23_marine_chemistry_2 - Marine Chemistry II Outline Friday...

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1 Marine Chemistry II Outline Friday Physical Properties of Water Salinity Other constituents in seawater Monday (Today) Geochemical Cycles 1. Residence time 2. Spatial patterns of conservative constituents 3. Spatial patterns of non-conservative constituents Marine Chemistry
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2 Processes Controlling Seawater Composition 1. Chemical compounds in seawater are dynamic , not static. 2. There is a continuous input and a continuous loss of seawater components. seawater losses inputs cyclic processes seawater losses inputs cyclic processes The “Steady-State Approximation” When the rate of input equals the rate of loss, the composition of seawater remains constant with time There is good evidence that over the last 100 M years, the composition of seawater has remained ~ constant Residence Time A signifcant amount oF insight can be gained about a given chemical constituent in seawater by determining the average length oF time it spends in the ocean beFore being removed or transFormed
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Computing Residence Time Residence Time = Reservoir Size/Input Rate Example: Chloride Ion Residence Time (in years) = Note: canceling units of “ kilograms of chloride ion”, gives units of years. (total kilograms of chloride ions in the entire ocean) (total kilograms of chloride ions input from all rivers)/year f k f h d ( t o t a l k i l o g r a m s o f c h l o r i d e i o n s i n t h e e n t i r e o c e a n ) ( t o t a l k i l o g r a m s o f c h l o r i d e i o n s i n p u t f r o m a l l r i v e r s ) / y e a r Example of Using Residence Time Calculation The Water Cycle seawater river ice Inputs Outputs evaporation evaporation freezing freezing precipitation precipitation melting melting river input river input 1. Assume input and output are in balance (steady state) 2. Recognize that evaporation is by far the
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23_marine_chemistry_2 - Marine Chemistry II Outline Friday...

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