Pew_Report_Summary

Pew_Report_Summary - Americas Living Oceans CHARTING A...

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COMMISSION Summary Report Recommendations for a New Ocean Policy May 2003 A merica s Living Oceans CHARTING A COURSE FOR SEA CHANGE
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F RONT AND BACK COVER Light of the setting sun bathes battered sea stacks shrouded by summer fog at McClure’s Beach, in Point Reyes National Seashore, California. Here, pounding Pacific waves have carved a shoreline of white cres- cent beaches and rocky cliffs. D AVID SANGER/DAVIDSANGER.COM O PPOSITE Tourists kayak the turquoise waters of Virgin Islands National Park. Americans love their freedom to move about the ocean surface where no streets, signs, or fences impede them, yet their sense that no one owns this vast realm has allowed them to tolerate no one caring for it. S TEVE SIMONSEN/MARINE SCENES
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Sea otter with starfish, location TK Contents Restoring America’s Ocean Trust 1 Members of the Pew Oceans Commission 3 Our Oceans in Crisis 5 Our Nation and the Sea Today 15 A Plan of Action for Our Oceans 21 Ocean Governance for the 21st Century 21 Restoring America’s Fisheries 23 Confronting Coastal Sprawl 25 Cleaning Coastal Waters 26 Sustainable Marine Aquaculture 28 Charting a New Course 29 Works Cited 32 Acknowledgements 34 Publications of the Pew Oceans Commission on CD-ROM Inside Back Cover COMMISSION Leon E. Panetta, Chair Summary Report Recommendations for a New Ocean Policy May 2003 A merica s Living Oceans CHARTING A COURSE FOR SEA CHANGE Pacific double-saddle butterfly fish, Western Shoals, Agana Harbor, Guam Steve Simonsen/Marine Scenes
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Cushion sea star, Hurricane Hole, U.S. Virgin Islands Steve Simonsen/Marine Scenes 1 Americans have always loved the ocean. Half of us live in coastal communities and the other half come to visit. Perhaps, as President John F. Kennedy once suggested, it is “the salt in our veins.” When we stand at the water’s edge, we stare longingly out to sea—for the boat to return, for the tides to shift, for the winds to arrive, for the fish to bite, for the sun to rise or set—beyond the far horizon. Inspired by their majesty and mystery, we depend on our oceans and their coasts, not just for pleasure and food—although these uses are central— but also as a counterweight to extremes of heat and cold on land, as a sponge for absorbing excess car- bon, and as a generator of life-giving oxygen. Although we often view the ocean as starting where the land ends, that separation is arbitrary. Land and oceans are part of the same global system. Activities on one profoundly affect the other. Just as the 20th century brought us into knowl- edgeable contact with outer space, the 21st will almost certainly connect us more intimately to our oceans. In fact, it is imperative because—as much as we love our oceans—our ignorance has been destroying them. We love clean beaches, but what we discharge into the oceans befouls them. We destroy the very coastal wetlands we need to buffer storms and filter fresh water. A nation of seafood
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This note was uploaded on 09/28/2008 for the course EAS 1540 taught by Professor Monger during the Fall '07 term at Cornell.

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Pew_Report_Summary - Americas Living Oceans CHARTING A...

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