Chapter 5 - Chemistry in Focus 3rd edition Tro Chapter 5...

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Chemistry in Focus 3rd edition Tro Chapter 5 Chemical Bonding
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Poison or Seasoning? How can two poisons (elemental sodium and elemental chlorine) combine to form a flavor enhancer (sodium chloride) that tastes great on steak? Answer: By an exchange of electrons that stabilizes both atoms–the formation of a chemical bond
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G. N. Lewis
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G. N. Lewis and Bonding Fundamental ideas: Valence electrons are the most important. Two types Ionic – Covalent – Bond formation results in formation of full Bohr orbits. Because this stable configuration typically involves electrons, this is commonly known as the rule.
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Lewis Structure Element symbol surrounded by a number of dots equal to the number of valence electrons. Ignore the inner or CORE electrons. The order in which electrons (dots) are drawn and their exact locations are not critical.
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A simple, powerful theory. According to Lewis theory, chemical bonding brings together elements in the correct ratios so that all of the atoms involved form an octet.
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Ionic Lewis Structures Since ionic bonding involves the transfer of electrons from a metal to a nonmetal, the Lewis structure for an ionic compound involves moving dots. The metal becomes a cation and the nonmetal becomes an anion.
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Charges The metal and the nonmetal each acquire a charge in the formation of an ionic bond. We indicate the magnitude of the charge in the
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This note was uploaded on 09/23/2008 for the course CHEM 1015 taught by Professor Jeeddleton during the Fall '07 term at Virginia Tech.

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Chapter 5 - Chemistry in Focus 3rd edition Tro Chapter 5...

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