White doctors and nurses on racial inequality in health care in the USA whiteness and colour blind r

White doctors and nurses on racial inequality in health care in the USA whiteness and colour blind r

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Full Terms & Conditions of access and use can be found at Download by: [ECU Libraries] Date: 24 April 2017, At: 09:08 Ethnic and Racial Studies ISSN: 0141-9870 (Print) 1466-4356 (Online) Journal homepage: White doctors and nurses on racial inequality in health care in the USA: whiteness and colour-blind racial ideology Jennifer Malat , Rose Clark-Hitt , Diana Jill Burgess , Greta Friedemann- Sanchez & Michelle Van Ryn To cite this article: Jennifer Malat , Rose Clark-Hitt , Diana Jill Burgess , Greta Friedemann- Sanchez & Michelle Van Ryn (2010) White doctors and nurses on racial inequality in health care in the USA: whiteness and colour-blind racial ideology, Ethnic and Racial Studies, 33:8, 1431-1450 To link to this article: Published online: 12 Jan 2010. Submit your article to this journal Article views: 829 View related articles Citing articles: 7 View citing articles
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White doctors and nurses on racial inequality in health care in the USA: whiteness and colour-blind racial ideology Jennifer Malat, Rose Clark-Hitt, Diana Jill Burgess, Greta Friedemann-Sanchez and Michelle Van Ryn ( First submission February 2008; First published January 2010 ) Abstract In this paper we report on an interdisciplinary project interviewing doctors and nurses about racial inequality in health care in the USA. We analysed data from interviews with twenty-two white doctors and nurses in which they were asked to offer explanations for racial inequality in health care. Results provide insight into how whiteness operates to provide white patients more often with appropriate health care and how colour-blind ideology can be adapted to accommodate naming white advantage and potential racial discrimination. However, even when naming mechanisms of white advantage in accessing resources, the white respondents avoided acknowledging how they are implicated in racial inequality in health care. We discuss the implications for understanding whiteness and colour-blind ideology. Keywords: Colour-blind; whiteness; white racial ideology; racial inequality; racial discourse; qualitative. While many studies document racial inequality in medical treatment across a variety of health problems in the USA (Smedley, Stith and Nelson 2003), research continues working to uncover and examine the sources of the inequality. Data from an interdisciplinary project of interviewing doctors and nurses about racial inequality in medical treatment revealed descriptions by whites of how whiteness operates to gain advantage for whites in health care. Results also provide insight into how colour-blind ideology can be adapted to accommodate whites naming white advantage and potential racial discrimination, while Ethnic and Racial Studies Vol. 33 No. 8 September 2010 pp. 1431 ± 1450 # 2010 Taylor & Francis ISSN 0141-9870 print/1466-4356 online DOI: 10.1080/01419870903501970
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overlooking the potential culpability of the white speaker. In this paper, we describe these results and discuss the implications for understanding colour-blind ideology and white privilege.
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