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9-2 notes - Complete the constellation lab Recap Celestial...

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Complete the constellation lab Recap Celestial sphere Ancient Greek/Roman idea that somehow the earth is a flat surface and over it is a half sphere that the planets and stars and stuff are in Ancient people thought that the movement of the sun, planets, etc. was because the celestial sphere was moving; today we know it’s because the earth itself is moving Celestial poles Axis that the celestial sphere rotates on (out on the celestial sphere) Equator Line that is halfway between the two celestial spheres We all live on the same Earth so we have the same celestial poles and equator New Notes Zenith Perpendicular line from where you are standing on the Earth that extends up until it hits the celestial sphere Nadir Perpendicular line from where you are standing on the Earth that extends down, through the Earth, until it hits the celestial sphere Celestial horizon Circle that encloses the celestial sphere People living on different parts of the Earth have different nadirs, zeniths, and celestial horizons Stars have a seemingly random distribution throughout the celestial sphere Look carefully and you’ll see patterns; today they’re known as constellations Some constellations were discovered in ancient times, others are only a few hundred
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This note was uploaded on 09/21/2008 for the course ASTR 121 taught by Professor Tolbert during the Fall '08 term at UVA.

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9-2 notes - Complete the constellation lab Recap Celestial...

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