9-4 notes - Complete the constellation lab Recap Sun moves relative to background stars If you could see the Sun and the background stars at the

9-4 notes - Complete the constellation lab Recap Sun moves...

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Complete the constellation lab Recap Sun moves relative to background stars If you could see the Sun and the background stars at the same (you really can’t) you’d see the Sun moves relative to the background stars; it makes one loop around the sky in one year The path the Sun travels in one year is called the ecliptic Celestial equator and the ecliptic are tipped 23.5 degrees with respect to each other They cross at two points (called equinoxes) and are furthest apart at two points (called solstices) We mark them as the beginning of seasons Circumpolar stars never appear to set (or in some cases never appear to set) Equatorial stars rise and set You can’t see circumpolar stars on the equator You can’t see equatorial stars on the poles If you live in between the equator and the poles you can see some circumpolar stars and some equatorial stars New Notes Precession The wobble of an object when it’s spinning (like in a gyroscope or a bowl or the Earth)

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