Jane Eyre ISP - Feminist vs Marxist Four main areas of...

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Feminist vs Marxist Four main areas of study: • economic power • materialism versus spirituality • class conflict • art, literature, and ideologies • Chapter 14: pp. 132 – 140: “Is Miss Eyre there?” to “...were it once free, it would soar cloud-high.” • Chapter 17: pp. 173 – 174: “Why, I suppose you have a governess for her,” to “My lily-flower, you are right now, as always.” • Chapter 17: pp. 176 – 177: “‘How do you do?’ he asked,” to the end of the chapter. • Chapter 23: pp. 244 – 245: “Jane, be still; don’t struggle so...” to “Jane, will you marry me?” • Chapter 24: p. 259: “I remembered what in the hurry of events...I had wholly forgotten” to “...I could better endure to be kept by him now.” “Marxist criticism pays a lot of attention to the social structures that allocate power to different groups in society.” Marxist critics usually examine conflict between characters due to differences in social classes. Critics attempt to identify conflicts of power, class and wealth in works. This critical viewpoint allows them to examine characters based on their socioeconomic status and their desire for economic improvement and how this influences the piece as a whole. They also look into how class differences are represented and reinforced to audiences through literature. Instead of searching for authors' meanings, Marxist critics also read texts based on historic influences in an attempt to point out social inequalities to the reader. One of the main goals of a Marxist critic is to identify how a writer's struggle with class and financial position influences their writing. Jane Eyre: Marxist point of view - Strangers despite being placed into a “family” situation - Discrimination towards the poor - Classicism: treating the orphan girl as if she is an animal - Treating her as is she was a slave or servant, rather than family When Jane left Rochester because he was already married, it shows that she feels as if she was his equal, that she has her own morals and values which money and status cannot break. Personal dignity They married with dignity and love combined, rather than conflicted In her novel Jane Eyre , Charlotte Brontë explores the possibility that class relationships have no absolute boundaries that cannot be crossed. Her protagonist Jane is placed in between economic classes and drifts among the lower, middle, and upper classes of Victorian England. Jane's flexible class status allows her to evaluate other characters on their actions and personalities rather than on their economic status and physical appearance. She forms deep relationships with members of the other classes and holds animosity towards individuals that others might respect based on their achievements in life but who did not act
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appropriately to Jane. Other characters in the novel judge Jane in much the same way as she judges them; they note her class status and physical appearance at first but then learn to appreciate her for her behavior and thoughts. Brontë ends the novel on a dramatic turn of events that
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