review%201%20finalize - 10/3/2007 4:22:00 PM 1) Theory of...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
03/10/2007 17:22:00 1) Theory of Myth How is myth defined? The word myth comes from the Greek word “mythos” which could mean story, word,  speech, or tale. Essentially, myth is a  story  that maybe narrated orally but usually it is  eventually given a written form. A myth could also be told through painting, sculpture, music,  dance, mime, opera, song etc. It is a comprehensive (but not exclusive) term for  stories  primarily concerned with the gods and humankind’s relations with them .   Myths may have  some historical reality; they are not always entirely false. Myth (proper): Gods and their interactions with humans. Folktales: tales of  adventure , sometimes peopled with fantastic beings and  enlivened by ingenious strategies on the part of the  hero . Functions primarily to  entertain . Saga: Has a perceptible  relationship to history ; however fanciful and imaginative, it  has its roots in historical fact.  More stories about men. Myth interpreted by etiology Myth is used as an  explanation of the origin of some fact or custom . Myths usually  try to explain emotional, spiritual, and physical matters not only literally and realistically, but also  figuratively and metaphorically as well. Myths attempt to explain the origin of our world, the  source of beauty and goodness and of evil and sin, the nature and meaning of love, etc. The  problem with an etiological approach to myth is that it does nothing to identify a myth specifically  and distinguish it clearly from any other form of expression, whether scientific, religious, or  artistic-that is, too many essentially different kinds of story may be basically etiological. Myth interpreted by allegory and symbolism Myth can be seen as allegory (a sustained metaphor) where the details of the story are  but  symbols of universal truth . Some myths are nature myths and certain gods represent or  control the sky (Zeus), but many myths have no relationship to nature.
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Myth interpreted by psychology (Freud and Jung)
Background image of page 2
Freud’s contributions to psychology/mythology: theory of unconscious, interpretation of  dreams, and identification of the Oedipus complex. Freud drew a connection between psychoanalysis and mythology. He explores the  unconscious mind,  dreams  (represents fulfillment of wishes that have been repressed), and  myths  (waking dreams, collective unconscious of humanity). The 
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 25

review%201%20finalize - 10/3/2007 4:22:00 PM 1) Theory of...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online