Gov310%20Slides%20Part%20I

Gov310%20Slides%20Part%20I - Introduction to Introduction...

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Unformatted text preview: Introduction to Introduction to American Government American Government Gov 310L: Unique # Gov 310L: Unique # 39300 39300 Professor David L. Leal Professor David L. Leal Fall, 2008 Fall, 2008 Class hours: MWF 2:00-2:50 My office hours: MWF 1pm to 2pm My office: Batts 3.140 Email: dleal@austin.utexas.edu Phone: 471-1343 Administrative Details Administrative Details Christian Sorace Office Hours: MW 12:30pm to 2pm Office: Batts 1.118 Email: christiansorace@gmail.com Teaching Assistants Teaching Assistants Eric Svensen Office Hours: F 9:30am to 12:30pm Office: Batts 1.118 Email: ericsvensen@mail.utexas.edu Teaching Assistants Teaching Assistants Why care about government? Why care about government? Max Weber: government has a monopoly on the legitimate use of physical force Lord Acton: Power tends to corrupt, and absolute power corrupts absolutely James Madison: If men were angels, no government would be necessary. Thomas Hobbes: life without government would be a war of all against all and would be nasty, brutish, and short. Democracy in America: The Big Picture Democracy in America: The Big Picture Democracy vs. dictatorship, aristocracy, and oligarchy Direct vs. representative democracy Popular vs. responsible models of democracy Key Theme in Key Theme in The New American Democracy The New American Democracy The Importance of Elections The Importance of Elections Frequency of elections in America Large number of elected officials Primary and general elections Ballot propositions (initiative and referendum) and recall Key concept in Key concept in The New American Democracy The New American Democracy The Permanent Campaign The Permanent Campaign 1. Separation of elections 2. Technological progress 3. Proliferation of interest groups 4. Proliferation of polls 5. Escalating cost of campaigns Some challenges to Some challenges to our democracy our democracy Low voter participation Primary elections Campaign resources Uninformed citizens Chapter 2: Historical Timeline Chapter 2: Historical Timeline Stamp Act and Tea Tax (1765, 1773) 1st & 2nd Continental Congress (1774, 1775) Declaration of Independence (1776) Inalienable rights (including life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness) Consent of the governed (social contract theory) Right to change government American Revolution (1776-1783) Articles of Confederation (1781) A failed experiment Followed by Shays rebellion (1786) Annapolis Convention (1786) Constitutional Convention (1787) Thomas Hobbes rejection of divine right of kings right of people to choose their government John Locke: separation of powers Montesquieu: an independent judiciary Philosophical Foundations Philosophical Foundations of the Constitution of the Constitution Chapter 2: Conceptual Timeline...
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Gov310%20Slides%20Part%20I - Introduction to Introduction...

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