{[ promptMessage ]}

Bookmark it

{[ promptMessage ]}

LS1a Fall 2008 9-16 lecture notes

LS1a Fall 2008 9-16 lecture notes - The ask vs the cell The...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–6. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
page 1 The flask vs the cell What does it mean to be alive? The flask The cell
Image of page 1

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
page 2 Life Sciences 1a An Integrated Introduction to the Life Sciences Lecture Slides Set 1 Fall 2008 Prof. Daniel Kahne
Image of page 2
page 3 Lectures 1 & 2 : The Chemical Foundations of Life I 1. Component parts of the cell a. Organization of the cell b. Macromolecules in the cell c. Small molecules and metabolites d. Water: THE molecule of life 2. Understanding the molecules of life: chemical structures and bonding a. The periodic table and electronegativity b. Ionic bonding c. Covalent bonding and the “octet” rule d. Geometries of organic molecules e. Covalent bond energy 3. Understanding intermolecular forces a. Ionic interactions b. Hydrogen bonding c. Partial-partial charge interactions d. Van der Waals forces e. The continuum of intermolecular forces f. Understanding phase changes in water
Image of page 3

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
page 4 The flask vs the cell What does it mean to be alive? The flask The cell This course is intended to provide an integrated introduction to the life sciences. In the first part of the class, we are going to try to provide a foundation for understanding the thermodynamics and kinetics of living systems. In order to do that, we need to start by learning about the smallest units of matter that matter in living systems: electrons and their arrangements in atoms and molecules. The emphasis will be on understanding aspects of chemistry that will enable you to think about what happens in biological systems. I want you to keep in mind a question throughout this course: What does it mean to be “living”? It has been known for well over a hundred years that all living systems are made up of a fundamental unit called the cell. The cell is a finite entity with a definite boundary, the plasma membrane. That means that the essence of the living state must be contained within that structure. We can t understand what happens in living cells without understanding what the component parts of a cell are and how they interact, so we will spend time learning about those component parts. After a description of the component parts, we will move on to examine how scientists try to understand the complexity of the cell because a cell is much more than the sum of its component parts. After all, we can t simply reconstitute a cell by mixing its component parts together in a flask. There is a level of organization and regulation in the way the component parts of a cell function together that leads to what we call “life”. How much do we really understand about “life” in the scientific sense? How much further do we have to go and how can we get there? At the end of the course, we hope that you have a foundation for thinking about what happens in biological systems -- both from the chemical and the biological perspectives -- and that you have a better appreciation of the complexity of cells.
Image of page 4
page 5 Cell structure The human body The cell I think it is fair to say that most people are far more interested in understanding human life than in understanding any other form of life.
Image of page 5

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 6
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern