Basic Chem

Basic Chem - BILD 1 Lecture 2 April 3, 2008 Simple...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–19. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
BILD 1 Lecture 2 April 3, 2008 Simple Chemistry Chemistry of Carbon
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Today’s Lecture Cell Theory Chemical bonds Chemical reactions Water as solvent Acids, bases, and buffers Isomers Functional Groups
Background image of page 2
The Cell Theory 1. All life forms are made from one or more cells. 1. Cells only arise from pre-existing cells. 3. The cell is the smallest form of life.
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
History of the Cell Theory Hans and Zacharias Janssen, and Galileo Galilei (1600s) Produced first compound microscope (2 lenses). Robert Hooke (1665) Coined the term "cell" after viewing a piece of cork through a compound microscope (“small container”).
Background image of page 4
History of the Cell Theory: Continued. Anton van Leeuwenhoek (1670s and 1680s) Observed bacteria and protozoa in blood, rainwater, and scrapings from teeth through a simple microscope. Matthias Schleiden and Theodor Schwann (1838-1839) Discovered that plant and animal parts are made of cells "all living things are composed of living cells" Schleiden
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
1. All life forms are made from one or more cells Fission yeast cells stained with DAPI (DNA looks blue)
Background image of page 6
2. Cells only arise from pre-existing cells Louis Pasteur Experiment (1860s): kentsimmons.uwinnipeg.ca/
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
3. The cell is the smallest form of life Bacteria Protists Plants Archea Fungi Animals
Background image of page 8
Cell Theory http://www.teachertube.com/view_video.php?viewkey=2d7d9e2c25b71476ec25
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Chemical bonds Review your atomic hierarchy= neutrons, protons, electrons, atoms, elements, compounds. Chemical bonds: interactions between atoms. Four important chemical bonds in biology, in order of their relative strength: Covalent bonds (strongest) Ionic bonds Hydrogen bonds Van der Waals interactions (weakest)
Background image of page 10
Covalent bonds = Sharing of electrons by two atoms Can be polar or non-polar.
Background image of page 11

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Ionic bonds = the more electronegative atom strips an electron completely away from another atom. Classic example: NaCl (table salt)
Background image of page 12
Hydrogen bonds = atomic interaction between a partially positive hydrogen atom and a partially negative atom. Example: Water-water interaction Hydrogen bonds
Background image of page 13

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Van der Waals interactions = very weak interaction between two atoms due to asymmetrically distributed electrons. Many of these weak interactions result in a major overall atomic interaction.
Background image of page 14
van der Waals in Gecko Keller, et al. (UC Berkeley), “Evidence for van del Walls adhesion in gecko setae,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, August 27, 2002.
Background image of page 15

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Review: Four important chemical bonds in biology: Covalent bonds Ionic bonds Hydrogen bonds Van der Waals interactions
Background image of page 16
Chemical Reactions = Making and breaking chemical bonds New chemicals are produced (products) Must be balanced (conservation of mass)
Background image of page 17

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Problem 9, page 46 What coefficients must be placed in the blanks so that all atoms are accounted for in the products?
Background image of page 18
Image of page 19
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 09/27/2008 for the course BILD 1 taught by Professor Boulanger during the Spring '08 term at UCSD.

Page1 / 51

Basic Chem - BILD 1 Lecture 2 April 3, 2008 Simple...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 19. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online