RUR - Robots Rule! In the early 1900s Czechoslovakian...

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Unformatted text preview: Robots Rule! In the early 1900s Czechoslovakian writer Karel Capek was struck by an idea for a new play. He rushed to his brother excited about his idea yet still cloudy on a few details. Capeks new play was to involve artificial workers but he did not have a name for them. His brother, Josef Capek, a distinguished painter and writer, pondered his brothers dilemma for a moment and said, Call them Robots coming from the Czech word robota which means labor. Thus, in 1920, the word Robot is first introduced to the mainstream in the play R.U.R. an acronym for Rossums Universal Robots. Capek focuses on the speedy, dangerous advancement of technology in society and the overall dehumanization that follows. Also, R.U.R. says something of mankinds own repetitive moves and actions and how we ourselves can be somewhat of a Robot. We wake up at certain times, make sure we are at appointments and obey laws without question. The scientists even act like Robots when they first meet Helena, instantly falling in love, planning to stand in line in an attempt to woo her into marriage. Out of this love, Dr. Gall robotically caves in to Helenas pleas to make the Robots more human. When asked about the reason for 1 female Robots, Domin, Rossums Universal Robots manager responds, Theres a certain demand for [female...
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RUR - Robots Rule! In the early 1900s Czechoslovakian...

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