ms Huyen psychology - Motivation and emotion Q1 How do...

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Motivation and emotion Q1. How do psychologists define motivation? Motivation is the process by which activities are started, directed , and continued so that physical or psychological needs or wants are met Two types: - Extrinsic motivation: type of motivation in which a person performs an action because it leads to an outcome that is separate from the person. Example: gift for children when they had a good result, tip for server in a restaurant for good service. - Intrinsic motivation: type of motivation in which a person performs an action because the act itself is rewarding or satisfying in some internal manner. Example: a girl want to be a good shape, she will do exercise regularly and have a healthy diet. Q2. What are the three elements of emotion? Physical arousal (Physiological aspect) : When a person experiences an emotion, an arousal is created by the sympathetic nervous system. During the arousal, the body experiences a surge of powerful feelings known as emotions.it is shown through heart rate, blood pressure, skin temperature, e.g. Example: people who can detect changes in their arousal level experience their emotions much more intensely than those who cannot detect the changes in their arousal level. Behavior of emotion (Emotional expressions) : There are facial expressions, body movements and actions that indicate to others how a person feels. Some emotional expressions are influenced by our cultures and society’s rules for displaying emotions. Example: the guards outside of Buckingham Palace are not allowed to display any emotion on their face. Some people have described them as looking mad when in reality they are not. Awareness or cognitive (Subjective experience) : is how we interpret certain situations or stimulations. This determines which emotion our body will feel. It interprets the subjective feeling by giving it a label such as: anger, fear, disgust, happiness, e.g. Example: if you are alone, sitting in the dark, watching a scary movie and suddenly you hear a loud noise, you may become scared… fearing that there is an immediate threat or that you are in danger. This emotional response to this imaginary threat is just as powerful as it would be to a real threat. Our perception to the imaginary threat is what makes it feel real to us and causes the emotion in our body.
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