OrgComm-Ch03ADW - Fundamentals of Organizational...

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Unformatted text preview: Fundamentals of Organizational Communication Theoretical Perspectives for Organizational Communication Chapter 3 Introduction Three Different Approaches to Organizational Communication Functional approach The Meaning Centered Approach The Emerging Perspectives Perspectives Gibson Burrell and Gareth Morgan (1979) The Functional Approach Way of understanding organizational communication by describing what messages do and how they move through organizations. The Functional Approach Number of related units that operate together to create and shape organizational events. Information processing is the primary function of the units. In the Functional approach information processing is seen as the primary function of organizational communication systems. Organizational Communication Systems: Component Parts The Functional Approach Communication inputs information in the external environment that may influence the decision making of the organization. Communication throughput transforming and changing of input information for internal organizational use, and the generation and transmission of internal information throughout the organization. The Functional Approach Communication Output messages to the external environment from within the organization. The Functional Approach Open versus Closed Systems Open Systems organizations that continually take in new information, transform that information, and give information back to the environment. Closed Systems organizations that lack input communication, making it difficult to make good decisions and stay current with the needs of the environment. The Functional Approach Open versus Closed Systems Equifinality Potential for the use of a variety of approaches to reach system goals. Message functions What communication does or how it contributes to the overall functioning of the organization The Functional Approach Organizing functions messages that establish the rules and regulations of a particular environment. The Functional Approach Relationship functions communication that helps individuals define their roles and assess the compatibility of individual and organizational goals. Change functions messages that help organizations adapt what they do and how they do it; viewed as essential to an open system. The Functional Approach Organizing Messages Rules and regulations Organizational policies Task definition Task instruction Task evaluation The Functional Approach Relationship Messages Individual role definition Individual/organizational goals Status symbols Integration among supervisor/subordinates, peers The Functional Approach Change Messages Decision making Market analysis New idea processing Environmental inputs Employee suggestions Problem solving The Functional Approach Message Structure movement of organizing, relationship, and change messages throughout the organization and between the organization and its external environment. The Functional Approach Message Structure Communication Networks the formal and informal patterns of communication that link organizational members together. Formal and informal networks exist side by side; individuals maintain membership in both. The Functional Approach Message Structure Communication Channels means for the transmission of messages. Common means are faceto-face interaction, group meetings, memos, letters, electronic mail systems, computer-assisted data transmission, and teleconferencing. The Functional Approach Message Structure Communication Channels Selecting one channel over another can communicate subtle and important attitudes about both the message receiver and the message itself. Research suggests that our attitude about the message and our willingness to have contact with the receiver significantly influence the channels we use for communication The Functional Approach Message Structure Message Direction description of the movement of messages in organizations based on authority or position levels of message senders and receivers; typically described as downward, upward, and horizontal communication. The Functional Approach Message Structure Communication Load the amount of messages moving through the communication system; commonly referred to as load, overload, and underload. The Functional Approach Message Structure Message Distortion anything that contributes to alterations in meaning as messages move through the organization. The Meaning-Centered Approach way of understanding organizational communication by discovering how organizational reality is generated through human interaction. The approach describes organizational communication as the process for generating shared realities that become organizing, decision making, influence, and culture. The Meaning-Centered Approach Communication as Organizing and Decision Making Organizing bringing order out of chaos, with organizations as the products of the organizing process; described as almost synonymous with the communication process. The Meaning-Centered Approach Communication as Organizing and Decision Making Decision Making process of choosing from among numerous alternatives; the part of the organizing process necessary for directing behaviors and resources toward organizational goals. The Meaning-Centered Approach Communication as Influence organizational and individual attempts to persuade; frequently seen in organizational identification, socialization, communication rules, and power. The Meaning-Centered Approach Communication as Influence Identification perception of a sense of belonging usually associated with the belief that individual and organizational goals are compatible. Socialization active organizational attempts to help members learn appropriate behaviors, norms, and values. The Meaning-Centered Approach Communication as Influence Socialization Anticipatory Socialization- pre-entry information about the organization and anticipated work role. Encounter Socialization - early organizational experiences reducing uncertainty about all aspects of organizational life. Metamorphosis Socialization - initial mastery of basic skills and information and adjustments to organizational life. The Meaning-Centered Approach Communication Rules general prescriptions about appropriate communication behaviors in particular settings. Thematic rules are general prescriptions of behavior reflecting the values and beliefs of the organization, whereas tactical rules prescribe specific behaviors as related to more general themes. The Meaning-Centered Approach Communication Rules Structuration production and reproduction of social systems via the application of generative rules and resources in interaction. Power attempts to influence another person's behavior to produce desired outcomes. The process occurs through communication and is related to resources, dependencies, and alternatives. The Meaning-Centered Approach Communication as Culture Organizing, decision making, and influence processes, when taken together, help us describe the culture of organizations by describing how organizations do things and how they talk about how they do things The Meaning-Centered Approach Communication as Culture Culture unique sense of the place that organizations generate through ways of doing and ways of communicating about the organization; reflects the shared realities and shared practices in the organization and how they create and shape organizational events. The Meaning-Centered Approach Communication as Culture Communication Climate reaction to the organization's culture; consists of collective beliefs, expectations, and values regarding communication that are generated as organizational members continually evaluate their interactions with others. Emerging Perspectives Communication as Constitutive Process communication seen as a process of meaning development and social production of perceptions, identities, social structures, and affective responses. Emerging Perspectives Postmodernism and Organizational Communication theoretical perspectives representing an alienation from the past, skepticism about authority structures, ambiguity of meanings, and mass culture. Emerging Perspectives Postmodernism and Organizational Communication Deconstructionism - refers to the examination of taken-for-granted assumptions, the examination of the myths we utilize to explain how things are the way they are, and the uncovering of the interests involved in socially constructed meanings. Emerging Perspectives Critical Theory and Organizational Communication Critical Theory - focuses attention to studies of power and abuses of power through communication and organization. Hegemony - process of control based on a dominant group leading others to believe their subordination is the norm. Emerging Perspectives Feminist Perspectives and Organizational Communication Feminist Theory - focuses on the marginalization and domination of women in the workplace and the valuing of women's voices in all organizational processes Introduction to Organizational Communication Theoretical Perspectives for Organizational Communication Chapter Three END ...
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This note was uploaded on 09/20/2008 for the course COMM 425 taught by Professor Johnson during the Spring '08 term at Ashford University.

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