cancergenetics - European Journal of Human Genetics(2005 13...

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European Journal of Human Genetics (2005) 13, 1099–1100. doi:10.1038/sj.ejhg.5201477; published online 3 August 2005 Cancer genetics: Finding the right mix Jesse S Boehm 1 , 2 , 3 , 4 and William C Hahn 1 , 2 , 3 , 4 1. 1 Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, 44 Binney St., Dana 710C, Boston, MA 02115-6013, USA 2. 2 Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA 02115, USA 3. 3 Department of Medicine and Pathology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA 4. 4 Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA Correspondence: William C Hahn, E-mail: [email protected] In this month's Nature Genetics , Stanford scientists report on the development of new experimental models of melanoma that may facilitate the identification of cooperating transforming mutations. Cancer is the end product of the accumulation of multiple genetic lesions. Most epithelial human cancers harbor complex karyotypes that reflect cycles of genomic instability. Although much progress has been made in identifying and characterizing cancer- associated mutations, the complexity of the cancer genome often makes it difficult to connect a cancer genotype to specific malignant phenotypes. Over the past few years, several groups have created cell and animal models of cancer with the goal of deciphering the roles of specific pathways implicated in oncogenesis. Human cell models have proven quite useful in this regard. 1 However, these experimental systems have typically assayed tumorigenicity via subcutaneous implants in immunodeficient mice. Reliance upon these protocols raises the concern that such systems fail to incorporate critical features of cancer such as the input of tissue-specific stromal cells. Moreover, since such cell-based models require some period of culturing ex vivo , an additional concern is that the process of culturing imposes artificial requirements for transformation.
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  • Proc Natl Acad, Natl Acad Sci, Acad Sci USA, human malignant melanoma

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