Ch 6 BB

Ch 6 BB - Perception Chapter 6 1 Perception Selective...

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1 Perception Chapter 6
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2 Perception Selective Attention Perceptual Illusions Perceptual Organization Form Perception Motion Perception Perceptual Constancy
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3 Perception Perceptual Interpretation Sensory Deprivation and Restored  Vision Perceptual Adaptation Perceptual Set Perception and Human Factor
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4 Perception The process of selecting, organizing, and interpreting  sensory information, which enables us to recognize  meaningful objects and events.
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5 Selective Attention Perceptions about objects change from moment to  moment. We can perceive different forms of the Necker  cube; however, we can only pay attention to one aspect  of the object at a time.  Necker Cube
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6 Perceptual Illusions Illusions provide good examples in understanding  how perception is organized. Studying faulty  perception is as important as studying other  perceptual phenomena. Line AB is longer than line BC.
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7 3-D Illusion It takes a great deal of effort to perceive this figure in two  dimensions. Reprinted with kind permission of Elsevier Science-NL. Adapted from Hoffman, D. & Richards, W. Parts of recognition. Cognition, 63, 29-78
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8 Perceptual Organization When vision competes with our other senses, vision  usually wins – a phenomena called  visual capture . How do we form meaningful perceptions from sensory  information? We organize it. Gestalt psychologists showed that a  figure formed a “whole” different than its surroundings.
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9 Organization of the visual field into objects (figures)  that stand out from their surroundings (ground). Form Perception Time Savings Suggestion, © 2003 Roger Sheperd.
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10 Grouping After distinguishing the figure from the ground, our  perception needs to organize the figure into a  meaningful form using grouping rules.
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11 Depth Perception Visual Cliff Depth perception enables us to judge distances. Gibson  and Walk  (1960) suggested that human infants 
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This note was uploaded on 09/24/2008 for the course PGS 101 taught by Professor Blan during the Summer '08 term at ASU.

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Ch 6 BB - Perception Chapter 6 1 Perception Selective...

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