Document62 - [Last Name 1 Matthew Williams Dr Hayg Oshagan COM 1500 COM 1500 Survey of Mass Communication Final Paper Mass Media Effects on Violence

Document62 - [Last Name 1 Matthew Williams Dr Hayg Oshagan...

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[Last Name] 1 Matthew Williams Dr. Hayg Oshagan COM 1500 COM 1500 Survey of Mass Communication Final Paper: Mass Media Effects on Violence. Watching violence can be a popular form of entertainment. A crowd of people watching a fight on the street can be similar to Romans enjoying gladiators in battle. MMA, also known as Mixed Martial Arts, which features two men fighting in a cage for up to five rounds is one of the most popular sports in the country among younger television viewers. In the rural part of many countries, people enjoy combat between animals, such as cock fights in Indonesia, bull fights in Spain, and dog fights in rural parts of the United States. Violence can be depicted in folklore, fairy tales, and literature. Local news shows provide extensive coverage of violent crimes for ratings. Technological advances throughout the 20 th century and into the 21 st century have dramatically increased the availability of violent entertainment. This can be pointed to the introduction of television, which made violent entertainment available to children. There has been research that connects a dramatic increase in crime to the first generation that grew up with television. Is this the case? Is there a loose definition with the term violence? What were other things that stood out throughout the research? Hopefully those questions will be answered over the next few pages. In the December 2003 edition of Psychological Science in the Public Interest, written by Craig Anderson, Leonard Berkowitz, Edward Donnerstein, Rowell L. Huesmann, James D. Johnson, Daniel Linz, Neil M. Malamuth, and Ellen Wartella, research reveals unequivocal evidence that media violence increases the likelihood of aggressive and violent behavior and long-term contexts. The effects appear larger for milder than for more severe forms of aggression, but the
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[Last Name] 2 effects on more severe forms of violence are also substantial(r =.13 to .32) when compared with effects of other violence risk factors or medical effects deemed important by the medical community. The research base is large; diverse in methods, samples, and media genres, and consistent in overall findings. The evidence is clearest within the most extensively researched domain, television and film violence. Short-term exposure increases the likelihood of physically and verbally aggressive behavior, aggressive thoughts, and aggressive emotions. Recent large-scale studies provide converging evidence linking frequent exposure to violent media in childhood with aggression later in life, including physical assaults and spouse abuse. Media violence produces short-term increases by priming existing aggressive scripts and cognitions, increasing physiological arousal, and triggering an automatic tendency to imitate observed behaviors.
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  • Fall '13
  • Osheagan
  • Mass Media, It, media violence, Rowell L. Huesmann

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