Final Submission - Final Project 2.odt - IHP 501 Global Health and Diversity Final Project Two Submission Policy Analysis and Testimony Transcript

Final Submission - Final Project 2.odt - IHP 501 Global...

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IHP 501 Global Health and Diversity Final Project Two Submission: Policy Analysis and Testimony Transcript Southern New Hampshire University Jessica Dannelley
Healthcare has grown in complexity since it first began and will continue to grow and morph as the world of healthcare continues to advance. The evolution of health care delivery in the United States “began with crude fold remedies used by settlers who had to cope with epidemics, life threatening weather, nutritional disorders, and starvation. Healthcare delivery in the twentieth century is characterized by an emphasis on rising costs, the need for insurance, and a role of government in the payment for services” (Green & Bowie # 1, 2005). Technology has helped to shape healthcare as we know it today. Not only has there been an increase in the accessibility of treatment, but “health IT opens up many more avenues of exploration and research, which allows experts to make healthcare more driven and effective than it ever has been” (UIC, 2016). Physicians and patients are now experiencing the many benefits that come with being able to have on demand access to medical information, anytime, anywhere, whenever and however it is needed. With each new update to the various software systems that are used within hospitals and clinics, more challenges are overcome making way for new improvements for how they operate from day to day. One of the most influential healthcare laws in existence today that impacts information technology is “The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) Privacy Rule [which] is the first comprehensive Federal protection for the privacy of personal health information” (HIPPA Privacy Rule, 2007). HIPAA In 1996, The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) was passed and is currently overseen by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. “It mandates administrative simplification regulations that govern privacy, security, and electronic transactions standards for health care information” (Green & Bowie # 2, 2016). The Department of Health and Human Services (HHA)
published what are commonly known as the HIPAA Privacy Rule and the HIPAA Security Rule. The Privacy Rule, or Standards for Privacy of Individually Identifiable Health Information , “establishes national standards for the protection of certain health information” (HHS, 2017). The Security Standards for the Protection of Electronic Protected Health Information (the Security Rule) “establish a national set of security standards for protecting certain health information that is held or transferred in electronic form” (HHS, 2017). The Security Rule contains the standards for the protection and safeguard of electronic personal health information (ePHI) for when it is at rest and in transit. These standards apply to everyone and every system that has any sort of access to confidential patient data. “By 'access' we mean having the means necessary to read, write, modify or

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