Class13 - The Enemy Outside External Changes in Leaders and...

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The Enemy Outside External Changes in Leaders and Regimes through War Why a Second Gulf War? After the victory of the US-led coalition over Iraq in 1991, Saddam Hussein was able to hold onto power despite defeat and crippling sanctions. In 2003, the US and Great Britain invaded Iraq and overthrew him. What was the underlying strategic problem that the first Gulf War did not solve? Regimes and War Aims The sizes of the winning coalition and selectorate of a state shape the level of public goods and private benefits that its leader produces. How do they affect war aims? Public goods: security of members of society, ideological goals Private benefits: loot, material benefits for supporters Territory as a War Aim Countries have long fought over territory. How can territorial gain increase public goods or private benefits? The material value of territory increases state resources and so the amount of private benefits the leader can provide. If the territory has strategic value, it could increase the public good of personal security. Taking territory to shift the balance of power between two rivals
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This note was uploaded on 09/27/2008 for the course POLISCI 160 taught by Professor Morrow during the Fall '08 term at University of Michigan.

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Class13 - The Enemy Outside External Changes in Leaders and...

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