FieldStudy - 1 Running head POLITICAL PARTICIPATION THROUGH...

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Running head: POLITICAL PARTICIPATION THROUGH SOCIAL MEDIA Political Participation Through Social Media Kelly M. Donaldson University of Pittsburgh at Johnstown Author Note Kelly M. Donaldson, Department of Psychology, University of Pittsburgh at Johnstown. Correspondence regarding this article should be addressed to Kelly M. Donaldson, Department of Psychology, University of Pittsburgh at Johnstown, 450 Schoolhouse Road, Johnstown, PA, 15904 Contact: [email protected] 1
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POLITICAL PARTICIPATION THROUGH SOCIAL MEDIA Abstract In this study, gender and number of followers were examined to determine a correlation between the role of social media and political participation. Students from the University of Pittsburgh at Johnstown investigated the feeds of men and women for any political involvement through their social media accounts. We hypothesized the dominant gender would be men, most participants would have a post-college education, and the more followers the more likely one would post. The finding suggested there were more men participants, college levels participants, and the majority of participants had almost an equal amount of followers to one another. 2
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POLITICAL PARTICIPATION THROUGH SOCIAL MEDIA Political Participation Through Social Media Throughout the years of advancing technology, social media has become a significant communication platform to increase political involvement. There has been a major decrease in political interests but according to Storsul (2014), “There has been growing optimism that social media can stimulate political participation and deliberation, especially among young people (p. 17). Social medias such as Facebook and twitter is one of the top two outlets for communication around the world. This demographic tend is toward the younger population. It is more likely for one to voice their views through social media rather than another form. We hypothesized the
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