AstroISS - Astrodynamics and The International Space...

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Astrodynamics and The International Space Station A Presentation for ASE 2013: Astrodynamics, Propulsion and Structures Dr. Carrie Olsen, former Assistant Professor of Aerospace Engineering, currently serving with NASA Marshall
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Who is Carrie Olsen? § Carrie Olsen, recent former faculty member. § MSU Grad – BS 1985, MS 1986 § Ph.D., 2001, University of Texas at Austin § Employed by NASA-MSFC in Huntsville, AL for most of 20 years § Work experience Orbital Mechanics, mission planning, ascent and re-entry trajectory design and analysis, rendezvous planning and guidance, ISS payload operations § So, why did she come back to MSU? v To bring my experience to the classroom § So, why did she go back to NASA v To be a manager for the Ares projects
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Ares I Integrated Design and Analysis Product Lead Product Leads (or Product Team Leads as they’re sometimes called) lead individual segments of the overall design and integration work package from the Engineering Directorate side. (There is a corresponding leader from the Ares Project Office side. Engineering Directorate is basically the NASA in-house equivalent of a Prime Contractor!) Her team is called Integrated Design and Analysis and is by far the largest team. It is about a 200-person effort that covers GN&C, aerodynamics, loads and structures, thermal, acoustics, etc. Where is Dr. Carrie Olsen Now?
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The Agenda Today n A little more Astrodynamics – what it means and what it encompasses. n Review basic concepts that you’ve already encountered in this class in the context of the International Space Station n Discuss the connection between Astrodynamics and spacecraft systems performance: thermal, electrical, propulsion, etc. using an actual recent event aboard the ISS n Take a video “tour” of the ISS
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Astrodynamics – What is it? n A term coined in the second half of the 20 th century to describe the technical disciplines associated with motion of a spacecraft . n It is an outgrowth of orbital mechanics (or celestial mechanics) and also basic principles of rigid body dynamics . n Astrodynamics is split into 2 major disciplines: ¨ Orbital motion of a spacecraft’s center of mass ¨ Motion of the spacecraft about it’s center of mass n Both are important, and interrelated. Both effect spacecraft design and operation.
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Basics of Orbital Mechanics n Kepler’s Laws (not just for planets anymore!) ¨ The orbit of each planet about the sun is an ellipse with the sun at one focus. (Conic sections are the only possible trajectories for objects in a gravity field) ¨ A line joining a planet to the sun sweeps out equal areas in equal times. (You go faster at perigee than apogee.) ¨ The squares of the periods of the planets are
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AstroISS - Astrodynamics and The International Space...

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