P041_L08-Fa08(Newton-III)p

P041_L08-Fa08(Newton-III)p - Monday, 15 September 2008...

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Monday, 15 September 2008 Newton’s Laws- III 08-01. If the net force on an object is zero, what is the acceleration of the object? 1. positive 2. negative 3. depends on how many forces are applied 4. zero 5. I have absolutely no idea
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Introductory Physics - I: Introductory Physics - I: Lecture 08 Lecture 08 Monday, 15 September 2008
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Attention! (1) CPS03 closes at 6 AM on Wednesday, 17 Sep. (2) CPS04 opened at 6 AM today; closes on 24 Sep. (3) CPS04 is the last CPS before MT1PM on 25 Sep from 6:00 9:00 PM or MT1AM on 26 Sep from 5:45 8:45 AM.
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Attention – MT Equation Sheets! Two equation sheets will be permitted for each of the three monthly tests. Copies of these have been posted to Bb in the Course Documents Section.
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Newton’s Laws Newton’s Laws of Motion of Motion New Topic
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Ancient: Force is required to keep something moving Objects tend to stop if they are in motion Historical Interlude Historical Interlude Isaac Newton (1643–1727) published Principia Mathematica in 1687. In this work, he proposed three “laws” of motion: Law 1: An object subject to no net external forces is at rest or moves with a constant velocity. Law 2: Σ F F = m a a Law 3: Forces occur in pairs: F F A on B = F F B on A (“For every action there is an equal and opposite reaction”) opposite direction Modern: Force is required to change motion Objects tend to remain in their initial state
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ConcepTest 08-02 ConcepTest 08-02 1) 16 s 2) 8 s 3) 4 s 4) 2 s 5) 1 s From rest, we step on the gas of our Ferrari, providing a force F for 4 secs , speeding it up to a final speed v . If the applied force were only 1 / 2 F , how long would it have to be applied to reach the same final speed? v F
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ConcepTest 08-02 ConcepTest 08-02 1) 16 s 2) 8 s 3) 4 s 4) 2 s 5) 1 s From rest, we step on the gas of our Ferrari, providing a force F for 4 secs , speeding it up to a final speed v . If the applied force were only 1 / 2 F , how long would it have to be applied to reach the same final speed? v F If F is reduced to F /2, then a is reduced to a /2 and v = a t and therefore we must double t to get the same final v .
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ConcepTest 08-03 ConcepTest 08-03 1) 250 m 2) 200 m 3) 150 m 4) 100 m 5) 50 m From rest, we step on the gas of our Ferrari, providing a force F for 4 secs . During this time, the car moves 50 m. If the same force would be applied for 8 secs , how much would the car have traveled during this time? v F
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ConcepTest 08-03 ConcepTest 08-03 1) 250 m 2) 200 m 3) 150 m 4) 100 m 5) 50 m From rest, we step on the gas of our Ferrari, providing a force F for 4 secs . During this time, the car moves 50 m. If the same force would be applied for 8 secs , how much would the car have traveled during this time? v F If t is doubled, x quadruples because: x = ½ a t 2
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ConcepTest 08-04 ConcepTest 08-04 We step on the brakes of our Ferrari, providing a force F for 4 secs . During this time, the car moves 25 m, but does not stop.
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P041_L08-Fa08(Newton-III)p - Monday, 15 September 2008...

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