Ch 13 BBr

Ch 13 BBr - Emotion Chapter 13 1 Theories of Emotion...

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1 Emotion Chapter 13
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2 Theories of Emotion Emotions are a mix of 1) physiological activation, 2)  expressive behaviors, and 3) conscious experience.
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3 Controversy 1) Does physiological arousal precede or follow  your emotional experience? 1) Does cognition (thinking) precede emotion  (feeling)?
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4 James-Lange Theory William James and Carl  Lange proposed an idea that  was diametrically opposed to  the “common-sense” view.   The James-Lange Theory  proposes that physiological  activity precedes the  emotional experience.
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5 Cannon-Bard Theory Walter Cannon and  Phillip Bard questioned  the James-Lange Theory  and proposed that an  emotion-triggering  stimulus and the body's  arousal take place  simultaneously.
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6 Two-Factor Theory Stanley Schachter and  Jerome Singer proposed yet  another theory which  suggests our physiology and  cognitions create emotions.  Emotions have two factors– physical arousal and  cognitive label.
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7 Embodied Emotion We know that emotions involve bodily responses.  Some of these responses are very noticeable (butterflies  in our stomach when fear arises), but others are more  difficult to discern (neurons activated in the brain).
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8 Comparison To assess these theories, we’ll consider three  questions: – Does physiological arousal always precede  emotional experience? – Are different emotions marked by distinct  physiological responses? – What is the connection between what we think  and feel?
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9 Emotions and Autonomic Nervous  System During any emotional experience, our autonomic  nervous system mobilizes for action.
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10 Arousal and Performance Prolonged physical arousal taxes the body, but arousal in  short spurts is adaptive.  We perform well under moderate arousal, but optimal  performance varies with task difficulty. 
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11 Physiological Similarities Physiological responses such as heart rate, perspiration,  and respiratory rate are similar for the emotions of fear,  anger, love, and boredom. Excitement and fear involve a similar physiological arousal.
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12 Physiological Differences Other physical responses, like finger temperature and  movement of facial muscles, may change during fear,  rage, and joy. The amygdala shows differences in activation during the 
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This note was uploaded on 09/24/2008 for the course PGS 101 taught by Professor Blan during the Summer '08 term at ASU.

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Ch 13 BBr - Emotion Chapter 13 1 Theories of Emotion...

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