is the tape more likely to break when pulled from a nearly full reel or a nearly empty reel? 10. A scientist at a hotel sought assistance from a bellhop to carry a mysterious suitcase. When the unaware bellhop rounded a corner carrying the suitcase, it suddenly moved away from him for some unknown reason. At this point, the alarmed bellhop dropped the suitcase and ran off. What do you suppose might have been in the suitcase? 11. When a cylinder rolls on a horizontal surface as in Figure 11.3, do any points on the cylinder have only a vertical component of velocity at some instant? If so, where are they? 12. Three objects of uniform density -- a solid sphere, a solid cylinder, and a hollow cylinder -- are placed at the top of an incline (Fig. Q11.12). If they all are released from rest at the same elevation and roll without slipping, which object reaches the bottom first? Which reaches it last? You should try this at home and note that the result is independent of the masses and the radii of the objects. Figure Q11.12 Which object wins the race? 13. A mouse is initially at rest on a horizontal turntable mounted on a frictionless vertical axle. If the mouse begins to walk around the perimeter, what happens to the turntable? Explain. 14. Stars originate as large bodies of slowly rotating gas. Because of gravity, these regions of gas slowly decrease in size. What happens to the angular speed of a star as it shrinks? Explain. 15. Often, when a high diver wants to execute a flip in midair, she draws her legs up against her chest. Why does this make her rotate faster? What should she do when she wants to come out of her flip? 16. As a tether ball winds around a thin pole, what happens to its angular speed? Explain. 350 CHAPTER 11 Rolling Motion and Angular Momentum 20. Two balls have the same size and mass. One is hollow, whereas the other is solid. How would you determine which is which without breaking them apart? 21. A particle is moving in a circle with constant speed. Locate one point about which the particle's angular momentum is constant and another about which it changes with time. 22. If global warming occurs over the next century, it is likely that some polar ice will melt and the water will be distributed closer to the equator. How would this change the moment of inertia of the Earth? Would the length of the day (one revolution) increase or decrease? 17. Two solid spheres -- a large, massive sphere and a small sphere with low mass -- are rolled down a hill. Which sphere reaches the bottom of the hill first? Next, a large, low-density sphere and a small, high-density sphere having the same mass are rolled down the hill. Which one reaches the bottom first in this case? 18. Suppose you are designing a car for a coasting race -- the cars in this race have no engines; they simply coast down a hill. Do you want to use large wheels or small wheels? Do you want to use solid, disk-like wheels or hoop-like wheels? Should the wheels be heavy or light? 19. Why do tightrope walkers carry a long pole to help themselves keep their balance? PROBLEMS 1, 2, 3 = straightforward, intermediate, challenging = full solution available in the Student Solutions Manual and Study Guide WEB = solution posted at http://www.saunderscollege.com/physics/ = Computer useful in solving problem = Interactive Physics = paired numerical/symbolic problems Section 11.1 Rolling Motion of a Rigid Object WEB v 1. A cylinder of mass 10.0 kg rolls without slipping on a horizontal surface. At the instant its center of mass has a speed of 10.0 m/s, determine (a) the translational kinetic energy of its center of mass, (b) the rotational energy about its center of mass, and (c) its total energy. 2. A bowling ball has a mass of 4.00 kg, a moment of inertia of 1.60 10 2 kg m2, and a radius of 0.100 m. If it rolls down the lane without slipping at a linear speed of 4.00 m/s, what is its total energy? 3. A bowling ball has a mass M, a radius R, and a moment of inertia 2MR 2. If it starts from rest, how much work 5 must be done on it to set it rolling without slipping at a linear speed v? Express the work in terms of M and v. 4. A uniform solid disk and a uniform hoop are placed side by side at the top of an incline of height h. If they are released from rest and roll without slipping, determine their speeds when they reach the bottom. Which object reaches the bottom first? 5. (a) Determine the acceleration of the center of mass of a uniform solid disk rolling down an incline making an angle with the horizontal. Compare this acceleration with that of a uniform hoop. (b) What is the minimum coefficient of friction required to maintain pure rolling motion for the disk? 6. A ring of mass 2.40 kg, inner radius 6.00 cm, and outer radius 8.00 cm rolls (without slipping) up an inclined plane that makes an angle of 36.9 (Fig. P11.6). At the moment the ring is at position x 2.00 m up the plane, its speed is 2.80 m/s. The ring continues up the plane for some additional distance and then rolls back down. It does not roll off the top end. How far up the plane does it go? x Figure P11.6 7. A metal can containing condensed mushroom soup has a mass of 215 g, a height of 10.8 cm, and a diameter of 6.38 cm. It is placed at rest on its side at the top of a 3.00-m-long incline that is at an angle of 25.0 to the horizontal and is then released to roll straight down. Assuming energy conservation, calculate the moment of inertia of the can if it takes 1.50 s to reach the bottom of the incline. Which pieces of data, if any, are unnecessary for calculating the solution? 8. A tennis ball is a hollow sphere with a thin wall. It is set rolling without slipping at 4.03 m/s on the horizontal section of a track, as shown in Figure P11.8. It rolls around the inside of a vertical circular loop 90.0 cm in diameter and finally leaves the track at a point 20.0 cm below the horizontal section. (a) Find the speed of the ball at the top of the loop. Demonstrate that it will not fall from the track. (b) Find its speed as it leaves the track. (c) Suppose that static friction between the ball and the track was negligible, so that the ball slid instead of rolling. Would its speed Problems B F3 D O 351 A F1 C F2 Figure P11.8 then be higher, lower, or the same at the top of the loop? Explain. Figure P11.18 Section 11.3 Angular Momentum of a Particle 19. A light, rigid rod 1.00 m in length joins two particles -- with masses 4.00 kg and 3.00 kg -- at its ends. The combination rotates in the xy plane about a pivot through the center of the rod (Fig. P11.19). Determine the angular momentum of the system about the origin when the speed of each particle is 5.00 m/s. y v 3.00 kg Section 11.2 The Vector Product and Torque 9. Given M 6i 2j k and N 2i j 3k, calculate the vector product M N. 10. The vectors 42.0 cm at 15.0 and 23.0 cm at 65.0 both start from the origin. Both angles are measured counterclockwise from the x axis. The vectors form two sides of a parallelogram. (a) Find the area of the parallelogram. (b) Find the length of its longer diagonal. 11. Two vectors are given by A 3i 4j and B 2i 3j. Find (a) A B and (b) the angle between A and B. 12. For the vectors A 3i 7j 4k and B 6i 10j 9k, evaluate the expressions (a) cos 1 (A B/AB ) and (b) sin 1 ( A B /AB). (c) Which give(s) the angle between the vectors? 13. A force of F 2.00i 3.00j N is applied to an object that is pivoted about a fixed axis aligned along the z coordinate axis. If the force is applied at the point r (4.00i 5.00j 0k) m, find (a) the magnitude of the net torque about the z axis and (b) the direction of the torque vector . 14. A student claims that she has found a vector A such that (2i 3j 4k) A (4i 3j k). Do you believe this claim? Explain. 15. Vector A is in the negative y direction, and vector B is in the negative x direction. What are the directions of (a) A B and (b) B A? 16. A particle is located at the vector position r (i 3j) m, and the force acting on it is F (3i 2j) N. What is the torque about (a) the origin and (b) the point having coordinates (0, 6) m? 17. If A B A B, what is the angle between A and B? 18. Two forces F1 and F2 act along the two sides of an equilateral triangle, as shown in Figure P11.18. Point O is the intersection of the altitudes of the triangle. Find a third force F3 to be applied at B and along BC that will make the total torque about the point O be zero. Will the total torque change if F3 is applied not at B, but rather at any other point along BC ? WEB x 4.00 kg v Figure P11.19 20. A 1.50-kg particle moves in the xy plane with a velocity of v (4.20i 3.60j) m/s. Determine the particle's angular momentum when its position vector is r (1.50i 2.20j) m. 21. The position vector of a particle of mass 2.00 kg is given as a function of time by r (6.00i 5.00t j) m. Determine the angular momentum of the particle about the origin as a function of time. 22. A conical pendulum consists of a bob of mass m in motion in a circular path in a horizontal plane, as shown in Figure P11.22. During the motion, the supporting wire of length maintains the constant angle with the vertical. Show that the magnitude of the angular momen- WEB 1. 00 m 352 CHAPTER 11 tum of the mass about the center of the circle is L (m 2g 3 Rolling Motion and Angular Momentum v1 = vxi i sin4 /cos )1/2 vi O R v2 Figure P11.25 cle about the origin when the particle is (a) at the origin, (b) at the highest point of its trajectory, and (c) just about to hit the ground. (d) What torque causes its angular momentum to change? 26. Heading straight toward the summit of Pike's Peak, an airplane of mass 12 000 kg flies over the plains of Kansas at a nearly constant altitude of 4.30 km and with a constant velocity of 175 m/s westward. (a) What is the airplane's vector angular momentum relative to a wheat farmer on the ground directly below the airplane? (b) Does this value change as the airplane continues its motion along a straight line? (c) What is its angular momentum relative to the summit of Pike's Peak? 27. A ball of mass m is fastened at the end of a flagpole connected to the side of a tall building at point P, as shown in Figure P11.27. The length of the flagpole is , and is the angle the flagpole makes with the horizontal. Suppose that the ball becomes loose and starts to fall. Determine the angular momentum (as a function of time) of the ball about point P. Neglect air resistance. m Figure P11.22 23. A particle of mass m moves in a circle of radius R at a constant speed v, as shown in Figure P11.23. If the motion begins at point Q, determine the angular momentum of the particle about point P as a function of time. y v m R P Q x m Figure P11.23 24. A 4.00-kg mass is attached to a light cord that is wound around a pulley (see Fig. 10.20). The pulley is a uniform solid cylinder with a radius of 8.00 cm and a mass of 2.00 kg. (a) What is the net torque on the system about the point O? (b) When the mass has a speed v, the pulley has an angular speed v/R. Determine the total angular momentum of the system about O. (c) Using the fact that d L/dt and your result from part (b), calculate the acceleration of the mass. 25. A particle of mass m is shot with an initial velocity vi and makes an angle with the horizontal, as shown in Figure P11.25. The particle moves in the gravitational field of the Earth. Find the angular momentum of the parti- P Figure P11.27 28. A fireman clings to a vertical ladder and directs the nozzle of a hose horizontally toward a burning building. The rate of water flow is 6.31 kg/s, and the nozzle speed is 12.5 m/s. The hose passes between the fireman's feet, which are 1.30 m vertically below the nozzle. Choose the origin to be inside the hose between the fireman's Problems feet. What torque must the fireman exert on the hose? That is, what is the rate of change of angular momentum of the water? 353 34. Section 11.4 Angular Momentum of a Rotating Rigid Object 29. A uniform solid sphere with a radius of 0.500 m and a mass of 15.0 kg turns counterclockwise about a vertical axis through its center. Find its vector angular momentum when its angular speed is 3.00 rad/s. 30. A uniform solid disk with a mass of 3.00 kg and a radius of 0.200 m rotates about a fixed axis perpendicular to its face. If the angular speed is 6.00 rad/s, calculate the angular momentum of the disk when the axis of rotation (a) passes through its center of mass and (b) passes through a point midway between the center and the rim. 31. A particle with a mass of 0.400 kg is attached to the 100-cm mark of a meter stick with a mass of 0.100 kg. The meter stick rotates on a horizontal, frictionless table with an angular speed of 4.00 rad/s. Calculate the angular momentum of the system when the stick is pivoted about an axis (a) perpendicular to the table through the 50.0-cm mark and (b) perpendicular to the table through the 0-cm mark. 32. The hour and minute hands of Big Ben, the famous Parliament Building tower clock in London, are 2.70 m and 4.50 m long and have masses of 60.0 kg and 100 kg, respectively. Calculate the total angular momentum of these hands about the center point. Treat the hands as long thin rods. 35. 36. Section 11.5 Conservation of Angular Momentum 33. A cylinder with a moment of inertia of I1 rotates about a vertical, frictionless axle with angular velocity i . A second cylinder that has a moment of inertia of I 2 and initially is not rotating drops onto the first cylinder (Fig. P11.33). Because of friction between the surfaces, the two eventually reach the same angular speed f . (a) Calculate f . (b) Show that the kinetic energy of the system decreases in this interaction and calculate WEB 37. 38. the ratio of the final rotational energy to the initial rotational energy. A playground merry-go-round of radius R 2.00 m has a moment of inertia of I 250 kg m2 and is rotating at 10.0 rev/min about a frictionless vertical axle. Facing the axle, a 25.0-kg child hops onto the merry-go-round and manages to sit down on its edge. What is the new angular speed of the merry-go-round? A student sits on a freely rotating stool holding two weights, each of which has a mass of 3.00 kg. When his arms are extended horizontally, the weights are 1.00 m from the axis of rotation and he rotates with an angular speed of 0.750 rad/s. The moment of inertia of the student plus stool is 3.00 kg m2 and is assumed to be constant. The student pulls the weights inward horizontally to a position 0.300 m from the rotation axis. (a) Find the new angular speed of the student. (b) Find the kinetic energy of the rotating system before and after he pulls the weights inward. A uniform rod with a mass of 100 g and a length of 50.0 cm rotates in a horizontal plane about a fixed, vertical, frictionless pin passing through its center. Two small beads, each having a mass 30.0 g, are mounted on the rod so that they are able to slide without friction along its length. Initially, the beads are held by catches at positions 10.0 cm on each side of center; at this time, the system rotates at an angular speed of 20.0 rad/s. Suddenly, the catches are released, and the small beads slide outward along the rod. Find (a) the angular speed of the system at the instant the beads reach the ends of the rod and (b) the angular speed of the rod after the beads fly off the rod's ends. A 60.0-kg woman stands at the rim of a horizontal turntable having a moment of inertia of 500 kg m2 and a radius of 2.00 m. The turntable is initially at rest and is free to rotate about a frictionless, vertical axle through its center. The woman then starts walking around the rim clockwise (as viewed from above the system) at a constant speed of 1.50 m/s relative to the Earth. (a) In what direction and with what angular speed does the turntable rotate? (b) How much work does the woman do to set herself and the turntable into motion? A puck with a mass of 80.0 g and a radius of 4.00 cm slides along an air table at a speed of 1.50 m/s, as shown in Figure P11.38a. It makes a glancing collision I2 1.50 m/s i I1 f Before After (a) (b) Figure P11.33 Figure P11.38 354 CHAPTER 11 Rolling Motion and Angular Momentum with a second puck having a radius of 6.00 cm and a mass of 120 g (initially at rest) such that their rims just touch. Because their rims are coated with instant-acting glue, the pucks stick together and spin after the collision (Fig. P11.38b). (a) What is the angular momentum of the system relative to the center of mass? (b) What is the angular speed about the center of mass? 39. A wooden block of mass M resting on a frictionless horizontal surface is attached to a rigid rod of length and of negligible mass (Fig. P11.39). The rod is pivoted at the other end. A bullet of mass m traveling parallel to the horizontal surface and normal to the rod with speed v hits the block and becomes embedded in it. (a) What is the angular momentum of the bullet block system? (b) What fraction of the original kinetic energy is lost in the collision? Figure P11.40 m vi M v d R M Figure P11.41 maximum possible decrease in the angular speed of the Earth due to this collision? Explain your answer. (Optional) Figure P11.39 40. A space station shaped like a giant wheel has a radius of 100 m and a moment of inertia of 5.00 108 kg m2. A crew of 150 are living on the rim, and the station's rotation causes the crew to experience an acceleration of 1g (Fig. P11.40). When 100 people move to the center of the station for a union meeting, the angular speed changes. What acceleration is experienced by the managers remaining at the rim? Assume that the average mass of each inhabitant is 65.0 kg. 41. A wad of sticky clay of mass m and velocity vi is fired at a solid cylinder of mass M and radius R (Fig. P11.41). The cylinder is initially at rest and is mounted on a fixed horizontal axle that runs through the center of mass. The line of motion of the projectile is perpendicular to the axle and at a distance d, less than R, from the center. (a) Find the angular speed of the system just after the clay strikes and sticks to the surface of the cylinder. (b) Is mechanical energy conserved in this process? Explain your answer. 42. Suppose a meteor with a mass of 3.00 1013 kg is moving at 30.0 km/s relative to the center of the Earth and strikes the Earth. What is the order of magnitude of the Section 11.7 Angular Momentum as a Fundamental Quantity 43. In the Bohr model of the hydrogen atom, the electron moves in a circular orbit of radius 0.529 10 10 m around the proton. Assuming that the orbital angular momentum of the electron is equal to h/2 , calculate (a) the orbital speed of the electron, (b) the kinetic energy of the electron, and (c) the angular speed of the electron's motion. ADDITIONAL PROBLEMS 44. Review Problem. A rigid, massless rod has three equal masses attached to it, as shown in Figure P11.44. The rod is free to rotate in a vertical plane about a frictionless axle perpendicular to the rod through the point P, and it is released from rest in the horizontal position at t 0. Assuming m and d are known, find (a) the moment of inertia of the system about the pivot, (b) the torque acting on the system at t 0, (c) the angular acceleration of the system at t 0, (d) the linear acceleration of the mass labeled "3" at t 0, (e) the maximum Problems kinetic energy of the system, (f) the maximum angular speed attained by the rod, (g) the maximum angular momentum of the system, and (h) the maximum speed attained by the mass labeled "2." 2d 3 3 355 time. (f) Find the work done by the drive motor during the 440-s motion. (g) Find the work done by the string brake on the sliding mass. (h) Find the total work done on the system consisting of the disk and the sliding mass. m 1 2 m P m B d d Figure P11.44 45. A uniform solid sphere of radius r is placed on the inside surface of a hemispherical bowl having a much greater radius R. The sphere is released from rest at an angle to the vertical and rolls without slipping (Fig. P11.45). Determine the angular speed of the sphere when it reaches the bottom of the bowl. A Figure P11.46 47. A string is wound around a uniform disk of radius R and mass M. The disk is released from rest when the string is vertical and its top end is tied to a fixed bar (Fig. P11.47). Show that (a) the tension in the string is one-third the weight of the disk, (b) the magnitude of the acceleration of the center of mass is 2g/3, and (c) the speed of the center of mass is (4gh/3)1/2 as the disk descends. Verify your answer to part (c) using the energy approach. r R Figure P11.45 46. A 100-kg uniform horizontal disk of radius 5.50 m turns without friction at 2.50 rev/s on a vertical axis through its center, as shown in Figure P11.46. A feedback mechanism senses the angular speed of the disk, and a drive motor at A ensures that the angular speed remains constant. While the disk turns, a 1.20-kg mass on top of the disk slides outward in a radial slot. The 1.20-kg mass starts at the center of the disk at time t 0 and moves outward with a constant speed of 1.25 cm/s relative to the disk until it reaches the edge at t 440 s. The sliding mass experiences no friction. Its motion is constrained by a brake at B so that its radial speed remains constant. The constraint produces tension in a light string tied to the mass. (a) Find the torque as a function of time that the drive motor must provide while the mass is sliding. (b) Find the value of this torque at t 440 s, just before the sliding mass finishes its motion. (c) Find the power that the drive motor must deliver as a function of time. (d) Find the value of the power when the sliding mass is just reaching the end of the slot. (e) Find the string tension as a function of h R M Figure P11.47 48. Comet Halley moves about the Sun in an elliptical orbit, with its closest approach to the Sun being about 0.590 AU and its greatest distance from the Sun being 35.0 AU (1 AU the average Earth Sun distance). If the comet's speed at its closest approach is 54.0 km/s, 356 CHAPTER 11 Rolling Motion and Angular Momentum The monkey climbs the rope in an attempt to reach the bananas. (a) Treating the system as consisting of the monkey, bananas, rope, and pulley, evaluate the net torque about the pulley axis. (b) Using the results to part (a), determine the total angular momentum about the pulley axis and describe the motion of the system. Will the monkey reach the bananas? 51. A solid sphere of mass m and radius r rolls without slipping along the track shown in Figure P11.51. The sphere starts from rest with its lowest point at height h above the bottom of a loop of radius R, which is much larger than r. (a) What is the minimum value that h can have (in terms of R) if the sphere is to complete the loop? (b) What are the force components on the sphere at point P if h 3R ? what is its speed when it is farthest from the Sun? The angular momentum of the comet about the Sun is conserved because no torque acts on the comet. The gravitational force exerted by the Sun on the comet has a moment arm of zero. 49. A constant horizontal force F is applied to a lawn roller having the form of a uniform solid cylinder of radius R and mass M (Fig. P11.49). If the roller rolls without slipping on the horizontal surface, show that (a) the acceleration of the center of mass is 2F/3M and that (b) the minimum coefficient of friction necessary to prevent slipping is F/3Mg. (Hint: Consider the torque with respect to the center of mass.) F R M m r h R P Figure P11.49 Figure P11.51 50. A light rope passes over a light, frictionless pulley. A bunch of bananas of mass M is fastened at one end, and a monkey of mass M clings to the other (Fig. P11.50). M M Figure P11.50 52. A thin rod with a mass of 0.630 kg and a length of 1.24 m is at rest, hanging vertically from a strong fixed hinge at its top end. Suddenly, a horizontal impulsive force (14.7i) N is applied to it. (a) Suppose that the force acts at the bottom end of the rod. Find the acceleration of the rod's center of mass and the horizontal force that the hinge exerts. (b) Suppose that the force acts at the midpoint of the rod. Find the acceleration of this point and the horizontal hinge reaction. (c) Where can the impulse be applied so that the hinge exerts no horizontal force? (This point is called the center of percussion.) 53. At one moment, a bowling ball is both sliding and spinning on a horizontal surface such that its rotational kinetic energy equals its translational kinetic energy. Let v CM represent the ball's center-of-mass speed relative to the surface. Let vr represent the speed of the topmost point on the ball's surface relative to the center of mass. Find the ratio v CM /vr . 54. A projectile of mass m moves to the right with speed vi (Fig. P11.54a). The projectile strikes and sticks to the end of a stationary rod of mass M and length d that is pivoted about a frictionless axle through its center (Fig. P11.54b). (a) Find the angular speed of the system right after the collision. (b) Determine the fractional loss in mechanical energy due to the collision. Problems 357 m vi O d O (a) (b) Figure P11.54 WEB cal grape at the top of his bald head, which itself has the shape of a sphere. After all of the children have had time to giggle, the grape starts from rest and rolls down your uncle's head without slipping. It loses contact with your uncle's scalp when the radial line joining it to the center of curvature makes an angle with the vertical. What is the measure of angle ? 58. A thin rod of length h and mass M is held vertically with its lower end resting on a frictionless horizontal surface. The rod is then released to fall freely. (a) Determine the speed of its center of mass just before it hits the horizontal surface. (b) Now suppose that the rod has a fixed pivot at its lower end. Determine the speed of the rod's center of mass just before it hits the surface. 59. Two astronauts (Fig. P11.59), each having a mass of 75.0 kg, are connected by a 10.0-m rope of negligible mass. They are isolated in space, orbiting their center of mass at speeds of 5.00 m/s. (a) Treating the astronauts as particles, calculate the magnitude of the angular momentum and (b) the rotational energy of the system. By pulling on the rope, one of the astronauts shortens the distance between them to 5.00 m. (c) What is the new angular momentum of the system? (d) What are the astronauts' new speeds? (e) What is the new rotational energy of the system? (f) How much work is done by the astronaut in shortening the rope? 60. Two astronauts (see Fig. P11.59), each having a mass M, are connected by a rope of length d having negligible mass. They are isolated in space, orbiting their center of mass at speeds v. Treating the astronauts as particles, calculate (a) the magnitude of the angular momentum and (b) the rotational energy of the system. By pulling on the rope, one of the astronauts shortens the distance between them to d/2. (c) What is the new angular momentum of the system? (d) What are the astronauts' new speeds? (e) What is the new rotational energy of the system? (f) How much work is done by the astronaut in shortening the rope? 55. A mass m is attached to a cord passing through a small hole in a frictionless, horizontal surface (Fig. P11.55). The mass is initially orbiting with speed vi in a circle of radius ri . The cord is then slowly pulled from below, and the radius of the circle decreases to r. (a) What is the speed of the mass when the radius is r ? (b) Find the tension in the cord as a function of r. (c) How much work W is done in moving m from ri to r ? (Note: The tension depends on r.) (d) Obtain numerical values for v, T, and W when r 0.100 m, m 50.0 g, ri 0.300 m, and vi 1.50 m/s. ri m vi Figure P11.55 CM 56. A bowler releases a bowling ball with no spin, sending it sliding straight down the alley toward the pins. The ball continues to slide for some distance before its motion becomes rolling without slipping; of what order of magnitude is this distance? State the quantities you take as data, the values you measure or estimate for them, and your reasoning. 57. Following Thanksgiving dinner, your uncle falls into a deep sleep while sitting straight up and facing the television set. A naughty grandchild balances a small spheri- d Figure P11.59 Problems 59 and 60. 61. A solid cube of wood of side 2a and mass M is resting on a horizontal surface. The cube is constrained to ro- 358 CHAPTER 11 Rolling Motion and Angular Momentum tate about an axis AB (Fig. P11.61). A bullet of mass m and speed v is shot at the face opposite ABCD at a height of 4a/3. The bullet becomes embedded in the cube. Find the minimum value of v required to tip the cube so that it falls on face ABCD. Assume m V M. C 2a v 4a/3 D B A Figure P11.64 Problems 64 and 65. Figure P11.61 62. A large, cylindrical roll of paper of initial radius R lies on a long, horizontal surface with the open end of the paper nailed to the surface. The roll is given a slight shove (vi 0) and begins to unroll. (a) Determine the speed of the center of mass of the roll when its radius has diminished to r. (b) Calculate a numerical value for this speed at r 1.00 mm, assuming R 6.00 m. (c) What happens to the energy of the system when the paper is completely unrolled? (Hint: Assume that the roll has a uniform density and apply energy methods.) 63. A spool of wire of mass M and radius R is unwound under a constant force F (Fig. P11.63). Assuming that the spool is a uniform solid cylinder that does not slip, show that (a) the acceleration of the center of mass is 4F/3M and that (b) the force of friction is to the right and is equal in magnitude to F/3. (c) If the cylinder starts from rest and rolls without slipping, what is the speed of its center of mass after it has rolled through a distance d ? F a horizontal surface and released, as shown in Figure P11.64. (a) What is the angular speed of the disk once pure rolling takes place? (b) Find the fractional loss in kinetic energy from the time the disk is released until the time pure rolling occurs. (Hint: Consider torques about the center of mass.) 65. Suppose a solid disk of radius R is given an angular speed i about an axis through its center and is then lowered to a horizontal surface and released, as shown in Problem 64 (see Fig. P11.64). Furthermore, assume that the coefficient of friction between the disk and the surface is . (a) Show that the time it takes for pure rolling motion to occur is R i /3 g. (b) Show that the distance the disk travels before pure rolling occurs is R 2 i 2/18 g. 66. A solid cube of side 2a and mass M is sliding on a frictionless surface with uniform velocity v, as shown in Figure P11.66a. It hits a small obstacle at the end of the table; this causes the cube to tilt, as shown in Figure M 2a M R Mg v (b) Figure P11.63 64. A uniform solid disk is set into rotation with an angular speed i about an axis through its center. While still rotating at this speed, the disk is placed into contact with (a) Figure P11.66 Problems P11.66b. Find the minimum value of v such that the cube falls off the table. Note that the moment of inertia of the cube about an axis along one of its edges is 8Ma 2/3. (Hint: The cube undergoes an inelastic collision at the edge.) 67. A plank with a mass M 6.00 kg rides on top of two identical solid cylindrical rollers that have R 5.00 cm and m 2.00 kg (Fig. P11.67). The plank is pulled by a constant horizontal force of magnitude F 6.00 N applied to the end of the plank and perpendicular to the axes of the cylinders (which are parallel). The cylinders roll without slipping on a flat surface. Also, no slipping occurs between the cylinders and the plank. (a) Find the acceleration of the plank and that of the rollers. (b) What frictional forces are acting? 359 that the critical angle for which the spool does not slip and remains stationary is cos c r R M F m R m R (Hint: At the critical angle, the line of action of the applied force passes through the contact point.) 70. In a demonstration that employs a ballistics cart, a ball is projected vertically upward from a cart moving with constant velocity along the horizontal direction. The ball lands in the catching cup of the cart because both the cart and the ball have the same horizontal component of velocity. Now consider a ballistics cart on an incline making an angle with the horizontal, as shown in Figure P11.70. The cart (including its wheels) has a mass M, and the moment of inertia of each of the two wheels is mR 2/2. (a) Using conservation of energy considerations (assuming that there is no friction between the cart and the axles) and assuming pure rolling motion (that is, no slipping), show that the acceleration of the cart along the incline is ax M M 2m g sin Figure P11.67 68. A spool of wire rests on a horizontal surface as in Figure P11.68. As the wire is pulled, the spool does not slip at the contact point P. On separate trials, each one of the forces F1 , F2 , F3 , and F4 is applied to the spool. For each one of these forces, determine the direction in which the spool will roll. Note that the line of action of F2 passes through P. (b) Note that the x component of acceleration of the ball released by the cart is g sin . Thus, the x component of the cart's acceleration is smaller than that of the ball by the factor M/(M 2m). Use this fact and kinematic equations to show that the ball overshoots the cart by an amount x, where x 4m M 2m sin cos2 v yi 2 g F3 F2 and vyi is the initial speed of the ball imparted to it by the spring in the cart. (c) Show that the distance d that the ball travels measured along the incline is d 2vyi 2 g sin cos2 F4 r R c F1 y x P Figure P11.68 Problems 68 and 69. x 69. The spool of wire shown in Figure P11.68 has an inner radius r and an outer radius R. The angle between the applied force and the horizontal can be varied. Show Figure P11.70 360 CHAPTER 11 Rolling Motion and Angular Momentum ANSWERS TO QUICK QUIZZES 11.1 There is very little resistance to motion that can reduce the kinetic energy of the rolling ball. Even though there is friction between the ball and the floor (if there were not, then no rotation would occur, and the ball would slide), there is no relative motion of the two surfaces (by the definition of "rolling"), and so kinetic friction cannot reduce K. (Air drag and friction associated with deformation of the ball eventually stop the ball.) 11.2 The box. Because none of the box's initial potential energy is converted to rotational kinetic energy, at any time t 0 its translational kinetic energy is greater than that of the rolling ball. 11.3 Zero. If she were moving directly toward the pole, r and p would be antiparallel to each other, and the sine of the angle between them is zero; therefore, L 0. 11.4 Both (a) and (b) are false. The net force is not necessarily zero. If the line of action of the net force passes through the point, then the net torque about an axis