History Paper 1.1 - Singhal 1 Akash Singhal Discussion 1N...

This preview shows page 1 - 3 out of 7 pages.

Singhal1Akash Singhal Discussion 1N Simone Salmon 29 January 2017 Anti-Semitism in Inter-war Nazi Germany The program published by the Nazi Party in its very first year, 1920, disregarded Jews as German nationals, sought to expel excessive non-citizens from Germany, and admonished the “Jewish-materialistic spirit.” Hitler in his speeches on June 24, 1920 and August 13, 1920 claimed that the Jews would have to leave Germany. The Nazi party pursued the concept of racial superiority and the idea that race was something that could be measured and was indicated in one’s actions. Hence, the Semites were seen as a separate race from the Aryan Germans and were associated with undesirable characteristics that were passed down generations. Hitler sought to purify the German race by removing the Jews and all other asocial elements in order to create a healthy body politic. Anti-Semitism and racial purification came to form the bedrock of the Nazi policy; the economic conditions of Germany, the loss in World War I and the negligible public resistance to Nazi actions were all pivotal factors in the Nazi attack on the Jews. The Nazis blamed the Jews for Germany’s loss in World War I as the Nazis claimed that the Jews had betrayed Germany and caused German humiliation, loss of territory, and economic troubles. The Nazis developed a “stab in the back” theory, which was the notion that Germany had lost the First World War not because of its own deficiencies, but because of an internal betrayal. This internal betrayal was then attributed to the Jews, who were regarded as inherently disloyal. According to Norman Naimark, the Nazis believed that the Jewish race “had done everything it could at home, in Europe, and in the world to thwart the attainment of German
Singhal2goals” (59). The political instability surrounding the creation of the Weimar Republic, which the Nazis claimed was detrimental to German interests, too was pinpointed to the Jews. However, the evidence of Jewish veterans from the First World War contradicts the Nazi theories. The evidence of Jewish veterans can be seen from Marion A. Kaplan’s article, ‘Jewish Women in Nazi Germany: Daily Life, Daily Struggles, 1933-1939,’ in which, she discusses the reprieves form the “April Laws” that President Hindenburg had provided to “those Jewish civil servants, lawyers, physicians, or teachers who had fought in World War I; whose fathers or sons had served” (594). This demonstrates the invalidity of the generalization that was made against the Jews. Jews had been acculturated and assimilated into the German society and bore allegiance to Germany, however, the unrest in Germany following the loss in the First World War required a scapegoat and Jews were the unfortunate victims. The Nazis used this anti-Semitic propaganda before the year 1933 to appeal to the people and come to power democratically.

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture