Parallelism - Parallelism Shakespeare establishes two separate dysfunctional family dramas from the first sentence of his play both following the

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Parallelism : Shakespeare establishes two separate dysfunctional family dramas  from the first sentence of his play, both following the parallel structure of  corrupted children scheming against their blinded fathers. The first of the two  arises between Gloucester, his true son whom he does not name (Edgar), and  his presumably adopted son, Edmund. The second drama of course is between  King Lear and his three daughters: his favorite Cordelia, and the two scheming  for his kingdom, Goneril and Regan. By pitting blood against blood Shakespeare  not only presents the fact that both sexes are capable of atrocities, but that the  human bond thought to be tougher than any other, a parent to his child, is  expendable; for nothing more than land or money. Foreshadow : King Lear’s rash and foolish banishment of his youngest daughter  Cordelia sets the entire story in motion. Upon hearing Cordelia had been 
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This note was uploaded on 09/21/2008 for the course ENG 1140 taught by Professor Andrews during the Spring '08 term at Nova Southeastern University.

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Parallelism - Parallelism Shakespeare establishes two separate dysfunctional family dramas from the first sentence of his play both following the

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