82008-charge

82008-charge - Properties of Electric Charge Exists in two...

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PY 208N-008 Dr. Dougherty http://courses.ncsu.edu/py208n/lec/009/ Make sure you are in one of the required lab sections:  PY208L-229 to PY208L-244
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Objectives for the Day: 08/20/08 1)  Describe the course and how it will be run. 2)  Explain why we need the concept of electric charge. 3)  Outline the properties of electric charges.
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Electric Charge Matter is made of atoms. Atoms are made of electrons, protons, and neutrons: Particle Mass Charge Electron 9.11 x 10-31 kg -1.6 x 10-19 C Proton 1.67 x 10-27 kg +1.6 x 10-19 C Neutron 1.67 x 10-27 kg 0.0 C Charge is a fundamental property of subatomic particles, similar conceptually to mass. Electron cloud Protons, neutrons in a dense nucleus
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How do we know about Electric Charge? We observe forces that are not due to direct contact and not gravitational that are best  explained by the hypothesis that matter is made of charged particles.
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Unformatted text preview: Properties of Electric Charge Exists in two varieties: positive and negative Quantized in units of 1.6 x 10-19 Coulombs (simply due to the subatomic structure of atter). Conserved in a closed system (no particles in or out) Like charges repel, unlike charges attract. Electrostatic force demo Charges in Bulk Matter Conductors: some electrons move freely in a background of fixed nuclei. Insulators: electrons and nuclei are more or less fixed in place. Examples: Metals like Copper Examples: Glass, plastic, etc. Charging by Induction Neutral conductor Polarized by an insulator Connected to ground Disconnected from ground Charged conductor (or, Experimental evidence that electrons can move in conductors)...
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This note was uploaded on 09/28/2008 for the course PY 208N taught by Professor Dougherty during the Spring '08 term at N.C. State.

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82008-charge - Properties of Electric Charge Exists in two...

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