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Navigation Greek Myths & Greek Mythology Greek Mythology and the ever popular Greek myths Home mainmenu Home Greek Myths Greek Gods and Heroes About Greek Mythology Return to Content The Myth of Sisyphus in Greek Myths The myth of Sisyphus is one of the most known myths in the Greek Mythology, due to the cunningness of Sisyphus and the punishment that was awaiting him. If you could cheat death, would you? Most people would. But few have ever had the cunning of Sisyphus , the legendary rogue who cheated death not just once, but twice. Sisyphus ultimately paid a heavy price for his trickery: The reprieve he gained through his cunning was brief; the torture he suffered in the Underworld was eternal. Family tree of Sisyphus Father: Aeolus, king of Thessaly, was the father of Sisyphus Mother: Enarete Brother: Salmoneus
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Wife: Merope was the wife of Sisyphus Sons: Glaucus, Thersander, Almus, Ornytion, Sinon Grandson: Bellerophon Sisyphus and Family Issues Sisyphus, the son of Aeolus, was born heir to the throne of Thessaly in central Greece. Sisyphus and one of his brothers, Salmoneus, hated each other and Salmoneus took the throne of Thessaly from him. Eventually Sisyphus would become a king—but never of Thessaly. The sorceress Medea gave Sisyphus the throne of Ephyra, later known as Corinth. Some say that Sisyphus earned the crown by founding the city, which he populated with people grown out of mushrooms. Sisyphus married Merope, the only one of the seven Pleiades (daughters of the Titan Atlas and Pleione) to have wedded a mortal rather than consorting with the gods. The couple would have three children: Glaucus, Ornytion, and Sinon. Glaucus would inherit the throne of Ephyra, but would suffer a gruesome fate. A renowned horseman, Glaucus fed his mares on human flesh. Having whetted their appetites for flesh, Glaucus unwittingly served them up a full meal. After losing a chariot race, his mares tore Glaucus to pieces and ate him on the spot. For generations afterward, horses on Corinth seemed unusually skittish—haunted no doubt by the ghost of Glaucus.
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