History_of_Astronautics

History_of_Astronautics - History of Astronautics ASE 2013...

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Click to edit Master subtitle style History of Astronautics ASE 2013
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Astronomy The field of Astronautics descended from Astronomy Started with ancient people notice natural divisions of time and movement of the stars Look at contributions of individuals that took Astronautics from observation of constellations to achieving orbit
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Thales (640 – 546 BC) First to teach that the Earth was a sphere Noted the obliquity of the ecliptic None of his writings survive, but we learn of him through others Predicted an eclipse in 585 BC based on Egyptian and Babylonian records
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Pythagoras (569-470 BC) Believed the Earth itself rotates Comets and planets move in a circular path
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Aristarchus (310-250 BC) In his work Magnitudes and Distances, describes his heliocentric theory—6 planets travel in perfect circles around the sun (Greek obsession with circles) His theory was very similar to modern theory.
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Distance to moon/sun
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Size of the Moon
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Size of the Sun
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Aristarchus discredited Theory failed to predict location of Mars (off by 15 degrees) Theory failed because orbits are actually near circular ellipses
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Hipparchus (190-120 BC) Argued against Aristarchus: if planets move around the Sun, then the direction in which we observe a particular star should change Correct observation, but the stars are so far away the angle is immeasurable Argument stood for hundreds of years
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Hipparchus greatest astronomer of antiquity Spherical trigonometry Notion of longitude/latitude Observed precession of rotation Correlated observation of eclipse to refine estimation of distance to moon
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Ptolemy(100-170 BC) Carried forward the work of Hipparchus Geocentric theory used a complicated construction of circles (epicycles) to predict planetary motion
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Ptolemy Accuracy His prediction for the position of Mars was only off by one degree Doubtful he believed his theory but intended only a possible explanation Works examined closely Other influences?
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Hypatia (370-415) Mathematician and philosopher One of the last to work at the library in
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This note was uploaded on 09/21/2008 for the course ASE 2013 taught by Professor Hannigan during the Fall '08 term at Mississippi State.

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History_of_Astronautics - History of Astronautics ASE 2013...

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