Supreme Ct. 10-25

Supreme Ct. 10-25 - 1. What are the mechanisms of lobbying...

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What are the mechanisms of lobbying in the court? a. Influencing judicial appointments i. Groups provide testimony at hearings 1. Support has little effect 2. Criticism undercuts confirmation vote b. Mobilize public opinion i. Groups try to affect who is nominated 1. Indirect Influence ii. Try to use public opinion to affect the court 1. Direct Influence 2. What impact do interest groups have? a. Sponsorship of litigation i. Historically believed to be important 1. But, usually attributed to select cases a. For example, Brown v. Board of Education (1954) 2. Analytical problems: a. Is Brown representative? b. Would the outcome have been the same without sponsorship? ii. Systematic research shows that sponsorship matters 1. Both liberal and conservative interests more likely to win if sponsored b. Amicus curiae briefs i. Do they affect wins? 1. Assumption is that Court cares about policy consequences of decisions a. Motivated to make decisions that work well in society 2. How to measure sensitivity to societal consequences? a.
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This note was uploaded on 09/22/2008 for the course POLO 202 taught by Professor Mcguire during the Spring '08 term at UNC.

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Supreme Ct. 10-25 - 1. What are the mechanisms of lobbying...

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